James Shields (politician, born 1806)

James Shields, photograph by Mathew Brady, c. 1863

Irish American Democratic politician and United States Army officer, who is the only person in U.S. history to serve as a Senator for three different states, and one of only two to represent multiple states in the U.S. Senate.

- James Shields (politician, born 1806)

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32nd United States Congress

Meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives.

Uncle Tom's Cabin was published in 1852

3. James Shields (D)

33rd United States Congress

Meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives.

Gadsden Purchase (in yellow)
President of the Senate
William R. King
Senate President pro tempore
David R. Atchison
Senate President pro tempore
Jesse D. Bright

3. James Shields (D)

35th United States Congress

Meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives.

Group photo of the U.S. Senate, in 1859, during this Congress.
President of the Senate John C. Breckinridge
Senate President pro tempore James Murray Mason, March 4, 1857
Senate President pro tempore Thomas J. Rusk, March 14, 1857 – July 29, 1857
Senate President pro tempore Benjamin Fitzpatrick, from December 7, 1857

2. James Shields (D), from May 11, 1858 (newly admitted state)

45th United States Congress

Meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives.

President of the Senate William A. Wheeler
President pro tempore Thomas W. Ferry
Speaker Samuel J. Randall

James Shields (D), from January 27, 1879

Duel

Arranged engagement in combat between two people, with matched weapons, in accordance with agreed-upon rules.

The Code Of Honor—A Duel in the Bois De Boulogne, Near Paris, wood-engraving after Godefroy Durand, Harper's Weekly (January 1875)
Depiction of a judicial combat in the Dresden codex of the Sachsenspiegel (early to mid-14th century), illustrating the provision that the two combatants must "share the sun", i.e. align themselves perpendicular to the sun so that neither has an advantage.
Commemorative poster for the fourth centennial of the Disfida di Barletta, the Challenge of Barletta, fought on 13 February 1503 between 13 Italian and 13 French knights all shown wearing full plate armour.
Minamoto no Yoshihira and Taira no Shigemori (Japan in 1159)
Dueling remained highly popular in European society, despite various attempts at banning the practice.
German students of a Burschenschaft fighting a sabre duel, around 1900, painting by Georg Mühlberg (1863–1925)
An anti-dueling sermon written by an acquaintance of Alexander Hamilton.
A 1902 illustration showing Alexander Hamilton fighting his fatal duel with Vice President Aaron Burr, July 1804
Pistol dueling as an associate event at the 1908 London Olympic Games
The fictional pistol duel between Eugene Onegin and Vladimir Lensky. Watercolour by Ilya Repin (1899)
Depiction of the pistol duel of Alexander Pushkin vs. Georges d'Anthès, January 1837
Wild Bill Hickok's duel with Davis Tutt became the quintessential quick draw duel in US history.
An Act for the punishing and preventing of Duelling (1728), Massachusetts Bay Colony
Gada (mace) duel between Bhima and Duryodhana
Depiction of the duel of Miyamoto Musashi vs. Sasaki Kojirō

On September 22, 1842, future President Abraham Lincoln, at the time an Illinois state legislator, met to duel with state auditor James Shields, but their seconds intervened and persuaded them against it.

31st United States Congress

Meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives.

President of the Senate Millard Fillmore

3. James Shields (D), until March 6, 1849

Battle of Chapultepec

Battle between American forces and Mexican forces holding the strategically located Chapultepec Castle just outside Mexico City, fought 13 September 1847 during the Mexican–American War.

Battle of Chapultepec, Carl Nebel, 1851
Disposition of forces
Plate and place where the remains of six Mexican soldiers were said to be found in Chapultepec in 1947
Battle of Chapultepec by James Walker, 1857
Attack on the Castle Chapultepec
Storming of Chapultepec in Mexico
Attack on Chapultepec, Sept. 13, 1847
Monument to the six Heroic Cadets, with Chapultepec Castle in the background.
Molino del Rey is on the left. "O" depicts a Mexican battery, "P" an American battery, and "R" is Steptoe's battery.

Quitman sent Persifor Smith's brigade to his right and brought in James Shields, plus the New York and 2d Pennsylvania Regiments into the assault.

Jackson's Valley campaign

Confederate Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's spring 1862 campaign through the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia during the American Civil War.

Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson, commander of the Confederate forces in the Shenandoah Valley campaign of 1862
Shenandoah River watershed
Kernstown (March 23) to McDowell (May 8)
A map of the battle by Jedediah Hotchkiss
Front Royal Va.—The Union Army under Banks entering the town, drawing by Edwin Forbes
"Action at Front Royal, Va."
Actions from Front Royal to First Winchester, May 24–25, 1862
Front Royal (May 23) to Port Republic (June 9)
Sketch of the battle-field of Cross Keys, Va., June 8, 1862, Julius Bien & Co.
The battle of Cross Keys—Sunday June 7, 1862 [sic]—Genl. Fremont and Genl. Jackson, drawing by Edwin Forbes
Brig. Gen. Isaac R. Trimble
Battle of Port Republic
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Bringing in Union reinforcements from eastern Virginia, Brig. Gen. James Shields recaptured Front Royal and planned to link up with Frémont in Strasburg.

Battle of Churubusco

In retreat from the Battle of Contreras or Battle of Padierna during the Mexican–American War.

Battle of Churubusco, J. Cameron, published by Nathaniel Currier
Environs south of Mexico City
Churubusco
Battle of Churubusco, during the Mexican–American War, painting by Carl Nebel
Battle of Churubusco
Map of the battle of Churubusco
Churubusco's monastery at the height of the 1847 Battle of Churubusco, painted by James Walker

The attack by Franklin Pierce and James Shields, crossing the river on the Coyoacan-Mixcoac road in an attempt to cut off the Mexican retreat, was also stopped.

Army of the Potomac

The principal Union Army in the Eastern Theater of the American Civil War.

Commanders of the Army of the Potomac at Culpeper, Virginia, 1863. From the left: Gouverneur K. Warren, William H. French, George G. Meade, Henry J. Hunt, Andrew A. Humphreys, George Sykes
The Army of the Potomac – Our Outlying Picket in the Woods, 1862
Grand Review of the Army of the Potomac, drawn by Thomas Nast, Harper's Weekly, October 10, 1863
Saint Patrick's Day celebration in the Army of the Potomac, depicting a steeplechase race among the Irish Brigade, March 17, 1863, by Edwin Forbes
Scouts and guides, Army of the Potomac, Mathew Brady
Headquarters of the 5th Corps, Army of the Potomac, at the home of Col. Avery near Petersburg, Virginia, June 1864. Photograph by Mathew Brady. From the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
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Commanded by Edwin V. Sumner, William B. Franklin, Louis Blenker, Nathaniel P. Banks, Frederick W. Lander (Replaced by James Shields after Lander's death on March 2, 1862, Silas Casey, Irvin McDowell, Fitz John Porter, Samuel P. Heintzelman, Don Carlos Buell (Replaced by Erasmus D. Keyes in November, 1861), William F. Smith, Joseph Hooker, John A. Dix, Charles P. Stone (Replaced by John Sedgwick in February, 1862), George A. McCall, George Stoneman (Replaced by Philip St. George Cooke in January, 1862) and Henry J. Hunt.