Jameson Raid

Dr. Jameson's RaidAftermathfailed raidoverthrow of the government of the Transvaal
The Jameson Raid (29 December 1895 – 2 January 1896) was a botched raid against the South African Republic (commonly known as the Transvaal) carried out by British colonial statesman Leander Starr Jameson and his Company troops ("police" in the employ of Alfred Beit's and Cecil Rhodes' British South Africa Company) and Bechuanaland policemen over the New Year weekend of 1895–96.wikipedia
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Leander Starr Jameson

JamesonSir Leander Starr JamesonDr. Jameson
The Jameson Raid (29 December 1895 – 2 January 1896) was a botched raid against the South African Republic (commonly known as the Transvaal) carried out by British colonial statesman Leander Starr Jameson and his Company troops ("police" in the employ of Alfred Beit's and Cecil Rhodes' British South Africa Company) and Bechuanaland policemen over the New Year weekend of 1895–96. The force was placed under the control of Leander Starr Jameson, the Administrator General of the Chartered Company (of which Cecil Rhodes was the Chairman) for Matabeleland. He rushed back to London and ordered Sir Hercules Robinson, Governor-General of the Cape Colony, to repudiate the actions of Jameson and warned Rhodes that the Company's Charter would be in danger if it were discovered the Cape Prime Minister was involved in the Raid.
Sir Leander Starr Jameson, 1st Baronet, (9 February 1853 – 26 November 1917) was a British colonial politician who was best known for his involvement in the Jameson Raid.

Cecil Rhodes

RhodesCecil John RhodesCecil
The Jameson Raid (29 December 1895 – 2 January 1896) was a botched raid against the South African Republic (commonly known as the Transvaal) carried out by British colonial statesman Leander Starr Jameson and his Company troops ("police" in the employ of Alfred Beit's and Cecil Rhodes' British South Africa Company) and Bechuanaland policemen over the New Year weekend of 1895–96.
After overseeing the formation of Rhodesia during the early 1890s, he was forced to resign as Prime Minister in 1896 after the disastrous Jameson Raid, an unauthorised attack on Paul Kruger's South African Republic (or Transvaal).

Paul Kruger

KrugerPresident KrugerPresident Paul Kruger
Paul Kruger was president of the republic at the time.
The uitlander problem and the associated tensions with Britain dominated Kruger's attention for the rest of his presidency, to which he was re-elected in 1888, 1893 and 1898, and led to the Jameson Raid of 1895–96 and ultimately the Second Boer War.

Second Boer War

Boer WarAnglo-Boer WarSouth African War
The raid was ineffective and no uprising took place, but it was an inciting factor in the Second Boer War and the Second Matabele War.
Britain's expansionist ideas (notably propagated by Cecil Rhodes) as well as disputes over uitlander political and economic rights resulted in the failed Jameson Raid of 1895.

British South Africa Company

British South Africa Company (BSAC)Chartered CompanyChartereds
The Jameson Raid (29 December 1895 – 2 January 1896) was a botched raid against the South African Republic (commonly known as the Transvaal) carried out by British colonial statesman Leander Starr Jameson and his Company troops ("police" in the employ of Alfred Beit's and Cecil Rhodes' British South Africa Company) and Bechuanaland policemen over the New Year weekend of 1895–96.
Earl Grey was the only London-based director to know about plans for the Jameson Raid, and he, like Rhodes and Beit, did not share this knowledge with the other BSAC directors.

Second Matabele War

Matabele campaignFirst Chimurengafirst outbreak of rebellion against European rule
The raid was ineffective and no uprising took place, but it was an inciting factor in the Second Boer War and the Second Matabele War. Seizing on this weakness, and a discontent with the British South Africa Company, the Ndebele revolted during March 1896 in what is now celebrated in Zimbabwe as the First War of Independence, the First Chimurenga, but it is better known to most of the world as the Second Matabele War.
Only a few months earlier, the British South Africa Company's Administrator General for Matabeleland, Leander Starr Jameson, had sent most of his troops and armaments to fight the Transvaal Republic in the ill-fated Jameson Raid.

Alfred Beit

Beit TrustBeitSir Alfred Beit
The Jameson Raid (29 December 1895 – 2 January 1896) was a botched raid against the South African Republic (commonly known as the Transvaal) carried out by British colonial statesman Leander Starr Jameson and his Company troops ("police" in the employ of Alfred Beit's and Cecil Rhodes' British South Africa Company) and Bechuanaland policemen over the New Year weekend of 1895–96.
Inspired by Rhodes' imperialist vision, he took part in the planning and financing of the unsuccessful Jameson Raid of late 1895 which was intended to trigger a coup in the South African Republic in the Transvaal.

Cape Colony

Cape of Good HopeCapeGovernor of the Cape of Good Hope
Rather, the territory had four distinct entities: the two British colonies of Cape Colony and Natal; and the two Boer republics of the Orange Free State and the South African Republic, more commonly referred to as the Transvaal.
In particular, he sought to engineer the conquest of the Transvaal, and although his ill-fated Jameson Raid failed and brought down his government, it led to the Second Boer War and British conquest at the turn of the century.

Uitlander

uitlanders
The raid was intended to trigger an uprising by the primarily British expatriate workers (known as Uitlanders) in the Transvaal but failed to do so. The workers were called the Johannesburg conspirators.
Their treatment served as the pretext for the Jameson Raid in 1895; Cecil Rhodes planned an invasion of the Transvaal to coincide with an uprising of the uitlanders in Johannesburg.

Orange Free State

Free StateOrange Free State RepublicRepublic of the Orange Free State
Rather, the territory had four distinct entities: the two British colonies of Cape Colony and Natal; and the two Boer republics of the Orange Free State and the South African Republic, more commonly referred to as the Transvaal.
The Free State retained the right to purchase this extension at cost, a right it exercised after the Jameson Raid.

Johannesburg

Johannesburg, South AfricaJohannesburg, GautengJohannesburg WCT
On 29 December 1895 Jameson's armed column crossed into the Transvaal and headed for Johannesburg.
As the value of control of the land increased, tensions developed between the Boer-dominated Transvaal government in Pretoria and the British, culminating in the Jameson Raid that ended in fiasco at Doornkop in January 1896.

John Hays Hammond

John Hays Hammond, Sr.
For conspiring with Jameson, the members of the Reform Committee (Transvaal), including Colonel Frank Rhodes and John Hays Hammond, were jailed in deplorable conditions, found guilty of high treason, and sentenced to death by hanging.
But after the dismal failure of the Jameson Raid, Hammond, along with the other leaders of the Johannesburg Reform Committee, was arrested and subsequently sentenced to death.

South African Republic

TransvaalTransvaal RepublicZuid-Afrikaansche Republiek
The Jameson Raid (29 December 1895 – 2 January 1896) was a botched raid against the South African Republic (commonly known as the Transvaal) carried out by British colonial statesman Leander Starr Jameson and his Company troops ("police" in the employ of Alfred Beit's and Cecil Rhodes' British South Africa Company) and Bechuanaland policemen over the New Year weekend of 1895–96. Rather, the territory had four distinct entities: the two British colonies of Cape Colony and Natal; and the two Boer republics of the Orange Free State and the South African Republic, more commonly referred to as the Transvaal. The raid was intended to trigger an uprising by the primarily British expatriate workers (known as Uitlanders) in the Transvaal but failed to do so. The workers were called the Johannesburg conspirators. On 29 December 1895 Jameson's armed column crossed into the Transvaal and headed for Johannesburg.
The UK first attacked the South African Republic in December 1895, the Jameson Raid.

Raleigh Grey

Sir Raleigh GreyCaptain Raleigh Grey
Among the other commanders was Raleigh Grey.
From 1894 to 1897 his kinsman the 4th Earl Grey was Administrator of Rhodesia, and Grey accompanied Leander Starr Jameson on the Jameson Raid in 1895; in the aftermath of the raid, Grey served five months' imprisonment.

Piet Cronjé

CronjeGeneral CronjeGeneral Cronjé
The tired Jameson raiders initially exchanged fire with the Boers losing around thirty men before Jameson realized the position was hopeless and surrendered to Commandant Piet Cronjé.
Cronjé was in command of the force that rounded up Leander Jameson at Doornkop at the conclusion of the Jameson Raid on 2 January 1896.

Kruger telegram

telegram of supportcongratulatory telegramtelegram
A few days after the raid, the Kaiser of Germany sent a telegram (the "Kruger telegram") congratulating President Kruger and the Transvaal government on their success "without the help of friendly powers", alluding to potential support by Germany.
The Kaiser congratulated the president on repelling the Jameson Raid, a sortie by 600 British irregulars from Cape Colony into the Transvaal under the command of Leander Starr Jameson.

Doornkop

JOHANNESBURG
The Boers however tracked the move overnight and on 2 January as the light improved a substantial Boer force with some artillery was waiting for Jameson at Doornkop.
It is the spot where Dr Leander Starr Jameson was defeated on January 2, 1896 following the Jameson Raid.

Joseph Chamberlain

ChamberlainJoseph The Right Honourable '''Joseph Chamberlain
The British Colonial Secretary, Joseph Chamberlain, though sympathetic to the ultimate goals of the Raid, realized it would be a mistake since the uitlanders were not supportive.
The subsequent Jameson Raid resulted in the surrender of the invaders.

Zimbabwe

🇿🇼 RhodesiaZimbabwean
Seizing on this weakness, and a discontent with the British South Africa Company, the Ndebele revolted during March 1896 in what is now celebrated in Zimbabwe as the First War of Independence, the First Chimurenga, but it is better known to most of the world as the Second Matabele War.
Shortly after Rhodes' disastrous Jameson Raid on the South African Republic, the Ndebele rebelled against white rule, led by their charismatic religious leader, Mlimo.

Matabeleland

Matabele kingdomMatabeleland ProvinceMatebeleland
The force was placed under the control of Leander Starr Jameson, the Administrator General of the Chartered Company (of which Cecil Rhodes was the Chairman) for Matabeleland.
Only a few months earlier, the British South Africa Company's Administrator General for Matabeleland, Leander Starr Jameson, had sent most of his troops and armaments to fight the Transvaal Republic in the ill-fated Jameson Raid.

Hercules Robinson, 1st Baron Rosmead

Sir Hercules RobinsonHercules RobinsonHercules Robinson, Lord Rosmead
He rushed back to London and ordered Sir Hercules Robinson, Governor-General of the Cape Colony, to repudiate the actions of Jameson and warned Rhodes that the Company's Charter would be in danger if it were discovered the Cape Prime Minister was involved in the Raid.
The Jameson Raid produced a permanent estrangement between him and Cecil Rhodes, and he was out of sympathy with the new colonial secretary, Joseph Chamberlain, who had criticised his appointment, and now desired Robinson to take this opportunity of settling the whole question of the position of the Uitlanders in the Transvaal.

Frank Rhodes (British Army officer)

Frank RhodesCol. Frank RhodesColonel Francis Rhodes
For conspiring with Jameson, the members of the Reform Committee (Transvaal), including Colonel Frank Rhodes and John Hays Hammond, were jailed in deplorable conditions, found guilty of high treason, and sentenced to death by hanging.
The Jameson Raid was perhaps the most trying event in Rhodes's career.

Drifts Crisis

Drifts Crisis
The Crisis has traditionally been seen as the precursor to the Jameson Raid and the uncompromising policies of High Commissioner for Southern Africa Alfred Milner which followed, and eventually led to the Second Anglo-Boer War (9 October 1899 – 31 May 1902).

Frederick Russell Burnham

Frederick R. BurnhamBurnhamFrederick Burnham
Against over 50,000 Ndebele held up in their stronghold of the Matobo Hills the settlers mounted patrols under such people as Burnham, Baden-Powell, and Selous.
The colonists' defenses in Matabeleland were undermanned due to the ill-fated Jameson Raid into the South African Republic (or Transvaal), and in the first few months of the war alone hundreds of white settlers were killed.

Chimurenga

First ChimurengaFirst ''Chimurengaliberation movement
Seizing on this weakness, and a discontent with the British South Africa Company, the Ndebele revolted during March 1896 in what is now celebrated in Zimbabwe as the First War of Independence, the First Chimurenga, but it is better known to most of the world as the Second Matabele War.
Only a few months earlier, the British South Africa Company's Administrator General for Matabeleland, Leander Starr Jameson, had sent most of his troops and armaments to fight the Transvaal Republic in the ill-fated Jameson Raid.