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Czechs

CzechBohemianCzech people
undefined 1360 – 11 October 1424) was a Czech general, a contemporary and follower of Jan Hus, Hussite military leader, and later also a Radical Hussite who led the Taborites.
Jan Žižka and Prokop the Great were leaders of hussite army, George of Poděbrady was a hussite king.

Battle of Vítkov Hill

battle in 1420 near Praguedefence of Vítkov Hillvictory on this hill in 1420
A monument was erected on the Vítkov Hill in Prague to honor Jan Žižka and his victory on this hill in 1420.
The battle pitted the forces of Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor, against Hussite forces under command of Jan Žižka (in English, John Zizka).

National Monument at Vítkov

National MonumentA monumentstatue of Jan Žižka
A monument was erected on the Vítkov Hill in Prague to honor Jan Žižka and his victory on this hill in 1420.
It includes the third largest bronze equestrian statue in the world, of Jan Žižka, who defeated catholic forces led by King Sigismund in 1420 in the Battle of Vítkov Hill.

Prague

PrahaPrague, Czech RepublicPrag
A monument was erected on the Vítkov Hill in Prague to honor Jan Žižka and his victory on this hill in 1420.
Peasant rebels, led by the general Jan Žižka, along with Hussite troops from Prague, defeated Emperor Sigismund, in the Battle of Vítkov Hill in 1420.

Kingdom of Bohemia

BohemiaBohemianBohemian Crown
He was born in the small village of Trocnov (now part of Borovany) in the Kingdom of Bohemia into an aristocratic family.
Led by a Czech yeoman, Jan Žižka, the Taborites streamed into the capital.

Battle of Sudoměř

Sudoměřvictory at Sudoměř
On March 25, 1420 he defeated the partisans of Sigismund at Sudoměř, the first pitched battle of the Hussite wars.
The Hussites were led by Břeněk of Švihov - who was killed in battle - and Jan Žižka, whose forces proved victorious.

Battle of Kutná Hora

at Kutná Hora
In the Battle of Kutná Hora (1421) he defeated the army of the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary.
Under the leadership of the talented general Jan Žižka, the Taborites adopted the latest weaponry available, including handguns, long, thin cannons, nicknamed "snakes", and war wagons.

Battle of Grunwald

GrunwaldBattle of Grunwald (Tannenberg)Battle of Tannenberg
He fought in the Battle of Grunwald (July 15, 1410), where he defended Radzyń against the Teutonic Order.
Serving among the Czechs was possibly Jan Žižka, future commander of the Hussite forces.

Hussites

HussiteHussitismHussite movement
undefined 1360 – 11 October 1424) was a Czech general, a contemporary and follower of Jan Hus, Hussite military leader, and later also a Radical Hussite who led the Taborites.
A number of Czech national heroes were Hussite, including Jan Zizka, who led a fierce resistance to five consecutive crusades proclaimed on Hussite Bohemia by the Papacy.

Hussite Wars

HussiteHussitesHussite army
Žižka was the military leader of the Hussites in the Hussite Wars.
Shortly before his death Hus had accepted the doctrine of Utraquism preached during his absence by his adherents at Prague: the obligation of the faithful to receive communion in both kinds, bread and wine (sub utraque specie). This doctrine became the watchword of the moderate Hussites known as the Utraquists or Calixtines, from the Latin calix (the chalice), in Czech kališníci (from kalich). The more extreme Hussites became known as Taborites (táborité), after the city of Tábor that became their center; or Orphans (sirotci), a name they adopted after the death of their leader and general Jan Žižka.

Jan Hus

HusJohn HussHussites
undefined 1360 – 11 October 1424) was a Czech general, a contemporary and follower of Jan Hus, Hussite military leader, and later also a Radical Hussite who led the Taborites.
Under the leadership of Jan Žižka (c. 1360 – 1424) and later of Prokop the Great (c. 1380 – 1434) – both excellent commanders – the Hussites defeated the crusade and the other three crusades that followed (1419–1434).

Taborites

Taboritedivided HussitesTaborite communities
undefined 1360 – 11 October 1424) was a Czech general, a contemporary and follower of Jan Hus, Hussite military leader, and later also a Radical Hussite who led the Taborites.
Followers of Kániš included Adamites, and Kániš himself was burnt as a heretic in 1421 by order of Jan Žižka

Žižkov

Prague's Žižkov districtPrague-Žižkov
At Prague, Žižka and his men took up a strong position on the hill just outside the city known as the Vítkov, now in Žižkov, a district of Prague named after the battle in his honour.
The district is named after Hussite military leader Jan Žižka.

Čáslav

TschaslauČaslauČáslav, Central Bohemia
However, the estates of Bohemia and Moravia met at Čáslav on June 1, 1421 and decided to appoint a provisional government, consisting of twenty members chosen from all the political and religious parties of the country.
In 1910, part of the cranium of famous Hussite general Jan Žižka z Trocnova was discovered in Čáslav parish church.

Bohemia

BohemianCzechČechy
King Sigismund was king of Hungary but only the titular king of Bohemia.
The uprising against imperial forces was led by a former mercenary, Jan Žižka of Trocnov.

Battle of Vyšehrad

battle of VysehradVyšehrad
The citizens of Prague laid siege to the Vyšehrad (see Battle of Vyšehrad), and towards the end of October the garrison was on the point of capitulating through famine.
In December 1419, one of these formations under the command of Jan Žižka was surprised by Catholic forces under the command of Bohuslav of Švamberk.

Tábor

TaborCzechTábor, Czech Republic
On August 22 the Taborites left Prague and returned to Tábor.
In the centre of the square is the statue of Jan Žižka, the greatest of the Hussite leaders.

Kutná Hora

KuttenbergKutné HořeKutné Hory
At the end of 1421, Sigismund, again attempted to subdue Bohemia and gained possession of the important town of Kutná Hora.
Kuttenberg (Kutná Hora) was taken by Jan Žižka, and after a temporary reconciliation of the warring parties was burned by the imperial troops in 1422, to prevent its falling again into the hands of the Taborites.

Medieval (film)

MedievalJan ŽižkaMedieval'' (film)
A film Jan Žižka is currently in works by director Petr Jákl.
It is about life of Jan Žižka, Bohemian military commander who never lost a battle.

Prokop the Great

Prokop Prokop VelikýAndreas Prokop
He was succeeded by Prokop the Great.
He was not the immediate successor of Jan Žižka as leader of the Taborites, as has been frequently stated, but he commanded the forces of Tabor when they obtained their great victories over the Germans and Catholics at Ústí nad Labem in 1426 and Domažlice in 1431.

Jan Rokycana

John of Rokycan
On the 14th of that month, peace was concluded between the Hussite parties through the influence of John of Rokycany, afterwards Utraquist archbishop of Prague.
Later in Prague he opposed Jan Žižka, when he was blamed for the defeat of the Prague militia at Malešov.

Rabí Castle

Rabí
Later that year he was severely wounded while besieging the castle of Rábí, and lost the use of his remaining eye.
In 1420–21, the Hussites conquered the castle twice, and legend has it that during the second siege an arrow fired from crossbow hit the trunk of a pear tree and a resulting splinter from the tree hit Jan Žižka in his only good eye.

Battle of Deutschbrod

Německý Brod
Sigismund's forces made a last stand at Německý Brod (Deutschbrod) on 10 January, but the city was stormed by the Czechs, and contrary to Žižka's orders, its defenders were put to the sword.
Led by Jan Žižka, the Hussites besieged 2,000 Royalist crusaders.

Malešov

In 1424, civil war having again broken out in Bohemia, Žižka decisively defeated the "Praguers" and Utraquist nobles at Skalice on January 6, and at Malešov on June 7.
In 1424 Jan Žižka defeated the resisting Prague Hussites.

Adamites

Neo-AdamitesAdamism
Žižka summarily suppressed some disturbances on the part of a fanatical sect called the Adamites.
Jan Žižka, the Hussite leader, nearly exterminated the sect in 1421.