Jan Hus

HusJohn HussHussitesJohannes HusJohn HusHussiteSynod of ConstanceHusoviHussHussitism
Jan Hus (c. 1369 – 6 July, 1415), sometimes Anglicized as John Hus or John Huss, also referred to in historical texts as Iohannes Hus or Johannes Huss) was a Czech theologian, philosopher, master, dean, and rector of the Charles University in Prague who became a church reformer, an inspirer of Hussitism, a key predecessor to Protestantism and a seminal figure in the Bohemian Reformation.wikipedia
456 Related Articles

Protestantism

ProtestantProtestantsEvangelical
1369 – 6 July, 1415), sometimes Anglicized as John Hus or John Huss, also referred to in historical texts as Iohannes Hus or Johannes Huss) was a Czech theologian, philosopher, master, dean, and rector of the Charles University in Prague who became a church reformer, an inspirer of Hussitism, a key predecessor to Protestantism and a seminal figure in the Bohemian Reformation.
Although there were earlier breaks and attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church—notably by Peter Waldo, John Wycliffe, and Jan Hus—only Luther succeeded in sparking a wider, lasting, and modern movement.

Prague

PrahaPrague, Czech RepublicPrag
1369 – 6 July, 1415), sometimes Anglicized as John Hus or John Huss, also referred to in historical texts as Iohannes Hus or Johannes Huss) was a Czech theologian, philosopher, master, dean, and rector of the Charles University in Prague who became a church reformer, an inspirer of Hussitism, a key predecessor to Protestantism and a seminal figure in the Bohemian Reformation.
Jan Hus, a theologian and rector at the Charles University, preached in Prague.

Bohemian Reformation

ReformationBohemianBohemian Brethren
1369 – 6 July, 1415), sometimes Anglicized as John Hus or John Huss, also referred to in historical texts as Iohannes Hus or Johannes Huss) was a Czech theologian, philosopher, master, dean, and rector of the Charles University in Prague who became a church reformer, an inspirer of Hussitism, a key predecessor to Protestantism and a seminal figure in the Bohemian Reformation. For the Bohemian Reformation, this step was as significant as the 95 theses posted in Wittenberg by Martin Luther in 1517.
The Bohemian Reformation included particularly the efforts to reform the church before Hus, the Hussite movement (including e.g. Taborites and Orebites), the Unity of the Brethren and Utraquists or Calixtines.

Czechs

CzechBohemianCzech people
1369 – 6 July, 1415), sometimes Anglicized as John Hus or John Huss, also referred to in historical texts as Iohannes Hus or Johannes Huss) was a Czech theologian, philosopher, master, dean, and rector of the Charles University in Prague who became a church reformer, an inspirer of Hussitism, a key predecessor to Protestantism and a seminal figure in the Bohemian Reformation.
Jan Hus was a religious reformist from the 15th century and spiritual father of the Hussite Movement.

John Wycliffe

WycliffeWycliffiteJohn Wyclif
After John Wycliffe, the theorist of ecclesiastical reform, Hus is considered the first church reformer, as he lived before Luther, Calvin, and Zwingli.
Wycliffe's writings in Latin greatly influenced the philosophy and teaching of the Czech reformer Jan Hus (c. undefined 1369–1415), whose execution in 1415 sparked a revolt and led to the Hussite Wars

Hussite Wars

HussiteHussitesHussite army
After Hus was executed in 1415, the followers of his religious teachings (known as Hussites) rebelled against their Catholic rulers and defeated five consecutive papal crusades between 1420 and 1431 in what became known as the Hussite Wars.
Starting around 1402, priest and scholar Jan Hus denounced what he judged as the corruption of the Church and the Papacy, and he promoted some of the reformist ideas of English theologian John Wycliffe.

Death by burning

burned at the stakeburnt at the stakeburning at the stake
He was burned at the stake for heresy against the doctrines of the Catholic Church, including those on ecclesiology, the Eucharist, and other theological topics.
Jan Hus was burned at the stake after being accused at the Roman Catholic Council of Constance (1414–18) of heresy.

Husinec (Prachatice District)

Husinec
Jan Hus was born in Husinec, Bohemia, c. 1369.
It is said to be the birthplace of Czech philosopher, reformer Jan Hus.

Martin Luther

LutherLutheranLuther’s
After John Wycliffe, the theorist of ecclesiastical reform, Hus is considered the first church reformer, as he lived before Luther, Calvin, and Zwingli. His teachings had a strong influence on the states of Western Europe, most immediately in the approval of a reformed Bohemian religious denomination, and, more than a century later, on Martin Luther himself.
For this, Eck branded Luther a new Jan Hus, referring to the Czech reformer and heretic burned at the stake in 1415.

Charles University

University of PraguePragueCharles University in Prague
1369 – 6 July, 1415), sometimes Anglicized as John Hus or John Huss, also referred to in historical texts as Iohannes Hus or Johannes Huss) was a Czech theologian, philosopher, master, dean, and rector of the Charles University in Prague who became a church reformer, an inspirer of Hussitism, a key predecessor to Protestantism and a seminal figure in the Bohemian Reformation.
The dean of the philosophical faculty, Jan Hus, translated Trialogus into the Czech language.

Czech language

CzechcsCzech-language
Although church authorities banned many works of Wycliffe in 1403, Hus translated Trialogus into Czech and helped to distribute it.
Jan Hus contributed significantly to the standardization of Czech orthography, advocated for widespread literacy among Czech commoners (particularly in religion) and made early efforts to model written Czech after the spoken language.

Christian denomination

denominationdenominationsdenominational
His teachings had a strong influence on the states of Western Europe, most immediately in the approval of a reformed Bohemian religious denomination, and, more than a century later, on Martin Luther himself.
In Bohemia, a movement in the early 15th century by Jan Hus called the Hussites defied Roman Catholic dogma and still exists to this day (alternately known as the Moravian Church).

Kingdom of Bohemia

BohemiaBohemianBohemian Crown
Jan Hus was born in Husinec, Bohemia, c. 1369. His teachings had a strong influence on the states of Western Europe, most immediately in the approval of a reformed Bohemian religious denomination, and, more than a century later, on Martin Luther himself.
In 1403 Jan Hus became rector of the university.

Rector (academia)

rectorrector magnificusuniversity rector
He served as rector of the University of Prague in 1402–1403.
Among the most important rectors of Czech universities were reformer Jan Hus, physician Jan Jesenius and representative of Enlightenment Josef Vratislav Monse.

Leipzig University

LeipzigUniversity of LeipzigKarl Marx University
This exodus resulted in the founding of the University of Leipzig, among others.
The university was modelled on the University of Prague, from which the German-speaking faculty members withdrew to Leipzig after the Jan Hus crisis and the Decree of Kutná Hora.

Zbyněk Zajíc of Hazmburk

Zbyněk Zajíc z Házmburka
Archbishop Zbyněk Zajíc tolerated this, and even appointed Hus a preacher at the clergy's biennial synod.
While he was initially a supporter of Czech religious reformer Jan Hus, but later strongly opposed his views and reformatory effort.

Council of Constance

ConstanceConclave of 141711 November 1417
(Alexander was declared an "antipope" by the Council of Constance in 1418.)
The council also condemned Jan Hus as a heretic and facilitated his execution by the civil authority.

Jan Žižka

ŽižkaJan Žižka of TrocnovJan Žižka z Trocnova
Under the leadership of Jan Žižka (c. 1360 – 1424) and later of Prokop the Great (c. 1380 – 1434) – both excellent commanders – the Hussites defeated the crusade and the other three crusades that followed (1419–1434).
undefined 1360 – 11 October 1424) was a Czech general, a contemporary and follower of Jan Hus, Hussite military leader, and later also a Radical Hussite who led the Taborites.

Konstanz

ConstanceBishop of ConstanzBishopric of Constance
To put an end to the papal schism and to take up the long desired reform of the Church, he arranged for a general council to convene on 1 November 1414, at Konstanz (Constance).
In 1414 to 1418, the Council of Constance took place, during which, on 6 July 1415, John Hus (Czech religious thinker, philosopher and reformer), who was seen as a threat to Christianity by the Roman Catholic Church, was burned at the stake.

Wenceslaus IV of Bohemia

WenceslausWenceslaus IVKing Wenceslaus IV
Then, in 1408, Pope Gregory XII warned Archbishop Zajic that the Church in Rome had been informed of Wycliffe's heresies and of the sympathies of King Wenceslaus IV for non-conformists.
As Bohemian king he sought to protect the religious reformer Jan Hus and his followers against the demands of the Roman Catholic Church for their suppression as heretics.

Bethlehem Chapel

Betlémská kaple
Hus continued to preach in the Bethlehem Chapel.
The Bethlehem Chapel (Betlémská kaple) is a medieval religious building in the Old Town of Prague, Czech Republic, notable for its connection with the origins of the Bohemian Reformation, especially with the Czech reformer Jan Hus.

Ninety-five Theses

95 Thesesthesesthe Ninety-Five Theses
For the Bohemian Reformation, this step was as significant as the 95 theses posted in Wittenberg by Martin Luther in 1517.
Jan Hus and his followers had advocated a more severe system of penance, in which indulgences were not available.

Hussites

HussiteHussitismHussite movement
1369 – 6 July, 1415), sometimes Anglicized as John Hus or John Huss, also referred to in historical texts as Iohannes Hus or Johannes Huss) was a Czech theologian, philosopher, master, dean, and rector of the Charles University in Prague who became a church reformer, an inspirer of Hussitism, a key predecessor to Protestantism and a seminal figure in the Bohemian Reformation. After Hus was executed in 1415, the followers of his religious teachings (known as Hussites) rebelled against their Catholic rulers and defeated five consecutive papal crusades between 1420 and 1431 in what became known as the Hussite Wars.
The Hussites (Husité or Kališníci; "Chalice People") were a pre-Protestant Christian movement that followed the teachings of Czech reformer Jan Hus, who became the best known representative of the Bohemian Reformation.

Louis III, Elector Palatine

Louis IIILouisElector Palatine Louis III
At the last moment, the imperial marshal, von Pappenheim, in the presence of the Count Palatine, asked Hus to recant and thus save his own life.
As such Louis later also executed the sentences against Jan Hus and Jerome of Prague.

Proto-Protestantism

proto-Protestantpre-Protestantproto-Protestants
In contrast to the popular perception that Hus was a proto-Protestant, some Eastern Orthodox Christians have argued that his theology was far closer to Eastern Orthodox Christianity.
Major representatives were Peter Waldo (c. 1140 – c. 1205), John Wycliffe (1320s–1384), Jan Hus (c.