Jannah

ParadiseheavenCennetFirdousfirdawsIslamic paradiseQuranic Garden of Paradiseseven heavensafterlifeAl-Firdaws
In Islam, Jannah (جنّة ; plural: Jannat Cennet), lit.wikipedia
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Islam

IslamicMuslimMuslims
In Islam, Jannah (جنّة ; plural: Jannat Cennet), lit. "garden", is the final abode of the righteous and the Islamic believers, but also the Garden of Eden, where Adam and Hawwa dwelt is called Jannah.
Like other Abrahamic religions, Islam also teaches a final judgment with the righteous rewarded in paradise and unrighteous punished in hell.

Jahannam

Hellhell in the afterlifeHellfire
In contrast to Jannah, the words [[Jahannam|]] and are used to refer to the concept of hell.
In both Quranic verses and hadiths, "the Fire" (Jahannam) is "a gruesome place of punishment that is always contrasted with Jannah, "the Garden" (paradise). Whatever characteristic "the Garden offered, the Fire usually offered the opposite conditions." Several hadith describes a part of hell that is extremely cold rather than hot, known as Zamhareer.

Illiyin

The highest level is known as (sometimes called Eden) or Illiyin.
Illiyin or Illiyun is a Quranic term referring to either the "most high" and "supreme" places above Jannah, i.e. the Garden of Eden or paradise, in the seventh heaven closest to the Throne of God (al-ʿArsh), or, according to a different interpretation, a register for the blessed or record of the righteous (analogous to Sijjin), which is mentioned in Surah al-Muṭaffifīn of the Quran.

Ridwan (name)

Ridwan
The Paradise is described as surrounded by eight principal gates, each level generally being divided into a hundred degrees guarded by angels (in some traditions Ridwan).
In Islamic tradition, Ridwan is the name of an angel in charge of maintaining Jannah.

Paradise

paradisicalparadisalparadisiacal
[[Firdaus|]] (Arabic: فردوس) is the literal term meaning paradise, but the Quran generally uses the term Jannah symbolically referring to paradise.
The same usage also appears in Arabic and in the Quran as firdaws فردوس.

Houri

72 VirginsHuriḤūr
Their life is one of bliss including wearing sumptuous robes, bracelets and perfumes as they partake in exquisite banquets served in priceless vessels by immortal youths (Houri), as they recline on couches inlaid with gold or precious stones.
Houris are described as "splendid companions of equal age [or well-matched]", "lovely eyed", of "modest gaze" and virgins who will accompany the faithful in Jannah.

Adam in Islam

AdamAdemĀdam
In Islam, Jannah (جنّة ; plural: Jannat Cennet), lit. "garden", is the final abode of the righteous and the Islamic believers, but also the Garden of Eden, where Adam and Hawwa dwelt is called Jannah.
Iblis (Devil) refused out of pride and was banished from Jannah (Paradise).

Garden of Eden

EdenThe Garden of EdenEarthly Paradise
In Islam, Jannah (جنّة ; plural: Jannat Cennet), lit. "garden", is the final abode of the righteous and the Islamic believers, but also the Garden of Eden, where Adam and Hawwa dwelt is called Jannah.
There are several mentions of "the Garden" in the Qur'an (2:35, 7:19, 20:117), while the Garden of Eden, without the word ʿadn, is commonly the fourth layer of the Islamic heaven and not necessarily thought as the dwelling place of Adam.

Heaven

celestialParadiseheavenly kingdom
sama' (usually pl. samawat) is the word for heaven in the sense of firmament or celestial sphere, as "seven heavens" (2:29, 78:12).
Still an afterlife destination of the righteous is conceived in Islam as Jannah (جنة "Garden [of Eden]" translated as "paradise").

Afterlife

life after deathhereafterafter death
According to the Quran, the basic criterion for salvation in the afterlife is the belief in the oneness of God ([[Tawhid|]]), Angels of God, revealed books of God, all messengers of God, as well as repentance to God, and doing good deeds.
Heaven, the heavens, seven heavens, pure lands, Tian, Jannah, Valhalla, or the Summerland, is a common religious, cosmological, or transcendent place where beings such as gods, angels, jinn, saints, or venerated ancestors are said to originate, be enthroned, or live.

Salsabil

central springSalsabīlspring in the Islamic paradise
Salsabil is the name of a spring that is the source of the rivers of Rahma (mercy) and Al-Kawthar (abundance).
Salsabil is an Islamic Arabic term referring to a spring in paradise (Jannah).

Jinn

geniedjinnjinns
Islamic scholars debated whether or not, the jinn can enter Jannah.
This jinn are distinct from an angelic tribe called Al-jinn, named after Jannah (the Gardens), heavenly creatures created out of the fires of samum in contrast to the genus of jinn created out of mixture of fire, who waged war against the genus of jinn and regarded as able to sin, unlike their light created counterpart.

Angels in Islam

angelsangelBelief in the Angels
Entrants will be greeted by angels with salutations of peace or As-Salamu Alaykum.

Muhammad

Prophet MuhammadMohammedMohammad
Regarding salvation from hell, according to hadith literature, Muhammad said, “Surely a time will come over hell when its gates shall be blown by wind, there shall be none in it, and this shall be after they have remained therein for many years.”
Later, during the Mi'raj, Muhammad is said to have toured heaven and hell, and spoke with earlier prophets, such as Abraham, Moses, and Jesus.

Syr Darya

JaxartesSyr-DaryaSyr Darya River
The names of four rivers are Saihan (Syr Darya), Jaihan (Amu Darya), Furat (Euphrates) and Nil (Nile).
Following the Muslim conquest, the river appears in the sources uniformly as the Seyhun, one of the four rivers flowing from the Paradise (Jannah in Arabic).

Araf (Islam)

ArafA'rafaʿrāf
Therefore, righteous Non-Muslims will neither enter hell nor Jannah, but will stay in Araf.
The realm is described as a high curtain between hell and paradise.

God in Islam

GodAllahSubhanahu wa ta'ala
The true beauty of paradise is also understood as the joy of beholding God, the creator.
For example, when humans in paradise see God, they do not see God in the way humans are able to see on Earth.

Al-Anʻām

Al-An'amAl-An'aamAl-An‘ām
Its main topics are monotheism, resurrection, heaven and hell.

Fallen angel

fallen angelsFallenfall
Impossibility to enter jannah only applies to the demons (shayatin) and unbelieving angels.
According to Ibn Abbas, angels who guard the Jinan (here: heavens) are called Jinni, just as humans who were from Mecca are called Mecci, but they are not related to the jinn.

Al-Mu'minoon

Al-Mu’minoonAl-Muminun23
Muhammad said: "If you ask Allah for Paradise, then ask him for Firdaus, for it is the highest part of Paradise, in the middle of Paradise, and from it spring the rivers of Paradise, and above it is the (Mighty) Throne of the Most Merciful."

Fasting in Islam

Sawmfastingfast
Faithful observance of the sawm is believed to atone for personal faults and misdeeds and to help earn a place in Paradise.

Al-Masjid an-Nabawi

Prophet's MosqueAl-Masjid al-NabawiMasjid al-Nabawi
It is regarded as one of the riyāḍ al-Jannah (رِيَـاض الْـجَـنَّـة, gardens of Paradise).

Muslims

MuslimMoslemMoslems
In Islam, Jannah (جنّة ; plural: Jannat Cennet), lit. "garden", is the final abode of the righteous and the Islamic believers, but also the Garden of Eden, where Adam and Hawwa dwelt is called Jannah.

Eve

HawwaEvaBiblical figure
In Islam, Jannah (جنّة ; plural: Jannat Cennet), lit. "garden", is the final abode of the righteous and the Islamic believers, but also the Garden of Eden, where Adam and Hawwa dwelt is called Jannah.

Hell

eternal punishmentinfernoinfernal
In contrast to Jannah, the words [[Jahannam|]] and are used to refer to the concept of hell.