A report on Japan

Legendary Emperor Jimmu (神武天皇)
Samurai warriors battling Mongols during the Mongol invasions of Japan, depicted in the
Emperor Meiji (明治天皇); 1852–1912
Japan's imperial ambitions ended on September 2, 1945, with the country's surrender to the Allies.
The Japanese archipelago
Mount Fuji in Spring, view from Arakurayama Sengen Park
Autumn maple leaves at Kongōbu-ji on Mount Kōya, a UNESCO World Heritage Site
The National Diet Building
Japan is a member of both the G7 and the G20.
JMSDF class destroyer
The Tokyo Stock Exchange
A rice paddy in Aizu, Fukushima Prefecture
A plug-in hybrid car manufactured by Toyota. Japan is the third-largest maker of motor vehicles in the world.
The Japanese Experiment Module (Kibō) at the International Space Station
Japan Airlines, the flag carrier of Japan
The Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant
The Greater Tokyo Area is ranked as the most populous metropolitan area in the world.
The torii of Itsukushima Shinto Shrine near Hiroshima
Kanji and hiragana signs
Students celebrating after the announcement of the results of the entrance examinations to the University of Tokyo
12th-century illustrated handscroll of The Tale of Genji, a National Treasure
Noh performance at a Shinto shrine
Young ladies celebrate Coming of Age Day (成人の日) in Harajuku, Tokyo
A plate of nigiri-zushi
Sumo wrestlers form around the referee during the ring-entering ceremony
Japanese samurai boarding a Mongol vessel during the Mongol invasions of Japan, depicted in the, 1293
Skyscrapers in Nakanoshima, Osaka; a major financial centre in Japan

Island country in East Asia.

- Japan

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The three constitutional monarchs of the Scandinavian kingdoms of Sweden, Norway & Denmark gathered in November 1917 in Oslo.
From left to right: Gustaf V, Haakon VII & Christian X.

Constitutional monarchy

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Form of monarchy in which the monarch exercises their authority in accordance with a constitution and is not alone in deciding.

Form of monarchy in which the monarch exercises their authority in accordance with a constitution and is not alone in deciding.

The three constitutional monarchs of the Scandinavian kingdoms of Sweden, Norway & Denmark gathered in November 1917 in Oslo.
From left to right: Gustaf V, Haakon VII & Christian X.
A meeting in the Japanese privy council in 1946 led by emperor Hirohito.

Constitutional monarchies range from countries such as Liechtenstein, Monaco, Morocco, Jordan, Kuwait, and Bahrain, where the constitution grants substantial discretionary powers to the sovereign, to countries such as Australia, the United Kingdom, Canada, the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, Sweden, Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia, and Japan, where the monarch retains significantly less personal discretion in the exercise of their authority.

The Kuril Islands with Russian names. Borders of Shimoda Treaty (1855) and Treaty of St. Petersburg (1875) shown in red. Since 1945 all islands northeast of Hokkaido have been administered by Russia.

Kuril Islands dispute

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The Kuril Islands with Russian names. Borders of Shimoda Treaty (1855) and Treaty of St. Petersburg (1875) shown in red. Since 1945 all islands northeast of Hokkaido have been administered by Russia.
Disputed islands in question: Habomai Islands, Shikotan, Kunashiri (Kunashir) and Etorofu (Iturup)
Southern Kuril islands seen from the International Space Station
A 1939 map of the Pacific Rim. Dates shown indicate approximate time that the various powers gained control of their possessions
Japanese Iturup residents (then called Etorofu) and a Buddhist temple (before 1939)
Agreement regarding entry of the Soviet Union into the war against Japan
Russian President Dmitry Medvedev met local residents in Yuzhno-Kurilsk, 1 November 2010
Japanese people visiting their family graves on Tanfiliev Island (Suishō-jima), one of the Habomai Islands, 2008
A protest truck confronting the Japanese police near the Russian Embassy on August 9, 2015
A van covered with slogans calling for Japanese sovereignty over the Northern Territories (北方領土), 2006
The Ainu people were the original inhabitants of the Kuril Islands

The Kuril Islands dispute, known as the Northern Territories dispute in Japan, is a territorial dispute between Japan and the Russian Federation over the ownership of the four southernmost Kuril Islands.

Toyotomi Hideyoshi

Council of Five Elders

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Group of five powerful feudal lords (Japanese: 大名, Daimyō) formed in 1598 by the Regent (Japanese: 太閤 Taikō) Toyotomi Hideyoshi, shortly before his death the same year.

Group of five powerful feudal lords (Japanese: 大名, Daimyō) formed in 1598 by the Regent (Japanese: 太閤 Taikō) Toyotomi Hideyoshi, shortly before his death the same year.

Toyotomi Hideyoshi
The Tokugawa Clan's Crest (Mon)
The Toyotomi Clan's Crest (Mon)
Tokugawa Ieyasu
Ukita Hideie
Maeda Toshiie
Uesugi Kagekatsu
Mōri Terumoto
Kobayakawa Takakage
Toyotomi Hideyoshi

Tokugawa Ieyasu (Japanese: 徳川 家康) was the founder and first shōgun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan, which effectively ruled Japan from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until the Meiji Restoration in 1868.

Japanese diaspora

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View of passengers arriving in Vancouver aboard the steamship Kumeric
Japanese Filipina woman (left) wearing terno gowns (1920)
The Japanese community of the city of São Paulo, Brazil, traditionally lived in the Liberdade neighbourhood.
View of Ujo Nakano's farm house at Port Hammond, B.C.
List of passengers of the ship Kasato Maru bringing the first Japanese immigrants to Brazil, 1908.
Immigrants from Japan in Palmira, Cauca (Colombia)

The Japanese diaspora and its individual members, known as Nikkei (日系) or as Nikkeijin (日系人), comprise the Japanese emigrants from Japan (and their descendants) residing in a country outside Japan.

Tang Dynasty envoys from Baekje

Baekje

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Korean kingdom located in southwestern Korea from 18 BC to 660 AD. It was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo and Silla.

Korean kingdom located in southwestern Korea from 18 BC to 660 AD. It was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo and Silla.

Tang Dynasty envoys from Baekje
Korea in 375, the greatest territory expansion of Baekje.
Ambassador of Baekje at the Chinese court of Emperor Yuan of Liang in his capital Jingzhou in 516–520 CE, with explanatory text. Portraits of Periodical Offering of Liang, 11th century Song copy.
Replica of the Seven-pronged Sword Baekje gave to Yamato.
Guze Kannon is a buddhist statue made in the image of King Seong in the Korean style. The statue, originally come from Baekje, is kept in the Dream Hall at the Japanese temple Hōryū-ji.
Suda Hachiman Shrine Mirror looks like mirrors of Baekje
Baekje Cultural Land

It became a significant regional sea power, with political and trade relations with China and Japan.

Polo wearing a Tartar outfit, print from the 18th century

Marco Polo

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Venetian merchant, explorer and writer who travelled through Asia along the Silk Road between 1271 and 1295.

Venetian merchant, explorer and writer who travelled through Asia along the Silk Road between 1271 and 1295.

Polo wearing a Tartar outfit, print from the 18th century
XVI century portrait of Marco Polo
Corte Seconda del Milion is still named after the nickname of Polo, Il Milione
Mosaic of Marco Polo displayed in the Palazzo Doria-Tursi, in Genoa, Italy
Pietro d'Abano, philosopher, doctor and astrologer
San Lorenzo church in the sestiere of Castello (Venice), where Polo was buried. The photo shows the church as is today, after the 1592 rebuilding.
Plaque on Teatro Malibran, which was built upon Marco Polo's house
Statue of Marco Polo in Hangzhou, China
Polo meeting Kublai Khan.
A page from Il Milione, from a manuscript believed to date between 1298–1299.
Kublai Khan's court, from French "Livre des merveilles"
Text of the letter of Pope Innocent IV "to the ruler and people of the Tartars", brought to Güyüg Khan by John de Carpini, 1245
Seal of Güyük Khan using the classical Mongolian script, as found in a letter sent to the Roman Pope Innocent IV in 1246.
Letter from Arghun, Khan of the Mongol Ilkhanate, to Pope Nicholas IV, 1290.
Seal of the Mongol ruler Ghazan in a 1302 letter to Pope Boniface VIII, with an inscription in Chinese seal script
Handwritten notes by Christopher Columbus on a Latin edition of Polo's book.
The Fra Mauro map, published c. 1450 by the Venetian monk Fra Mauro.
Italian banknote, issued in 1982, portraying Marco Polo.

His travels are recorded in The Travels of Marco Polo (also known as Book of the Marvels of the World and Il Milione, c. 1300), a book that described to Europeans the then mysterious culture and inner workings of the Eastern world, including the wealth and great size of the Mongol Empire and China in the Yuan Dynasty, giving their first comprehensive look into China, Persia, India, Japan and other Asian cities and countries.

Picture of Kōbun

Emperor Kōbun

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Picture of Kōbun
Japanese Imperial kamon — a stylized chrysanthemum blossom

Emperor Kōbun (弘文天皇) was the 39th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

Chūgoku region

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Chūgoku region and Shikoku seen from the International Space Station
Chūgoku, satellite photo
Hiroshima City
Okayama City
Kurashiki City
Fukuyama City
Shimonoseki City
Kure City
Matsue City
Tottori City
Yamaguchi City

The Chūgoku region (中国地方), also known as the San'in-San'yō (山陰山陽地方) region, is the westernmost region of Honshū, the largest island of Japan.

The four damaged reactor buildings (from left: Units 4, 3, 2, and 1) on 16 March 2011. Hydrogen-air explosions in Units 1, 3, and 4 caused structural damage. Water vapor/"steam" venting prevented a similar explosion in Unit 2.

Fukushima nuclear disaster

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The four damaged reactor buildings (from left: Units 4, 3, 2, and 1) on 16 March 2011. Hydrogen-air explosions in Units 1, 3, and 4 caused structural damage. Water vapor/"steam" venting prevented a similar explosion in Unit 2.
Cross-section of a typical BWR Mark I containment as used in units 1 to 5.
RPV: reactor pressure vessel
DW: drywell enclosing reactor pressure vessel.
WW: wetwell – torus-shaped all around the base enclosing steam suppression pool. Excess steam from the drywell enters the wetwell water pool via downcomer pipes.
SFP: spent fuel pool area
SCSW: secondary concrete shield wall
Diagram of the cooling systems of a BWR
The height of the tsunami that struck the station approximately 50 minutes after the earthquake.
A: Power station buildings
B: Peak height of tsunami
C: Ground level of site
D: Average sea level
E: Seawall to block waves
Aerial view of the station in 1975, showing separation between units 5 and 6, and 1–4. Unit 6, not completed until 1979, is seen under construction.
Unit 4 after the hydrogen explosion. The bright yellow object is the reactor's removed Primary Containment Vessel head or drywell lid. The removed large black Reactor Pressure Vessel head with its lifting frame attached is to the left. Both had been removed to allow refueling at the time. The green object is the crane for the spent fuel pool.
The Fukushima No.1 reactor control room in 1999
Map of contaminated areas around the plant (22 March – 3 April 2011)
Radiation measurements from Fukushima Prefecture, March 2011
Seawater-contamination along coast with Caesium-137, from 21 March until 5 May 2011 (Source: GRS)
Radiation hotspot in Kashiwa, February 2012
Calculated cesium-137 concentration in the air, 19 March 2011
Comparison of radiation levels for different nuclear events
The town of Namie (population 21,000) was evacuated as a result of the disaster
IAEA team examining Unit 3
Protest against nuclear power in Berlin, Germany, March 2011
The number of nuclear power plant constructions started each year worldwide, from 1954 to 2013. Following an increase in new constructions from 2007 to 2010, there was a decline after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.
Electricity generation by source in Japan (month-level data). Nuclear energy's contribution declined steadily throughout 2011 due to shutdowns and has been mainly replaced with thermal power stations such as fossil gas and coal power plants.
The use of nuclear power (in yellow) in Japan declined significantly after the Fukushima accident
Part of the Seto Hill Windfarm in Japan, one of several windfarms that continued generating without interruption after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami and the Fukushima nuclear disaster
Price of PV modules (yen/Wp) in Japan
Anti-nuclear power plant rally on 19 September 2011 at the Meiji Shrine complex in Tokyo
Japan towns, villages, and cities in and around the Daiichi nuclear plant exclusion zone. The 20 and 30 km areas had evacuation and shelter in place orders, and additional administrative districts that had an evacuation order are highlighted. However, the above map's factual accuracy is called into question as only the southern portion of Kawamata district had evacuation orders. More accurate maps are available.
IAEA experts at Unit 4, 2013
Evacuation flight departs Misawa
U.S. Navy humanitarian flight undergoes radioactive decontamination
Protest against nuclear power in Cologne, Germany on 26 March 2011

The Fukushima nuclear disaster was a 2011 nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Ōkuma, Fukushima, Japan.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga announces the new Imperial era "Reiwa" to the press.

2019 Japanese imperial transition

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Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga announces the new Imperial era "Reiwa" to the press.
Emperor Naruhito during the Enthronement Ceremony

The 2019 Japanese imperial transition occurred on 30 April 2019 when the then 85-year-old Emperor Akihito of Japan abdicated from the Chrysanthemum Throne after reigning for 30 years, becoming the first Emperor of Japan to do so since 1817.