Japan women's national football team

JapanJapan national teamJapan women's national teamJapan WomenJapanese internationalJapanese national teamNational teamJapan U-20Japan Women's Football TeamJapan women's national soccer team
The Japan women's national football team, or Nadeshiko Japan, represents Japan in women's association football and is run by the Japan Football Association (JFA).wikipedia
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2015 FIFA Women's World Cup

20152015 FIFA World Cup2015 World Cup
It won silver medals at the 2012 Summer Olympics and the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, making it the only Asian team to have three combined medals from international championships.
The tournament began on 6 June 2015, and finished with the final on 5 July 2015 with a United States victory over Japan.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Final

Final20112011 final
Nadeshiko Japan defeated the United States in the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Final, thus claiming their first FIFA Women's World Cup title, becoming the first Asian team to do so and only the fourth women's world champions. Japan qualified for the finals by finishing third in the 2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup.
It was played between Japan and the United States.

FIFA Women's World Cup

World CupWomen's World CupWorld Cups
Nadeshiko Japan defeated the United States in the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Final, thus claiming their first FIFA Women's World Cup title, becoming the first Asian team to do so and only the fourth women's world champions. They became the first Asian team to subsequently win both the FIFA Women's World Cup and AFC Women's Asian Cup.
The other winners are Germany, with two titles, and Japan and Norway with one title each.

2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup

20142014 Asian CupAFC Women's Asian Cup
It also won gold medals at the 2014 and 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cups, the 2010 and 2018 Asian Games, and the 2008 and 2010 EAFF Women's Football Championships.
Reigning world champions Japan defeated the reigning Asian champions Australia 1–0 in the final to secure their first continental title.

United States women's national soccer team

United StatesUnited States women's national teamUSA
Nadeshiko Japan defeated the United States in the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Final, thus claiming their first FIFA Women's World Cup title, becoming the first Asian team to do so and only the fourth women's world champions.
In their first Mundialito under Dorrance, the United States defeated China, Brazil, and Japan before finishing as runners-up to Italy.

2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup

20182018 Asian CupAFC Women's Asian Cup
It also won gold medals at the 2014 and 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cups, the 2010 and 2018 Asian Games, and the 2008 and 2010 EAFF Women's Football Championships.
Japan defeated Australia 1–0 in the final to win their second consecutive title.

Nadeshiko League

L.LeagueL. LeagueJapan Women's Football League
In 1989, the "Japan Women's Football League" (abbreviated to "L. League") was established, and the women's national team qualified for the "1991 FIFA Women's World Cup" in China.
After Japan's World Cup win in 2011 the L. League saw an upsurge in popularity.

2010 EAFF Women's Football Championship

20102010 EAFF Women's Football Championship Qual.2010 EAFF Championship
It also won gold medals at the 2014 and 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cups, the 2010 and 2018 Asian Games, and the 2008 and 2010 EAFF Women's Football Championships.

Seiki Ichihara

In 1981, Japan Football Association formed first national team for 1981 AFC Women's Championship and Seiki Ichihara managed as first Japan national team manager.
He managed Japan women's national team.

2008 EAFF Women's Football Championship

2008Women's East Asian Cup 20082008 East Asian Women's Football Championship
It also won gold medals at the 2014 and 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cups, the 2010 and 2018 Asian Games, and the 2008 and 2010 EAFF Women's Football Championships.
Japan won the second edition by beating its opponents to finish first, DPR Korea finished second.

2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup

20102010 Asian Cup2010 placement
Japan qualified for the finals by finishing third in the 2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup.
The winners, Australia, runners-up, Korea DPR, and third-place team, Japan qualified for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Ryohei Suzuki (footballer)

Ryohei Suzuki
In January 1986, Ryohei Suzuki became first full-time manager for national team.
He managed Japan women's national team.

Carli Lloyd

Lloyd
In a rematch of the World Cup final, Japan was defeated in the Olympic final by a score of 1–2 against the United States, allowing two goals to Carli Lloyd in the 8th and 54th minutes.
During the United States' 5–2 win over Japan in the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Final, Lloyd became the first player ever to score three goals in a FIFA Women's World Cup final and the second soccer player ever to score a hat-trick in any senior FIFA World Cup Final, after Geoff Hurst.

Azusa Iwashimizu

Iwashimizu
In the final, they met Australia once again and successfully earned a 1–0 win with Azusa Iwashimizu's goal.
She played for Japan national team.

Eiji Ueda

In August 2002, the Japan Football Association appointed Eiji Ueda, who had been coach for the Macau national football team, as the new head coach.
He managed the Japan women's national team.

AFC Women's Asian Cup

AFC Women's ChampionshipAsian CupWomen's Asian Cup
They became the first Asian team to subsequently win both the FIFA Women's World Cup and AFC Women's Asian Cup.
19 tournaments have been held, with the current champions being Japan.

Asian Football Confederation

AsiaAFCAFC (Asia)
It is the most successful women's national team from the Asian Football Confederation.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup

20112011 World Cup2011 FIFA World Cup
Japan won the final against the United States on a penalty shoot-out following a 2–2 draw after extra time and became the first Asian team to win a senior FIFA World Cup.

Germany women's national football team

GermanyGerman national teamWest Germany
Japan was dropped with Germany, Canada and Argentina during 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup.
At the 1995 Women's World Cup in Sweden, the German team lost against the Scandinavian hosts, but still succeeded in winning their group by beating Japan and Brazil.

Takao Orii

In 1984, national team was formed for the first time in three years for a China expedition, and Takao Orii managed national team.
He managed Japan women's national team.