Japanese martial arts

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Japanese martial arts refer to the variety of martial arts native to the country of Japan.wikipedia
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Samurai

bushibukewarrior
The historical origin of Japanese martial arts can be found in the warrior traditions of the samurai and the caste system that restricted the use of weapons by other members of society.
While the samurai numbered less than 10% of then Japan's population, their teachings can still be found today in both everyday life and in modern Japanese martial arts.

Ko-ryū

koryūkoryuTraditional
That said, Japanese martial arts may generally be divided into koryū and gendai budō based on whether they existed prior to or after the Meiji Restoration, respectively.
Ko-ryū is a Japanese term for Japanese martial arts that predate the Meiji Restoration (1868).

Naginatajutsu

NaginataNaginata-doNaginata-jutsu
Since gendai budō and koryū often share the same historical origin, one will find various types of martial arts (such as jujutsu, kenjutsu, or naginatajutsu) on both sides of the divide.
Naginatajutsu (長刀術 or 薙刀術) is the Japanese martial art of wielding the naginata .

Gendai budō

gendaigendai budomodern
That said, Japanese martial arts may generally be divided into koryū and gendai budō based on whether they existed prior to or after the Meiji Restoration, respectively.
or Shinbudō, literally meaning "new budo" are both terms referring to modern Japanese martial arts, which were established after the Meiji Restoration (1866–1869).

Aikido

aikidōAi Ki DoAiki
Various methods of jujutsu have been incorporated or synthesized into judo and aikido, as well as being exported throughout the world and transformed into sport wrestling systems, adopted in whole or part by schools of karate or other unrelated martial arts, still practiced as they were centuries ago, or all of the above.
Aikido is a modern Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba as a synthesis of his martial studies, philosophy, and religious beliefs.

Kata

formsKarate kataform
Historically practiced with wooden katana (bokken), this most often consists of pre-determined forms, called kata, or sometimes called kumitachi, and similar to the partner drills practiced in kendo. Kano took the koryū martial arts he learned (specifically Kitō-ryū and Tenjin Shin'yo-ryū jujutsu), and systematically reinvented them into a martial art with an emphasis on freestyle practice (randori) and competition, while removing harmful jujutsu techniques or limiting them to the kata.
Kata are used by most Japanese and Okinawan martial arts, such as aikido, judo, kendo, kenpo, and karate.

Jujutsu

jiu-jitsujujitsujiu jitsu
Since gendai budō and koryū often share the same historical origin, one will find various types of martial arts (such as jujutsu, kenjutsu, or naginatajutsu) on both sides of the divide.
Jujutsu (柔術, jūjutsu ), also known as Jujitsu or Jiu-Jitsu, is a Japanese martial art and a method of close combat for defeating an opponent in which one uses either a short weapon or none.

Ninjutsu

ninjitsuninpoNinja
Shinobi no jutsu (aka Ninjutsu) was developed by groups of people mainly from Iga, Mie and Kōka, Shiga of Japan who became noted for their skills as Infiltrators, scouts, secret agents, and spies.
Ninjutsu was a separate discipline in some traditional Japanese schools, which integrated study of more conventional martial arts (taijutsu) along with shurikenjutsu, kenjutsu, sōjutsu, bōjutsu and others.

Japan

🇯🇵JPNJapanese
Shinobi no jutsu (aka Ninjutsu) was developed by groups of people mainly from Iga, Mie and Kōka, Shiga of Japan who became noted for their skills as Infiltrators, scouts, secret agents, and spies. Japanese martial arts refer to the variety of martial arts native to the country of Japan.
Traditional Japanese arts include crafts such as ceramics, textiles, lacquerware, swords and dolls; performances of bunraku, kabuki, noh, dance, and rakugo; and other practices, the tea ceremony, ikebana, martial arts, calligraphy, origami, onsen, Geisha and games.

Shintō Musō-ryū

Ise Jitoku Tenshin-ryūKaminoda TsunemoriShimizu Takaji
Usually they were studied as secondary or tertiary weapons within a school but there are exceptions, such as the art of wielding the short staff, (jōdō) which was the primary art taught by the Shintō Musō-ryū.
Shintō Musō-ryū, or Shindō Musō-ryū, most commonly known by its practice of jōdō, is a traditional school (koryū) of the Japanese martial art of jōjutsu, or the art of wielding the short staff (jō). The technical purpose of the art is to learn how to defeat a swordsman in combat using the jō, with an emphasis on proper combative distance, timing and concentration.

Jōdō

jodojojutsujōjutsu
Usually they were studied as secondary or tertiary weapons within a school but there are exceptions, such as the art of wielding the short staff, (jōdō) which was the primary art taught by the Shintō Musō-ryū.
Jōdō, meaning "the way of the jō", or jōjutsu is a Japanese martial art using a short staff called jō.

Katana

samurai swordswordsamurai swords
In Japan, the use of the katana is no different.
In Japan, from 1945 to 1953, sword manufacture and sword-related martial arts were banned.

Kanō Jigorō

Jigoro KanoJigorō KanōKano
Judo was created by Kano Jigoro (嘉納 治五郎 Kanō Jigorō, 1860–1938) at the end of the 19th century.
Judo was the first Japanese martial art to gain widespread international recognition, and the first to become an official Olympic sport.

Randori

freestyle practicesparring
Kano took the koryū martial arts he learned (specifically Kitō-ryū and Tenjin Shin'yo-ryū jujutsu), and systematically reinvented them into a martial art with an emphasis on freestyle practice (randori) and competition, while removing harmful jujutsu techniques or limiting them to the kata.
Randori is a term used in Japanese martial arts to describe free-style practice.

Kitō-ryū

Kito School
Kano took the koryū martial arts he learned (specifically Kitō-ryū and Tenjin Shin'yo-ryū jujutsu), and systematically reinvented them into a martial art with an emphasis on freestyle practice (randori) and competition, while removing harmful jujutsu techniques or limiting them to the kata.
Kitō-ryū is a traditional school (koryū) of the Japanese martial art of jujutsu.

Kenjutsu

swordsmanshipJapanese swordsmanshipsword fighting
Since gendai budō and koryū often share the same historical origin, one will find various types of martial arts (such as jujutsu, kenjutsu, or naginatajutsu) on both sides of the divide.
Japanese martial arts

Morihei Ueshiba

Ueshiba Moriheio-senseiŌsensei
It is a Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba (植芝 盛平 Ueshiba Morihei, 1883 – 1969).
Morihei Ueshiba was a martial artist and founder of the Japanese martial art of aikido.

Bōgu

bogukendo armorkendo equipment
Kendo really began to take shape with the introduction of bamboo swords, called shinai, and the set of lightweight wooden armour, called bogu, by Naganuma Sirōzaemon Kunisato (長沼 四郎左衛門 国郷, 1688–1767), which allowed for the practice of strikes at full speed and power without risk of injury to the competitors.
Bōgu, properly called kendōgu, is training armour used primarily in the Japanese martial art of kendo, with variants used for jukendo, tankendo, and naginata.

Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu

aikijutsuaikijujutsuaiki-jujutsu
Morihei Ueshiba developed aikido mainly from Daitō-ryū aiki-jūjutsu incorporating training movements such as those for the yari (spear), jō (a short quarterstaff), and perhaps also juken (bayonet).
Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu, originally called Daitō-ryū Jujutsu, is a Japanese martial art that first became widely known in the early 20th century under the headmastership of Takeda Sōkaku.

joDaï-joJo stick
Morihei Ueshiba developed aikido mainly from Daitō-ryū aiki-jūjutsu incorporating training movements such as those for the yari (spear), jō (a short quarterstaff), and perhaps also juken (bayonet).
A jō is an approximately 1.27 m wooden staff, used in some Japanese martial arts.

Suijutsu

Examples of these include marine skills such as swimming and river-fording (suijutsu), equestrianism (bajutsu), arson and demolition (kajutsu).
Suijutsu or suieijutsu is the Japanese martial art of combative swimming.

List of Japanese martial arts

List of Japanese martial arts
The following is a list of styles or schools in Japanese martial arts.

Martial arts

martial artistmartial artmartial artists
Japanese martial arts refer to the variety of martial arts native to the country of Japan.
Sometimes, training with one specific weapon will be considered a style of martial arts in its own right, which is especially the case in Japanese martial arts with disciplines such as kenjutsu and kendo (sword), bojutsu (staff), and kyudo (archery).

Shuhari

preserve
The principle of Shuhari describes the three stages of learning.
Shuhari (Kanji: 守破離 Hiragana: しゅはり) is a Japanese martial art concept which describes the stages of learning to mastery.

Tenjin Shin'yō-ryū

Tenjin Shin’yō-ryū of the Inoue Keitarō-lineageTenjin Shin'yo RyuTenjin Shin'yo-ryū
Kano took the koryū martial arts he learned (specifically Kitō-ryū and Tenjin Shin'yo-ryū jujutsu), and systematically reinvented them into a martial art with an emphasis on freestyle practice (randori) and competition, while removing harmful jujutsu techniques or limiting them to the kata.