Japanese name

Japanese given nameiminaJapanesegiven namesurnameJapanese surnameJapanese family namefamily nameJapanese personal namesEastern convention
Japanese names in modern times usually consist of a family name (surname), followed by a given name.wikipedia
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Satō

The three most common family names in Japan are Satō, Suzuki, and Takahashi . Examples include Atō, Andō, Itō (although a different final kanji is also common), Udō, Etō, Endō, Gotō, Jitō, Katō, Kitō, Kudō, Kondō, Saitō, Satō, Shindō, Sudō, Naitō, Bitō, and Mutō.
Satō is the most common Japanese surname, often romanized as Sato,Saato,Satoh or Satou. Notable people with the surname include:

Suzuki (surname)

Suzuki
The three most common family names in Japan are Satō, Suzuki, and Takahashi .
Suzuki is a common Japanese surname meaning "bell wood", "bell tree" or "bud tree".

Takahashi

The three most common family names in Japan are Satō, Suzuki, and Takahashi .
Takahashi (written: 高橋 lit. "high bridge") is the third most common Japanese surname.

Surname

family nameoccupational surnamelast name
Japanese names in modern times usually consist of a family name (surname), followed by a given name.
The latter is often called the Eastern order because Europeans are most familiar with the examples from the East Asian cultural sphere, specifically Japan, China (mainland and Taiwan), Korea (Republic of Korea and Democratic People's Republic of Korea) and Vietnam.

Ichirō

as his name indicates
Male names often end in -rō (郎 "son", but also 朗 "clear, bright"; e.g. "Ichirō") -ta (太 "great, thick"; e.g. "Kenta") or -o (男 / 雄 / 夫 "man"; e.g. "Teruo" or "Akio"), or contain ichi (一 "first [son]"; e.g. "Ken'ichi"), kazu (also written with 一 "first [son]", along with several other possible characters; e.g. "Kazuhiro"), ji (二 "second [son]" or 次 "next"; e.g. "Jirō"), or dai (大 "great, large"; e.g. "Daiichi").
Ichirō, also written Ichiro, Ichirou or Ichiroh is a masculine Japanese given name.

Ken'ichi

Male names often end in -rō (郎 "son", but also 朗 "clear, bright"; e.g. "Ichirō") -ta (太 "great, thick"; e.g. "Kenta") or -o (男 / 雄 / 夫 "man"; e.g. "Teruo" or "Akio"), or contain ichi (一 "first [son]"; e.g. "Ken'ichi"), kazu (also written with 一 "first [son]", along with several other possible characters; e.g. "Kazuhiro"), ji (二 "second [son]" or 次 "next"; e.g. "Jirō"), or dai (大 "great, large"; e.g. "Daiichi").
Ken'ichi or Kenichi is a very common masculine Japanese given name.

Keiko (given name)

Keiko
Female names often end in -ko (子 "child"; e.g. "Keiko") or -mi (美 "beauty"; e.g. "Yumi").
Keiko is a feminine Japanese given name.

Jiro (given name)

JirouJirō次郎
Male names often end in -rō (郎 "son", but also 朗 "clear, bright"; e.g. "Ichirō") -ta (太 "great, thick"; e.g. "Kenta") or -o (男 / 雄 / 夫 "man"; e.g. "Teruo" or "Akio"), or contain ichi (一 "first [son]"; e.g. "Ken'ichi"), kazu (also written with 一 "first [son]", along with several other possible characters; e.g. "Kazuhiro"), ji (二 "second [son]" or 次 "next"; e.g. "Jirō"), or dai (大 "great, large"; e.g. "Daiichi").
Jirō or Jiro is a stand-alone Japanese given name along with "Tarō", and a common name suffix for males.

Reika

Other popular endings for female names include -ka (香 "scent, perfume" or 花 "flower"; e.g. "Reika") and -na (奈, or 菜, meaning "greens" or "apple tree"; e.g. "Haruna").
Reika is a Japanese given name for females.

Itō (surname)

Itō
Examples include Atō, Andō, Itō (although a different final kanji is also common), Udō, Etō, Endō, Gotō, Jitō, Katō, Kitō, Kudō, Kondō, Saitō, Satō, Shindō, Sudō, Naitō, Bitō, and Mutō.
Itō, Ito, Itou, Itoh or Itoo (written: 伊藤) is the sixth most common Japanese surname.

Gotō (surname)

Gotō
Examples include Atō, Andō, Itō (although a different final kanji is also common), Udō, Etō, Endō, Gotō, Jitō, Katō, Kitō, Kudō, Kondō, Saitō, Satō, Shindō, Sudō, Naitō, Bitō, and Mutō.
Gotō, also spelled Gotou or Gotoh, is a Japanese surname.

Endo (surname)

Endō
Examples include Atō, Andō, Itō (although a different final kanji is also common), Udō, Etō, Endō, Gotō, Jitō, Katō, Kitō, Kudō, Kondō, Saitō, Satō, Shindō, Sudō, Naitō, Bitō, and Mutō.
Endō also spelled Endo, Endoh, or Endou, is a Japanese surname.

Kudo

Kudō
Examples include Atō, Andō, Itō (although a different final kanji is also common), Udō, Etō, Endō, Gotō, Jitō, Katō, Kitō, Kudō, Kondō, Saitō, Satō, Shindō, Sudō, Naitō, Bitō, and Mutō.
Kudō (工藤; Kudo, Kudoh, Kudou) is a Japanese family name.

Hajime

The name "Hajime" may be written with any of the following: 始, 治, 初, 一, 元, 肇, 創, 甫, 基, 哉, 啓, 本, 源, 東, 大, 孟, or 祝.
Hajime is also a common Japanese given name for males, although it is occasionally used as a surname.

Tanaka

Some common names are summarized by the phrase tanakamura ("the village in the middle of the rice fields"): the three kanji: 田 (ta, rice field), 中 (naka, middle) and 村 (mura, village), together in any pair, form a simple, reasonably common surname: Tanaka, Nakamura, Murata, Nakata (Nakada), Muranaka, Tamura.
Tanaka is the fourth most common Japanese surname, written with the kanji for ricefield & middle .

Nakamura (surname)

Nakamura
Some common names are summarized by the phrase tanakamura ("the village in the middle of the rice fields"): the three kanji: 田 (ta, rice field), 中 (naka, middle) and 村 (mura, village), together in any pair, form a simple, reasonably common surname: Tanaka, Nakamura, Murata, Nakata (Nakada), Muranaka, Tamura.
Nakamura is the eighth most common Japanese surname.

Nanori

read
Many others use readings which are only used in names (nanori), such as the female name Nozomi .
Nanori are kanji character readings (pronunciations) found almost exclusively in Japanese names.

Katakana

kanakatakana scriptアィヌ
The kanji for a name may have a variety of possible Japanese pronunciations, hence parents might use hiragana or katakana when giving a birth name to their newborn child.
Some Japanese personal names are written in katakana.

Given name

néefirst name
Japanese names in modern times usually consist of a family name (surname), followed by a given name.
Many female Japanese names end in -ko, meaning "child".

Galton–Watson process

Surname extinctioncompletely died outextinction of family names
The recent introduction of surnames has two additional effects: Japanese names became widespread when the country had a very large population (over 30 million during the early Meiji era – see Demographics of Imperial Japan) instead of dating to ancient times (estimated population at 1 CE is 300,000, for instance – see Demographics of Japan before Meiji Restoration), and since little time has passed, Japanese names have not experienced as significant a surname extinction as has occurred in the much longer history in China.
Japanese names, which in general use date only to the Meiji restoration in the late 19th century (when the population was over 30,000,000), have over 100,000 family names, surnames are very varied, and the government restricts married couples to using the same surname.

Japanese language

JapaneseJapanese-languageJp
Japanese names are usually written in kanji, which are characters usually Chinese in origin but Japanese in pronunciation.
Japanese name

Chinese surname

ancestral nameClan nameSurname
This diversity is in stark contrast to the situation in other nations of the East Asian cultural sphere, which reflects a different history: while Chinese surnames have been in use for millennia and were often reflective of an entire clan or adopted from nobles (with or without any genetic relationship) and were thence transferred to Korea and Vietnam via noble names, the vast majority of modern Japanese family names date only to the 19th century, following the Meiji restoration, and were chosen at will.
Japanese name

Emperor Jomei

JomeiPrince Tamura
Prior to Emperor Jomei, the imina of the emperors were very long and not used.
Before Jomei's ascension to the Chrysanthemum Throne, his personal name (imina) was Tamura or Prince Tamura .

Rendaku

changed toin compoundsmay become voiced
The kanji 藤, meaning wisteria, has the on'yomi tō (or, with rendaku, dō). Many Japanese people have surnames that include this kanji as the second character.
Rendaku thus remains partially unpredictable, sometimes presenting a problem even to native speakers, particularly in Japanese names, where rendaku occurs or fails to occur often without obvious cause.

Shikona

ring namefighting namesumo name
Sumo wrestlers take wrestling names called shikona (醜名 or 四股名).
As with standard Japanese names, a shikona consists of the equivalent of a 'surname' and a 'given' name, and the full name is written surname first.