Japanese sword

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A Japanese sword is one of several types of traditionally made swords from Japan.wikipedia
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Katana

samurai swordswordsamurai swords
Some of the more commonly known types of Japanese swords are the katana, wakizashi, odachi, and tachi. In modern times the most commonly known type of Japanese sword is the Shinogi-Zukuri katana, which is a single-edged and usually curved longsword traditionally worn by samurai from the 15th century onwards.
Katana can also be known as dai or daitō among Western sword enthusiasts although daitō is a generic name for any Japanese long sword, literally meaning "big sword".

Wakizashi

short swordcompanion swordkatana
Some of the more commonly known types of Japanese swords are the katana, wakizashi, odachi, and tachi. Other types of Japanese swords include: tsurugi or ken, which is a double-edged sword; ōdachi, tachi, which are older styles of a very long single-edged sword; wakizashi, a medium-sized sword and tantō which is an even smaller knife-sized sword. 1–2 shaku for Shōtō (wakizashi or kodachi).
The wakizashi is one of the traditionally made Japanese swords (nihontō) worn by the samurai in feudal Japan.

Tachi

AratakaKenpredecessor of the sword her mother is named for
Some of the more commonly known types of Japanese swords are the katana, wakizashi, odachi, and tachi. Other types of Japanese swords include: tsurugi or ken, which is a double-edged sword; ōdachi, tachi, which are older styles of a very long single-edged sword; wakizashi, a medium-sized sword and tantō which is an even smaller knife-sized sword.
A tachi was a type of traditionally made Japanese sword (nihonto) worn by the samurai class of feudal Japan.

Tantō

tantoAikuchiDagger
Other types of Japanese swords include: tsurugi or ken, which is a double-edged sword; ōdachi, tachi, which are older styles of a very long single-edged sword; wakizashi, a medium-sized sword and tantō which is an even smaller knife-sized sword.
A tantō is one of the traditionally made Japanese swords (nihonto) that were worn by the samurai class of feudal Japan.

Naginata

glaiveko-naginatapikes
Naginata and yari despite being polearms are still considered to be swords.
The naginata is one of several varieties of traditionally made Japanese blades (nihonto) in the form of a pole weapon.

Sword

swordsbeam swordblade
A Japanese sword is one of several types of traditionally made swords from Japan.
Production of the Japanese tachi, a precursor to the katana, is recorded from c. AD 900 (see Japanese sword).

Yari

spearEnsio Hienonenhalberds
Naginata and yari despite being polearms are still considered to be swords.
The blades were made of the same steel (tamahagane) that traditional Japanese swords and arrow heads were forged with, and were very durable.

Ōdachi

nodachiodachino-dachi
Some of the more commonly known types of Japanese swords are the katana, wakizashi, odachi, and tachi. Other types of Japanese swords include: tsurugi or ken, which is a double-edged sword; ōdachi, tachi, which are older styles of a very long single-edged sword; wakizashi, a medium-sized sword and tantō which is an even smaller knife-sized sword.
An ōdachi (large/great sword) or nodachi (野太刀, field sword) was a type of traditionally made Japanese sword (日本刀, nihontō) used by the samurai class of feudal Japan.

Japan

🇯🇵JPNJapanese
A Japanese sword is one of several types of traditionally made swords from Japan.
Traditional Japanese arts include crafts such as ceramics, textiles, lacquerware, swords and dolls; performances of bunraku, kabuki, noh, dance, and rakugo; and other practices, the tea ceremony, ikebana, martial arts, calligraphy, origami, onsen, Geisha and games.

Kodachi

1–2 shaku for Shōtō (wakizashi or kodachi).
A kodachi, literally translating into "small or short tachi (sword)", is one of the traditionally made Japanese swords (nihontō) used by the samurai class of feudal Japan.

Daishō

daishotwo swordsmatched pair
A shōtō and a daitō together are called a daishō (literally, "big-little" ).
The etymology of the word daishō becomes apparent when the terms daitō, meaning long sword, and shōtō, meaning short sword, are used; daitō + shōtō = daishō.

Samurai

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In modern times the most commonly known type of Japanese sword is the Shinogi-Zukuri katana, which is a single-edged and usually curved longsword traditionally worn by samurai from the 15th century onwards.
Japanese swords (samurai sword) are the weapons that have come to be synonymous with the samurai. Ancient Japanese swords from the Nara period (Chokutō) featured a straight blade, by the late 900s curved tachi appeared, followed by the uchigatana and ultimately the katana. Smaller commonly known companion swords are the wakizashi and the tantō. Wearing a long sword (katana) or (tachi) together with a smaller sword such as a wakizashi or tantō became the symbol of the samurai, this combination of swords is referred to as a daishō (literally "big and small"). During the Edo period only samurai were allowed to wear a daisho. A longer blade known as the nodachi was also used in the fourteenth century, though primarily used by samurai on the ground.

Chokutō

chokutotachi
Early examples of swords were straight chokutō or jōkotō and others with unusual shapes, some of styles and techniques probably are derived from Chinese swords, and some of them are directly imported through trade.
The chokutō is a straight, one-edged Japanese sword that was produced prior to the 9th century.

Ya (arrow)

yaarrowsyajiri
Arrowheads for war, yajiri (or yanone).
Ya used in war by the samurai had a variety of tips called yajiri or yanone; these arrowheads were forged using the same steel (tamahagane) and methods as traditional Japanese swords.

Uchigatana

uchi-gatana
In the 15th and 16th centuries, samurai who increasingly found a need for a sword for use in closer quarters along with increasing use of foot-soldiers armed with spears led to the creation of the uchigatana, in both one-handed and two-handed forms.
An uchigatana is a type of Japanese sword worn by the samurai class of feudal Japan.

Guntō

shin guntōswordsgunto
In 1934 the Japanese government issued a military specification for the shin guntō (new army sword), the first version of which was the Type 94 Katana, and many machine- and hand-crafted swords used in World War II conformed to this and later shin guntō specifications.
Guntō is a Japanese sword produced for use by the Japanese army and navy after the end of the samurai era in 1868.

Haitōrei Edict

Haitōreiban on carrying swordscarrying a sword in public
The Haitōrei Edict in 1876 all but banned carrying swords and guns on streets.
Violators would have their swords confiscated.

Glossary of Japanese swords

Glossary of Japanese swords
This is the glossary of Japanese swords, including major terms the casual reader might find useful in understanding articles on Japanese swords.

Japanese sword mountings

tsubasayashikomizue
In Japanese, the scabbard is referred to as a saya, and the handguard piece, often intricately designed as an individual work of art—especially in later years of the Edo period—was called the tsuba.
Japanese sword mountings are the various housings and associated fittings (tosogu) that hold the blade of a Japanese sword when it is being worn or stored.

Kenjutsu

swordsmanshipJapanese swordsmanshipsword fighting
Kenjutsu is the Japanese martial art of using the nihontō in combat.
A distinguishing feature of many kenjutsu syllabi is the use of a paired katana or daitō and wakizashi or shōtō commonly referred to as nitōjutsu .

Tameshigiri

test cuttingcut the torso of a cadaversword-testing
Testing of swords, called tameshigiri, was practiced on a variety of materials (often the bodies of executed criminals) to test the sword's sharpness and practice cutting technique.
The kanji literally mean "test cut" (kun'yomi: ためし ぎり tameshi giri). This practice was popularized in the Edo period (17th century) for testing the quality of Japanese swords.

List of National Treasures of Japan (crafts: swords)

Rai Kuniyuki
List of National Treasures of Japan (crafts-swords)
The transition from straight jokotō or chokutō to deliberately curved, and much more refined Japanese swords (nihontō), occurred gradually over a long period of time, although few extant swords from the transition period exist.

Tatara (furnace)

tataratatara furnaceTatara furnaces
Tatara (furnace)
The steel, or tamahagane, used to forge Japanese swords (nihontō, commonly known as katana by contemporary Japanese forge masters like Kihara Akira and Gassan Sadatoshi is still smelted in a tatara.

Types of swords

List of types of swordsshort swordsword
Types of swords: Various types of swords in other countries as well as Japan
Nihonto

Iaitō

iaito
Alternatively, they can be termed shinken when they are designed for combat as opposed to iaitō training swords.
(This also explains why nihontō exported outside Japan must go through a declassification process before their exportation).