Japanese yen

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The yen is the official currency of Japan.wikipedia
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Currency

currenciesforeign currencycoinage
The yen is the official currency of Japan.
Under this definition, U.S. dollars (US$), euros, Japanese yen, and pounds sterling are examples of currencies.

Pound sterling

£GBPpounds
It is also widely used as a reserve currency after the U.S. dollar, the euro, and the pound sterling.
Sterling is the fourth most-traded currency in the foreign exchange market, after the United States dollar, the euro, and the Japanese yen.

Exchange rate

exchange ratesreal exchange rateforeign exchange rate
To stabilize the Japanese economy the exchange rate of the yen was fixed at ¥360 per $1 as part of the Bretton Woods system. That exchange rate was maintained until 1971, when the United States abandoned the gold standard, which had been a key element of the Bretton Woods System, and imposed a 10 percent surcharge on imports, setting in motion changes that eventually led to floating exchange rates in 1973.
For example, an interbank exchange rate of 114 Japanese yen to the United States dollar means that ¥114 will be exchanged for each US$1 or that US$1 will be exchanged for each ¥114.

Bank of Japan

BOJCentral BankJapan
To bring an end to this situation, the Bank of Japan was founded in 1882 and given a monopoly on controlling the money supply.
Prior to the Restoration, Japan's feudal fiefs all issued their own money, hansatsu, in an array of incompatible denominations, but the New Currency Act of Meiji 4 (1871) did away with these and established the yen as the new decimal currency, which had parity with the Mexican silver dollar.

South Korean won

wonKRW
Yen derives from the Japanese word, which borrows its phonetic reading from Chinese yuan, similar to North Korean won and South Korean won.
The old "won" was a cognate of the Chinese yuan and Japanese yen.

Plaza Accord

Plaza Accord of 1985
The Plaza Accord of 1985 temporarily changed this situation: the exchange rate fell from its average of ¥239 per US$1 in 1985 to ¥128 in 1988 and led to a peak rate of ¥80 against the U.S. dollar in 1995, effectively increasing the value of Japan’s GDP in US dollar terms to almost that of the United States.
The Plaza Accord was a joint-agreement, signed on 22 September 1985, at the Plaza Hotel in New York City, between France, West Germany, Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom, to depreciate the U.S. dollar in relation to the Japanese yen and German Deutsche mark by intervening in currency markets.

North Korean won

wonwŏncurrency
Yen derives from the Japanese word, which borrows its phonetic reading from Chinese yuan, similar to North Korean won and South Korean won.
Won is a cognate of the Chinese yuan and Japanese yen.

Renminbi

yuanRMB¥
Yen derives from the Japanese word, which borrows its phonetic reading from Chinese yuan, similar to North Korean won and South Korean won.
The latter may be written CN¥ to distinguish it from other currencies with the same symbol (such as the Japanese yen).

Spanish dollar

pieces of eightSpanish dollarsSpanish milled dollar
Originally, the Chinese had traded silver in mass called sycees and when Spanish and Mexican silver coins arrived, the Chinese called them "silver rounds" for their circular shapes.
Aside from the U.S. dollar, several other currencies, such as the Canadian dollar, the Japanese yen, the Chinese yuan, the Philippine peso, and several currencies in the rest of the Americas, were initially based on the Spanish dollar and other 8-real coins.

Argentine peso

pesos$AR$
The yen was legally defined as 0.78 troy ounces (24.26 g) of pure silver, or 1.5 grams of pure gold (as recommended by the European Congress of Economists in Paris in 1867; the 5-yen coin was equivalent to the Argentine 5 peso fuerte coin ),
This unit was based on that recommended by the European Congress of Economists in Paris in 1867 and adopted by Japan in 1873 (the Argentine 5 peso fuerte coin was equivalent to the Japanese 5 yen).

Japanese mon (currency)

monJapanese monJapan
The yen replaced Tokugawa coinage, a complex monetary system of the Edo period based on the mon.
The yen started to replace the old duodecimal denominations in 1870: in 3rd quarter of 1870, the first new coins appeared, namely 5, 10, 50 sen silver and 2, 5, 10, 20 Yen.

Canadian dollar

C$CAD$
Following the silver devaluation of 1873, the yen devalued against the U.S. dollar and the Canadian dollar (since those two countries adhered to a gold standard), and by the year 1897, the yen was worth only about US$0.50.
Accounting for approximately 2% of all global reserves, the Canadian dollar is the fifth most held reserve currency in the world, behind the U.S. dollar, the euro, the yen and the pound sterling.

Shinjitai

simplifiedby JapanJapanese
While the Chinese eventually replaced with, the Japanese continued to use the same word, which was given the shinjitai form 円 in reforms at the end of World War II.

Reserve currency

reserve currenciesforeign currency reservesanchor currency
It is also widely used as a reserve currency after the U.S. dollar, the euro, and the pound sterling.
Japan's yen is part of the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) special drawing rights (SDR) valuation.

Euro

EUReuros
It is also widely used as a reserve currency after the U.S. dollar, the euro, and the pound sterling. It is the third most traded currency in the foreign exchange market after the United States dollar and the euro.
After its introduction on 4 January 1999 its exchange rate against the other major currencies fell reaching its lowest exchange rates in 2000 (3 May vs Pound sterling, 25 October vs the U.S. dollar, 26 October vs Japanese yen).

Japanese asset price bubble

bubble economyJapanese economic bubbleJapanese asset bubble
The yen declined during the Japanese asset price bubble and continued to do so afterwards, reaching a low of ¥134 to US$1 in February 2002.
The endaka recession has been closely linked to the Plaza Accord of September 1985, which led to the strong appreciation of the Japanese yen.

1 yen coin

¥11 yen
The 1-yen coin is the smallest denomination of the Japanese yen currency.

5 yen coin

¥55 yen
The 5 yen coin is one denomination of Japanese yen.

Floating exchange rate

floatfloatedfloating
That exchange rate was maintained until 1971, when the United States abandoned the gold standard, which had been a key element of the Bretton Woods System, and imposed a 10 percent surcharge on imports, setting in motion changes that eventually led to floating exchange rates in 1973.
In the modern world, most of the world's currencies are floating, and include the most widely-traded currencies: the United States dollar, the Swiss franc, the Indian rupee, the euro, the Japanese yen, the pound sterling, and the Australian dollar.

United States dollar

US$$USD
The Plaza Accord of 1985 temporarily changed this situation: the exchange rate fell from its average of ¥239 per US$1 in 1985 to ¥128 in 1988 and led to a peak rate of ¥80 against the U.S. dollar in 1995, effectively increasing the value of Japan’s GDP in US dollar terms to almost that of the United States. Following the silver devaluation of 1873, the yen devalued against the U.S. dollar and the Canadian dollar (since those two countries adhered to a gold standard), and by the year 1897, the yen was worth only about US$0.50. It is the third most traded currency in the foreign exchange market after the United States dollar and the euro.

Heisei

Heisei periodHeisei eraHeisei-era
For example, a coin minted in 2009, would bear the date Heisei 21 (the 21st year of Emperor Akihito's reign).
With a dramatically strengthened yen after the 1985 Plaza Accord, the Bank of Japan kept interest rates low, sparking an investment boom that drove Tokyo property values up 60 percent within that year.

10 yen coin

¥1010 yen
The 10 yen coin is one denomination of Japanese yen.

100 yen coin

100¥100100 yen
The 100 yen coin is a denomination of Japanese yen.

50 yen coin

¥50
The 50 yen coin is a denomination of Japanese yen.

Japan

JPNJapaneseJP
The yen is the official currency of Japan. To stabilize the Japanese economy the exchange rate of the yen was fixed at ¥360 per $1 as part of the Bretton Woods system. The Plaza Accord of 1985 temporarily changed this situation: the exchange rate fell from its average of ¥239 per US$1 in 1985 to ¥128 in 1988 and led to a peak rate of ¥80 against the U.S. dollar in 1995, effectively increasing the value of Japan’s GDP in US dollar terms to almost that of the United States.