Japantown, San Francisco

JapantownSan Francisco's JapantownNihonmachiSan Francisco JapantownCherry Blossom FestivalCherry Blossom FestivalsJapan CenterJapan townJapantown / NihonmachiSan Francisco
Japantown (also known as J-Town or historically as Japanese Town, or "Nihonmachi" ("Japan town", in Japanese)) is a neighborhood in the Western Addition district of San Francisco, California.wikipedia
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Japan Center (San Francisco)

Japan CenterJapan Center Mall
Its focal point is the Japan Center, which opened in 1968, and is the site of three Japanese-oriented shopping centers.
The Japan Center is a shopping center in the Japantown neighborhood of San Francisco, California.

San Francisco Peace Pagoda

Peace PagodaThe Peace Pagoda
The San Francisco Peace Pagoda, also at the Japan Center, is a five-tiered concrete stupa designed by Japanese architect Yoshiro Taniguchi and presented to San Francisco by the people of Osaka, Japan.
The San Francisco Peace Pagoda is a five-tiered concrete stupa between Post and Geary Streets at Buchanan in San Francisco's Nihonmachi (Japantown).

San Francisco

San Francisco, CaliforniaSan Francisco, CACity and County of San Francisco
Japantown (also known as J-Town or historically as Japanese Town, or "Nihonmachi" ("Japan town", in Japanese)) is a neighborhood in the Western Addition district of San Francisco, California.
The Western Addition is usually divided into smaller neighborhoods including Hayes Valley, the Fillmore, and Japantown, which was once the largest Japantown in North America but suffered when its Japanese American residents were forcibly removed and interned during World War II. The Western Addition survived the 1906 earthquake with its Victorians largely intact, including the famous "Painted Ladies", standing alongside Alamo Square.

Western Addition, San Francisco

Western AdditionWestern Addition districtWestern Addition in San Francisco
Japantown (also known as J-Town or historically as Japanese Town, or "Nihonmachi" ("Japan town", in Japanese)) is a neighborhood in the Western Addition district of San Francisco, California.
From there, it is usually divided into smaller neighborhoods such as Lower Pacific Heights, Cathedral Hill, Japantown, the Fillmore, Hayes Valley, Alamo Square, Anza Vista, and North Panhandle.

Geary Boulevard

GearyGeary StreetGeary-street
The Japantown neighborhood is generally considered to be bordered on the north by Bush or Pine Street, and on the south by Geary Boulevard.
The boulevard borders Japantown between Fillmore and Laguna Streets.

Japanese Americans

JapaneseJapanese-AmericanJapanese American
In February 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which forced all Japanese of birth or descent, including Japanese American citizens of the United States, to be relocated from the Pacific coast and interned.
San Francisco, notably in the Japantown district, the largest Japanese community in North America.

49-Mile Scenic Drive

49-Mile Scenic Drive
After entering Japantown, the drive turns north onto Webster Street before immediately returning east along Post Street, where it continues past Japan Center, Lower Nob Hill, and Union Square.

History of the Japanese in San Francisco

first Japanese immigrants arrive in San FranciscoSan Francisco
History of the Japanese in San Francisco
During World War II, San Francisco saw the largest and oldest enclave of Japanese outside of Japan, Japantown, completely empty out many of its residents as a result of Executive Order 9066 that forced all Japanese of birth or descent in the United States to be interned.

Books Kinokuniya

KinokuniyaKinokuniya bookshopKinokuniya Bookstore
The area is home to Japanese cuisine (and some Korean and Chinese) restaurants, supermarkets, indoor shopping malls, hotels, banks and other shops, including one of the few U.S. branches of the large Kinokuniya bookstore chain.
Japantown, San Francisco, California

Japanese language

JapaneseJapanese-languageJp
Japantown (also known as J-Town or historically as Japanese Town, or "Nihonmachi" ("Japan town", in Japanese)) is a neighborhood in the Western Addition district of San Francisco, California.

California

CAState of CaliforniaCalifornia, USA
Japantown (also known as J-Town or historically as Japanese Town, or "Nihonmachi" ("Japan town", in Japanese)) is a neighborhood in the Western Addition district of San Francisco, California.

City block

blockblockssuperblock
Japantown comprises about six city blocks, and it is considered one of the largest and oldest ethnic enclaves in the United States.

Ethnic enclave

ethnic enclavesenclavesenclave
Japantown comprises about six city blocks, and it is considered one of the largest and oldest ethnic enclaves in the United States.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
Japantown comprises about six city blocks, and it is considered one of the largest and oldest ethnic enclaves in the United States.

Fillmore Street

Fillmore
The main thoroughfare is Post Street, between Fillmore Street (to the west) and Laguna Street (to the east).

Stupa

chedistupaschorten
The San Francisco Peace Pagoda, also at the Japan Center, is a five-tiered concrete stupa designed by Japanese architect Yoshiro Taniguchi and presented to San Francisco by the people of Osaka, Japan.

Japanese people

JapaneseJapanethnic Japanese
The San Francisco Peace Pagoda, also at the Japan Center, is a five-tiered concrete stupa designed by Japanese architect Yoshiro Taniguchi and presented to San Francisco by the people of Osaka, Japan.

Yoshio Taniguchi

Yoshiro TaniguchiTaniguchi
The San Francisco Peace Pagoda, also at the Japan Center, is a five-tiered concrete stupa designed by Japanese architect Yoshiro Taniguchi and presented to San Francisco by the people of Osaka, Japan.

Osaka

ŌsakaOsaka, JapanOsaka City
The San Francisco Peace Pagoda, also at the Japan Center, is a five-tiered concrete stupa designed by Japanese architect Yoshiro Taniguchi and presented to San Francisco by the people of Osaka, Japan.

1906 San Francisco earthquake

1906 earthquakeSan Francisco earthquake1906 earthquake and fire
Built and settled as part of the Western Addition neighborhood in the 19th and early 20th century, Japanese immigrants began moving into the area following the 1906 earthquake.

Chinatown, San Francisco

ChinatownSan Francisco's ChinatownSan Francisco Chinatown
(Before 1906, San Francisco had two Japantowns, one on the outskirts of Chinatown, the other in the South of Market area.

South of Market, San Francisco

South of MarketSoMaSouth of Market district
(Before 1906, San Francisco had two Japantowns, one on the outskirts of Chinatown, the other in the South of Market area.

South Park, San Francisco

South ParkSouth Park, SF
After 1906, San Francisco's main Japantown was in the Western Addition, with a smaller one in the South Park area.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
) By World War II, the neighborhood was one of the largest such enclaves of Japanese outside Japan, as it took an appearance similar to the Ginza district in Tokyo.