Jazz

jazz musicContemporary jazzModern Jazzjazz musicianjazzyjazz singerAmerican Jazzmodern creativeJazz studiesEllingtonian jazz
Jazz is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States.wikipedia
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Jazz Age

The Jazz Ageclassic jazzjazz era
Since the 1920s Jazz Age, jazz has become recognized as a major form of musical expression.
The Jazz Age was a period in the 1920s and 1930s in which jazz music and dance styles rapidly gained nationwide popularity in the United States.

Blues

blues musicthe bluespiano blues
It originated in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime. Jazz has roots in West African cultural and musical expression, and in African-American music traditions including blues and ragtime, as well as European military band music.
The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues and rock and roll, is characterized by the call-and-response pattern, the blues scale and specific chord progressions, of which the twelve-bar blues is the most common.

African-American music

African American musicblack musicrace music
Jazz has roots in West African cultural and musical expression, and in African-American music traditions including blues and ragtime, as well as European military band music.
Following the Civil War, Black Americans, through employment as musicians playing European music in military bands, developed a new style of music called ragtime which gradually evolved into jazz.

Bebop

bopbe-bopmodern jazz
Bebop emerged in the 1940s, shifting jazz from danceable popular music toward a more challenging "musician's music" which was played at faster tempos and used more chord-based improvisation.
Bebop or bop is a style of jazz developed in the early to mid-1940s in the United States, which features songs characterized by a fast tempo, complex chord progressions with rapid chord changes and numerous changes of key, instrumental virtuosity, and improvisation based on a combination of harmonic structure, the use of scales and occasional references to the melody.

Gypsy jazz

gypsy swingjazz manouchegypsy-jazz
In the 1930s, heavily arranged dance-oriented swing big bands, Kansas City jazz, a hard-swinging, bluesy, improvisational style and Gypsy jazz (a style that emphasized musette waltzes) were the prominent styles.
Gypsy jazz (also known as gypsy swing or hot club jazz) is a style of jazz generally accepted to have been started by the Romani guitarist Jean "Django" Reinhardt in Paris during the 1930s.

Blue note

blue notesblueblue seventh
Jazz is characterized by swing and blue notes, call and response vocals, polyrhythms and improvisation.
In jazz and blues, a blue note is a note that—for expressive purposes—is sung or played at a slightly different pitch than standard.

Free jazz

free-jazzfreefree form
The 1950s saw the emergence of free jazz, which explored playing without regular meter, beat and formal structures, and in the mid-1950s, hard bop emerged, which introduced influences from rhythm and blues, gospel, and blues, especially in the saxophone and piano playing.
Free jazz is an approach to jazz that developed in the 1960s when musicians attempted to change or break down jazz conventions, such as regular tempos, tones, and chord changes.

Cool jazz

coolprogressive jazzcool tone
Cool jazz developed near the end of the 1940s, introducing calmer, smoother sounds and long, linear melodic lines.
Cool jazz is a style of modern jazz music that arose in the United States after World War II.

Kansas City jazz

jazzKansas City Styleburgeoning jazz culture
In the 1930s, heavily arranged dance-oriented swing big bands, Kansas City jazz, a hard-swinging, bluesy, improvisational style and Gypsy jazz (a style that emphasized musette waltzes) were the prominent styles.
Kansas City jazz is a style of jazz that developed in Kansas City, Missouri during the 1920s and 1930s, which marked the transition from the structured big band style to the musical improvisation style of Bebop.

Hard bop

hard-bophardbopHard Bop Jazz
The 1950s saw the emergence of free jazz, which explored playing without regular meter, beat and formal structures, and in the mid-1950s, hard bop emerged, which introduced influences from rhythm and blues, gospel, and blues, especially in the saxophone and piano playing.
Hard bop is a subgenre of jazz that is an extension of bebop (or "bop") music.

Rhythm and blues

R&Brhythm & bluesRnB
The 1950s saw the emergence of free jazz, which explored playing without regular meter, beat and formal structures, and in the mid-1950s, hard bop emerged, which introduced influences from rhythm and blues, gospel, and blues, especially in the saxophone and piano playing.
The term was originally used by record companies to describe recordings marketed predominantly to urban African Americans, at a time when "urbane, rocking, jazz based music with a heavy, insistent beat" was becoming more popular.

Rock music

rockrock bandrock musician
Jazz-rock fusion appeared in the late 1960s and early 1970s, combining jazz improvisation with rock music's rhythms, electric instruments, and highly amplified stage sound.
Rock music also drew strongly from a number of other genres such as electric blues and folk, and incorporated influences from jazz, classical and other musical styles.

Latin jazz

LatinjazzLatin-style
Other styles and genres abound in the 2000s, such as Latin and Afro-Cuban jazz.
Latin jazz is a genre of jazz with Latin American rhythms.

Modal jazz

modaljazz modalitymodal period
Modal jazz developed in the late 1950s, using the mode, or musical scale, as the basis of musical structure and improvisation.
Modal jazz is jazz that makes use of musical modes often modulating between them instead of relying on one tonal center.

Duke Ellington

EllingtonDuke Ellington OrchestraThe Duke Ellington Orchestra
Duke Ellington, one of jazz's most famous figures, said, "It's all music."
Although widely considered to have been a pivotal figure in the history of jazz, Ellington embraced the phrase "beyond category" as a liberating principle and referred to his music as part of the more general category of American Music rather than to a musical genre such as jazz.

Eubie Blake

BlakeBlake, EubieJames "Eubie" Blake
In an interview with NPR, musician Eubie Blake offered his recollections of the slang connotations of the term, saying, "When Broadway picked it up, they called it 'J-A-Z-Z'. It wasn't called that. It was spelled 'J-A-S-S'. That was dirty, and if you knew what it was, you wouldn't say it in front of ladies."
James Hubert "Eubie" Blake (February 7, 1887 – February 12, 1983), was an American composer, lyricist, and pianist of ragtime, jazz, and popular music.

Swing music

swingswing jazzswing band
In the 1930s, heavily arranged dance-oriented swing big bands, Kansas City jazz, a hard-swinging, bluesy, improvisational style and Gypsy jazz (a style that emphasized musette waltzes) were the prominent styles.
Swing music, or simply swing, is a form of popular jazz music developed in the United States that dominated in the 1930s and 1940s.

Big band

big bandsbig-bandbig band music
In the 1930s, heavily arranged dance-oriented swing big bands, Kansas City jazz, a hard-swinging, bluesy, improvisational style and Gypsy jazz (a style that emphasized musette waltzes) were the prominent styles.
A big band is a type of musical ensemble of jazz music that usually consists of ten or more musicians with four sections: saxophones, trumpets, trombones, and a rhythm section.

Musical improvisation

improvisationimprovised musicimprovised
Although jazz is considered difficult to define, in part because it contains many subgenres, improvisation is one of its defining elements.
Encyclopædia Britannica defines it as "the extemporaneous composition or free performance of a musical passage, usually in a manner conforming to certain stylistic norms but unfettered by the prescriptive features of a specific musical text. Improvisation is often done within (or based on) a pre-existing harmonic framework or chord progression. Improvisation is a major part of some types of 20th-century music, such as blues, jazz, and jazz fusion, in which instrumental performers improvise solos, melody lines and accompaniment parts.

Bix Beiderbecke

Bix BiederbeckeBixBeiderbecke, Bix
The Original Dixieland Jazz Band, whose members were white, were the first jazz group to record, and Bix Beiderbecke was one of the most prominent jazz soloists of the 1920s.
Leon Bismark "Bix" Beiderbecke (March 10, 1903 – August 6, 1931) was an American jazz cornetist, pianist, and composer.

Ragtime

ragragtime musicrags
It originated in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime. Jazz has roots in West African cultural and musical expression, and in African-American music traditions including blues and ragtime, as well as European military band music.
Ragtime was an influence on early jazz; the influence of Jelly Roll Morton continued in the Harlem stride piano style of players such as James P. Johnson and Fats Waller.

Bud Freeman

Lawrence "Bud" FreemanFreeman, Bud
The Chicago Style was developed by white musicians such as Eddie Condon, Bud Freeman, Jimmy McPartland, and Dave Tough.
Lawrence "Bud" Freeman (April 13, 1906 – March 15, 1991) was an American jazz musician, bandleader, and composer, known mainly for playing the tenor saxophone, but also able at the clarinet.

Eddie Condon

Condon, EddieEddie Condon's OrchestraEddie Condon's Jazz Band
The Chicago Style was developed by white musicians such as Eddie Condon, Bud Freeman, Jimmy McPartland, and Dave Tough.
Albert Edwin Condon (November 16, 1905 – August 4, 1973) was an American jazz banjoist, guitarist, and bandleader.

Gene Krupa

Gene Krupa Orchestrabig band drum battlesGene
Others from Chicago such as Benny Goodman and Gene Krupa became leading members of swing during the 1930s.
Eugene Bertram Krupa (January 15, 1909 – October 16, 1973) was an American jazz drummer, band leader, actor, and composer known for his energetic style and showmanship.

Women in jazz

Female jazz performers and composerswomen jazz songwriterswomen performers in jazz
Female jazz performers and composers have contributed to jazz throughout its history.
Women in jazz have contributed throughout the many eras of jazz history, both as performers and as composers, songwriters and bandleaders.