Jazz

jazz musicContemporary jazzModern Jazzjazz musicianjazzyjazz singerAmerican Jazzmodern creativeJazz studiesEllingtonian jazz
Jazz is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States.wikipedia
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Paul Whiteman

Paul Whiteman and His OrchestraPaul Whiteman OrchestraPaul Whiteman & His Orchestra
In 1918, Paul Whiteman and his orchestra became a hit in San Francisco.
Paul Whiteman led a usually large ensemble and explored many styles of music, such as blending symphonic music and jazz, as in his debut of Rhapsody in Blue by George Gershwin.

Rhapsody in Blue

Rhapsody in Blue for solo piano and jazz bandRhapsody in Blue/Intro
In 1924, Whiteman commissioned George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue, which was premiered by his orchestra.
Rhapsody in Blue is a 1924 musical composition by the American composer George Gershwin for solo piano and jazz band, which combines elements of classical music with jazz-influenced effects.

Robert Palmer (writer)

Robert PalmerPalmer, RobertBob Palmer
Robert Palmer said of percussive slave music:
Soon afterwards he and fellow musicians Nancy Jeffries, Bill Barth, and Luke Faust formed a psychedelic music group, the Insect Trust, blending jazz, folk, and blues with rock and roll.

Count Basie

BasieCount Basie OrchestraWilliam "Count" Basie
Key figures in developing the "big" jazz band included bandleaders and arrangers Count Basie, Cab Calloway, Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Fletcher Henderson, Earl Hines, Harry James, Jimmie Lunceford, Glenn Miller and Artie Shaw.
William James "Count" Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer.

Jean Goldkette

Jean Goldkette Orchestra
After Whiteman's band successfully toured Europe, huge hot jazz orchestras in theater pits caught on with other whites, including Fred Waring, Jean Goldkette, and Nathaniel Shilkret.
John Jean Goldkette (March 18, 1893 – March 24, 1962) was a jazz pianist and bandleader.

Fletcher Henderson

Fletcher Henderson OrchestraFletcherFletcher Henderson and His Orchestra
Key figures in developing the "big" jazz band included bandleaders and arrangers Count Basie, Cab Calloway, Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Fletcher Henderson, Earl Hines, Harry James, Jimmie Lunceford, Glenn Miller and Artie Shaw. Whiteman's success caused blacks to follow suit, including Earl Hines (who opened in The Grand Terrace Cafe in Chicago in 1928), Duke Ellington (who opened at the Cotton Club in Harlem in 1927), Lionel Hampton, Fletcher Henderson, Claude Hopkins, and Don Redman, with Henderson and Redman developing the "talking to one another" formula for "hot" swing music.
James Fletcher Hamilton Henderson (December 18, 1897 – December 29, 1952) was an American pianist, bandleader, arranger and composer, important in the development of big band jazz and swing music.

Cab Calloway

Cab Calloway OrchestraCab Calloway and His Cotton Club OrchestraCab Calloway and His Orchestra
Key figures in developing the "big" jazz band included bandleaders and arrangers Count Basie, Cab Calloway, Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Fletcher Henderson, Earl Hines, Harry James, Jimmie Lunceford, Glenn Miller and Artie Shaw.
Cabell "Cab" Calloway III (December 25, 1907 – November 18, 1994) was an American jazz singer, dancer, and bandleader.

Claude Hopkins

Whiteman's success caused blacks to follow suit, including Earl Hines (who opened in The Grand Terrace Cafe in Chicago in 1928), Duke Ellington (who opened at the Cotton Club in Harlem in 1927), Lionel Hampton, Fletcher Henderson, Claude Hopkins, and Don Redman, with Henderson and Redman developing the "talking to one another" formula for "hot" swing music.
Claude Driskett Hopkins (August 24, 1903 – February 19, 1984) was an American jazz stride pianist and bandleader.

Don Redman

RedmanDon Redman & His OrchestraDon Redman Orchestra
Whiteman's success caused blacks to follow suit, including Earl Hines (who opened in The Grand Terrace Cafe in Chicago in 1928), Duke Ellington (who opened at the Cotton Club in Harlem in 1927), Lionel Hampton, Fletcher Henderson, Claude Hopkins, and Don Redman, with Henderson and Redman developing the "talking to one another" formula for "hot" swing music.
Donald Matthew Redman (July 29, 1900 – November 30, 1964) was an American jazz musician, arranger, bandleader, and composer.

William Manuel Johnson

Bill Johnson
Chicago was developing "Hot Jazz", and King Oliver joined Bill Johnson.
William Manuel "Bill" Johnson (August 10, 1872 – December 3, 1972), was an American jazz musician, considered the father of the "slap" style of double bass playing.

Lester Young

LesterLester "Pres" YoungLester Young–Buddy Rich Trio
In the 1930s, Kansas City Jazz as exemplified by tenor saxophonist Lester Young marked the transition from big bands to the bebop influence of the 1940s.
Lester Willis Young (August 27, 1909 – March 15, 1959), nicknamed "Pres" or "Prez", was an American jazz tenor saxophonist and occasional clarinetist.

Teddy Wilson

Teddy Wilson QuartetTeddy Wilson TrioThe Teddy Wilson Trio
In the mid-1930s, Benny Goodman hired pianist Teddy Wilson, vibraphonist Lionel Hampton and guitarist Charlie Christian to join small groups.
Theodore Shaw Wilson (November 24, 1912 – July 31, 1986) was an American jazz pianist.

Jimmie Lunceford

Jimmy LuncefordJimmie Lunceford and His OrchestraJimmie Lunceford Orchestra
Key figures in developing the "big" jazz band included bandleaders and arrangers Count Basie, Cab Calloway, Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Fletcher Henderson, Earl Hines, Harry James, Jimmie Lunceford, Glenn Miller and Artie Shaw.
James Melvin Lunceford (June 6, 1902 – July 12, 1947) was an American jazz alto saxophonist and bandleader in the swing era.

Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five

Hot FiveHis Hot FiveHot Five and Hot Sevens
After leaving Henderson's group, Armstrong formed his Hot Five band, where he popularized scat singing.
The Hot Five was Louis Armstrong's first jazz recording band led under his own name.

Cootie Williams

WilliamsC. WilliamsCharles "Cootie" Williams
He often composed for the style and skills of these individuals, such as "Jeep's Blues" for Johnny Hodges, "Concerto for Cootie" for Cootie Williams (which later became "Do Nothing Till You Hear from Me" with Bob Russell's lyrics), and "The Mooche" for Tricky Sam Nanton and Bubber Miley.
Charles Melvin "Cootie" Williams (July 10, 1911 – September 15, 1985) was an American jazz, jump blues, and rhythm and blues trumpeter.

Earl Hines

Earl "Fatha" HinesHines, EarlHines
Key figures in developing the "big" jazz band included bandleaders and arrangers Count Basie, Cab Calloway, Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Fletcher Henderson, Earl Hines, Harry James, Jimmie Lunceford, Glenn Miller and Artie Shaw. Whiteman's success caused blacks to follow suit, including Earl Hines (who opened in The Grand Terrace Cafe in Chicago in 1928), Duke Ellington (who opened at the Cotton Club in Harlem in 1927), Lionel Hampton, Fletcher Henderson, Claude Hopkins, and Don Redman, with Henderson and Redman developing the "talking to one another" formula for "hot" swing music.
Later, Hines said that he was playing piano around Pittsburgh "before the word 'jazz' was even invented".

Lonnie Johnson (musician)

Lonnie Johnson
As only a limited number of American jazz records were released in Europe, European jazz traces many of its roots to American artists such as James Reese Europe, Paul Whiteman, and Lonnie Johnson, who visited Europe during and after World War I. It was their live performances which inspired European audiences' interest in jazz, as well as the interest in all things American (and therefore exotic) which accompanied the economic and political woes of Europe during this time.
Alonzo "Lonnie" Johnson (February 8, 1899 – June 16, 1970) was an American blues and jazz singer, guitarist, violinist and songwriter.

Stan Getz

GetzGetz, StanStan Getz Quartet
Many of the big bands who were deprived of experienced musicians because of the war effort began to enlist young players who were below the age for conscription, as was the case with saxophonist Stan Getz's entry in a band as a teenager.
Stan Getz (born Stanley Gayetski; February 2, 1927 – June 6, 1991) was an American jazz saxophonist.

Thelonious Monk

MonkMonk, TheloniousThelonious Monk Quartet
Key figures in this development were largely based in New York and included pianists Thelonious Monk and Bud Powell, drummers Max Roach and Kenny Clarke, saxophonist Charlie Parker, and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie.
Thelonious Sphere Monk (, October 10, 1917 – February 17, 1982) was an American jazz pianist and composer.

Quintette du Hot Club de France

Quintet of the Hot Club of FranceHot ClubHot Club de France
This style entered full swing in France with the Quintette du Hot Club de France, which began in 1934.
The Quintette du Hot Club de France, often abbreviated "QdHCdF" or "QHCF", ("The Quintet of the Hot Club of France") was a jazz group founded in France in 1934 by guitarist Django Reinhardt and violinist Stéphane Grappelli and active in one form or another until 1948.

James "Bubber" Miley

Bubber Miley
He often composed for the style and skills of these individuals, such as "Jeep's Blues" for Johnny Hodges, "Concerto for Cootie" for Cootie Williams (which later became "Do Nothing Till You Hear from Me" with Bob Russell's lyrics), and "The Mooche" for Tricky Sam Nanton and Bubber Miley.
James Wesley "Bubber" Miley (April 3, 1903 – May 20, 1932) was an American early jazz trumpet and cornet player, specializing in the use of the plunger mute.

Bud Powell

PowellPowell, Bud[Bud] Powell
Key figures in this development were largely based in New York and included pianists Thelonious Monk and Bud Powell, drummers Max Roach and Kenny Clarke, saxophonist Charlie Parker, and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie.
Earl Rudolph "Bud" Powell (September 27, 1924 – July 31, 1966) was an American jazz pianist.

George Lewis (clarinetist)

George LewisGeorge Lewis And His New Orleans Music
This coincided with a nationwide resurgence in the Dixieland style of pre-swing jazz; performers such as clarinetist George Lewis, cornetist Bill Davison, and trombonist Turk Murphy were hailed by conservative jazz critics as more authentic than the big bands.
George Lewis (born Joseph Louis Francois Zenon, July 13, 1900 – December 31, 1968) was an American jazz clarinetist who achieved his greatest fame and influence in the later decades of his life.

Dizzy Gillespie

GillespieDizzie GillespieDizzy
Key figures in this development were largely based in New York and included pianists Thelonious Monk and Bud Powell, drummers Max Roach and Kenny Clarke, saxophonist Charlie Parker, and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie.
John Birks "Dizzy" Gillespie (October 21, 1917 – January 6, 1993) was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, composer, and singer.

Okeh Records

OkehMasterworksOKeh label
Some researchers believe Eddie Lang and Joe Venuti pioneered the guitar-violin partnership characteristic of the genre, which was brought to France after they had been heard live or on Okeh Records in the late 1920s.
Okeh is a Jazz imprint distributed by Sony Masterworks, a specialty label of Columbia.