Jean-Baptiste Lully

LullyJean Baptiste LullyJean-Baptist LullyLully, Jean-BaptisteBaptistcourt composerJ.-B. LullyJean Baptiste de LullyJean-Baptiste de LullyLulli
Jean-Baptiste Lully (, ; ; born Giovanni Battista Lulli, ; 28 November 1632– 22 March 1687) was an Italian-born French composer, instrumentalist, and dancer who spent most of his life working in the court of Louis XIV of France.wikipedia
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Baroque music

BaroqueBaroque eraBaroque period
He is considered a master of the French Baroque style.
Key composers of the Baroque era include Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonio Vivaldi, George Frideric Handel, Claudio Monteverdi, Domenico Scarlatti, Alessandro Scarlatti, Henry Purcell, Georg Philipp Telemann, Jean-Baptiste Lully, Jean-Philippe Rameau, Marc-Antoine Charpentier, Arcangelo Corelli, Tomaso Albinoni, François Couperin, Giuseppe Tartini, Heinrich Schütz, Giovanni Battista Pergolesi, Dieterich Buxtehude, and Johann Pachelbel.

Louis XIV of France

Louis XIVKing Louis XIVKing Louis XIV of France
Jean-Baptiste Lully (, ; ; born Giovanni Battista Lulli, ; 28 November 1632– 22 March 1687) was an Italian-born French composer, instrumentalist, and dancer who spent most of his life working in the court of Louis XIV of France.
The Sun King surrounded himself with a dazzling constellation of political, military, and cultural figures such as Mazarin, Colbert, Louvois, the Grand Condé, Turenne, Vauban, Boulle, Molière, Racine, Boileau, La Fontaine, Lully, Charpentier, Marais, Le Brun, Rigaud, Bossuet, Le Vau, Mansart, Charles, Claude Perrault, and Le Nôtre.

Anne Marie Louise d'Orléans, Duchess of Montpensier

La Grande MademoiselleAnne Marie Louise d'OrléansGrande Mademoiselle
In 1646, dressed as Harlequin during Mardi Gras and amusing bystanders with his clowning and his violin, the boy attracted the attention of Roger de Lorraine, chevalier de Guise, son of Charles, Duke of Guise, who was returning to France and was looking for someone to converse in Italian with his niece, Mademoiselle de Montpensier (la Grande Mademoiselle).
She is best remembered for her role in the Fronde, her role in bringing the famous composer Lully to the king's court, and her Mémoires.

Paris Opera

Paris OpéraOpéra National de ParisAcadémie Royale de Musique
Having acquired Pierre Perrin's opera privilege, Lully became the director of the Académie Royale de Musique, that is, the royal opera, which performed in the Palais-Royal.
It was founded in 1669 by Louis XIV as the Académie d'Opéra, and shortly thereafter was placed under the leadership of Jean-Baptiste Lully and officially renamed the Académie Royale de Musique, but continued to be known more simply as the Opéra.

Nicolas Métru

He probably honed his musical skills by working with Mademoiselle's household musicians and with composers Nicolas Métru, François Roberday and Nicolas Gigault.
He taught Couperin and Lully and was an outstanding viol player.

Jean-Baptiste Lully fils

Jean-Baptiste de LullyLully
All three of his sons (Louis Lully, Jean-Baptiste Lully fils, and Jean-Louis Lully) had musical careers as successive surintendants of the King's Music.
Jean-Baptiste Lully fils (Paris, 6 August 1665 – 9 March 1743) was a French musician and the second son of the composer Jean-Baptiste Lully.

Michel Lambert

LambertLAMBERT, MICHELMichel Lambert,
Thus, when he married Madeleine Lambert (1643–1720), the daughter of the renowned singer and composer Michel Lambert in 1662, Giovanni Battista Lulli declared himself to be "Jean-Baptiste Lully, escuyer squire, son of Laurent de Lully, gentilhomme Florentin [Florentine gentleman]".
Their daughter Madeleine (1643-1720) married Jean-Baptiste Lully in 1662.

Composer

music composercomposedmusic
Jean-Baptiste Lully (, ; ; born Giovanni Battista Lulli, ; 28 November 1632– 22 March 1687) was an Italian-born French composer, instrumentalist, and dancer who spent most of his life working in the court of Louis XIV of France.
Some of the best-known composers from the Baroque era include Claudio Monteverdi, Heinrich Schütz, Jean-Baptiste Lully, Dieterich Buxtehude, Arcangelo Corelli, Henry Purcell, François Couperin, Antonio Vivaldi, Georg Philipp Telemann, Jean-Philippe Rameau, Johann Sebastian Bach and George Frideric Handel.

Armide (Lully)

ArmideArmide'' (Lully)Amadis de Gaule
Some of his most popular works are his passacailles (passacaglias) and chaconnes, which are dance movements found in many of his works such as Armide or Phaëton.
Armide is an opera by Jean-Baptiste Lully.

Ballet (music)

balletballet musicballets
In the place of the slow and stately movements which had prevailed until then, he introduced lively ballets of rapid rhythm, often based on well-known dance types such as gavottes, menuets, rigaudons and sarabandes.
Ballet music composers from the 17th–19th centuries, including the likes of Jean-Baptiste Lully and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, were predominantly in France and Russia.

Phaëton (Lully)

PhaëtonPhaétonPhaëthon
Some of his most popular works are his passacailles (passacaglias) and chaconnes, which are dance movements found in many of his works such as Armide or Phaëton.
Phaëton (LWV 61) is a tragédie en musique in a prologue and five acts by Jean-Baptiste Lully.

Marc-Antoine Charpentier

CharpentierCharpentier, Marc-AntoineM.-A. Charpentier
In 1672 Lully broke with Molière, who turned to Marc-Antoine Charpentier.
It was in large part owing to Mme de Guise's protection that the Guise musicians were permitted to perform Charpentier's chamber operas in defiance of the monopoly held by Jean Baptiste Lully.

Jean-Louis Lully

Jean-Louis
All three of his sons (Louis Lully, Jean-Baptiste Lully fils, and Jean-Louis Lully) had musical careers as successive surintendants of the King's Music.
He was born in Paris, the youngest son of Jean-Baptiste Lully.

Louis Lully

Louis
All three of his sons (Louis Lully, Jean-Baptiste Lully fils, and Jean-Louis Lully) had musical careers as successive surintendants of the King's Music.
Louis Lully (4 August 1664 in Paris – 1 April 1734) was a French musician and the eldest son of Jean-Baptiste Lully.

Ercole amante

Cavalli's Ercole AmanteHercule amoureux
In 1660 and 1662 he collaborated on court performances of Francesco Cavalli's Xerse and Ercole amante.
Worse for him, eighteen ballet entrées and intermèdes with music by Isaac de Benserade and Jean-Baptiste Lully were inserted, mostly at the ends of Cavalli's acts, to cater to French taste.

Théâtre du Palais-Royal (rue Saint-Honoré)

Théâtre du Palais-RoyalSalle du Palais-RoyalPalais-Royal
Having acquired Pierre Perrin's opera privilege, Lully became the director of the Académie Royale de Musique, that is, the royal opera, which performed in the Palais-Royal.
On the death of his old collaborator, Lully ejected Molière's troupe to a new home at the Hôtel de Guénégaud and re-used the theatre as the opera house of the Académie royale de Musique (the name of the Paris Opera at the time).

François Roberday

He probably honed his musical skills by working with Mademoiselle's household musicians and with composers Nicolas Métru, François Roberday and Nicolas Gigault.
He was also known as a teacher and Jean-Baptiste Lully may have been one of his pupils.

Gavotte

GavottaGavotagavots
In the place of the slow and stately movements which had prevailed until then, he introduced lively ballets of rapid rhythm, often based on well-known dance types such as gavottes, menuets, rigaudons and sarabandes.
Many were composed by Lully, Rameau and Gluck, and the 17th-century cibell is a variety.

Molière

MoliereJean-Baptiste PoquelinJean-Baptiste Poquelin Molière
Lully's collaboration with the playwright Molière began with in 1661, when Lully provided a single sung courante, added after the work's premiere at Nicolas Fouquet's sumptuous chateau of Vaux-le-Vicomte. Through his collaboration with playwright Molière, a new music form emerged during the 1660s: the comédie-ballet which combined theater, comedy, incidental music and ballet.
Molière's friendship with Jean-Baptiste Lully influenced him towards writing his Le Mariage forcé and La Princesse d'Élide (subtitled as Comédie galante mêlée de musique et d'entrées de ballet), written for royal "divertissements" at the Palace of Versailles.

Chaconne

ciacconaCiaconnaChaconni
Some of his most popular works are his passacailles (passacaglias) and chaconnes, which are dance movements found in many of his works such as Armide or Phaëton.

Recorder (musical instrument)

recorderrecordersalto recorder
He also utilized guitar, lute, archlute, theorbo, harpsichord, organ, oboe, bassoon, recorder, flute, brass instruments (natural trumpet) and various percussion instruments (castanets, timpani).
Composers who have written for the recorder include Monteverdi, Lully, Purcell, Handel, Vivaldi, Telemann, Johann Sebastian Bach, Paul Hindemith, Benjamin Britten, Leonard Bernstein, Luciano Berio, and Arvo Pärt.

Haute-contre

hautes-contrehigh tenor
The instruments in Lully's music were: five voices of strings such as dessus (a higher range than soprano), haute-contre (the instrumental equivalent of the high tenor voice by that name), taille (baritenor), quinte, basse), divided as follows: one voice of violins, three voices of violas, one voice of cello, and basse de viole (viole, viola da gamba).
Lully wrote 8 out of 14 leading male roles for the voice; Charpentier, who was an haute-contre himself, composed extensively for the voice-part, as did Rameau and, later, Gluck.

Tragédie en musique

tragédie lyriquetragédies en musiquetragédies lyriques
Lully created French-style opera as a musical genre (tragédie en musique or tragédie lyrique).
Tragédie en musique (, musical tragedy), also known as tragédie lyrique (, lyric tragedy), is a genre of French opera introduced by Jean-Baptiste Lully and used by his followers until the second half of the eighteenth century.

Xerse

Il XerseoneSerse
In 1660 and 1662 he collaborated on court performances of Francesco Cavalli's Xerse and Ercole amante.
Xerse was given with ballets by Cavalli's rival Jean-Baptiste Lully, a Florentine who had become the official court composer in France.

Comédie-ballet

comédies-balletscomédie ballettragicomédie et ballet
Through his collaboration with playwright Molière, a new music form emerged during the 1660s: the comédie-ballet which combined theater, comedy, incidental music and ballet.
The music and choreography were by Pierre Beauchamp, but Jean-Baptiste Lully later contributed a sung courante for Act I, scene 3.