A report on Jesus

Counter-clockwise from top-right: Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, Latin, and English transcriptions of the name Jesus
A 3rd-century Greek papyrus of the Gospel of Luke
Adoration of the Shepherds by Gerard van Honthorst, 1622
The Circumcision by Giovanni Bellini, ~1500. The work depicts the circumcision of Jesus.
The Finding of the Saviour in the Temple, by William Holman Hunt, 1860
The Baptism of Christ by John the Baptist, by José Ferraz de Almeida Júnior, 1895
Sermon on the Mount, by Carl Bloch, 1877, depicts Jesus' important discourse
The Exhortation to the Apostles, by James Tissot, portrays Jesus talking to his 12 disciples
Jesus and the rich young man by Heinrich Hofmann, 1889
The Return of the Prodigal Son by Pompeo Batoni depicts the Parable of the Prodigal Son. Jesus told many parables during his ministry.
Jesus cleansing a leper, medieval mosaic from the Monreale Cathedral, late 12th to mid-13th centuries
The Transfiguration of Jesus, depicted by Carl Bloch, 19th century
A painting of Jesus' final entry into Jerusalem, by Jean-Léon Gérôme, 1897
The Last Supper, depicted by Juan de Juanes, c. 1562
A depiction of the kiss of Judas and arrest of Jesus, by Caravaggio, c. 1602
Ecce homo! Antonio Ciseri's 1871 depiction of Pontius Pilate presenting Jesus to the public
Pietro Perugino's depiction of the Crucifixion as Stabat Mater, 1482
Appearance of Jesus Christ to Maria Magdalena by Alexander Andreyevich Ivanov, 1835
A 3rd century depiction of Jesus as the Good Shepherd
Judea, Galilee and neighboring areas at the time of Jesus
A 1640 edition of the works of Josephus, a 1st-century Roman-Jewish historian who referred to Jesus.
Baptism in the Jordan River, the river where Jesus was baptized
The Resurrection of Christ from a 16th-century manuscript of La Passion de Nostre Seigneur
The ethnicity of Jesus in art has been influenced by cultural settings.
The Trinity is the belief in Christianity that God is one God in three persons: God the Father, God the Son (Jesus), and God the Holy Spirit.
Jesus is depicted with the Alpha and Omega letters in the catacombs of Rome from the 4th century.
The name Jesus son of Mary written in Islamic calligraphy followed by Peace be upon him
The Druze maqam of Al-masih (Jesus) in As-Suwayda Governorate.
Enthroned Jesus image on a Manichaean temple banner from c. 10th-century Qocho
Jesus healing a paralytic in one of the first known images of Jesus from Dura Europos in the 3rd century
The Shroud of Turin, Italy, is the best-known claimed relic of Jesus and one of the most studied artifacts in human history.
Jesus depicted as the liberator of Black slaves, on the masthead of the Abolitionist paper "The Liberator".

Jesus (c.

- Jesus

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An Eastern Christian icon depicting Emperor Constantine and the Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea (325) as holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.

Christianity

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An Eastern Christian icon depicting Emperor Constantine and the Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea (325) as holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.
Various depictions of Jesus
Crucifixion, representing the death of Jesus on the Cross, painting by Diego Velázquez, c. 1632.
The Law and the Gospel by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1529); Moses and Elijah point the sinner to Jesus for salvation.
The Trinity is the belief that God is one God in three persons: the Father, the Son (Jesus), and the Holy Spirit.
Midnight Mass at a Catholic parish church in Woodside, New York City, U.S.
Show on the life of Jesus at Igreja da Cidade in São José dos Campos, affiliated to the Brazilian Baptist Convention.
An early circular ichthys symbol, created by combining the Greek letters ΙΧΘΥΣ into a wheel, Ephesus, Asia Minor.
The Bible is the sacred book in Christianity.
St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City, the largest church in the world and a symbol of the Catholic Church.
The 7th-century Khor Virap monastery in the shadow of Mount Ararat; Armenia was the first state to adopt Christianity as the state religion, in AD 301.
The Monastery of St. Matthew, located atop Mount Alfaf in northern Iraq, is recognized as one of the oldest Christian monasteries in existence.
Kadisha Valley, Lebanon, home to some of the earliest Christian monasteries in the world.
Christendom by A.D. 600 after its spread to Africa and Europe from the Middle East.
An example of Byzantine pictorial art, the Deësis mosaic at the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople.
Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont, where he preached the First Crusade. Illustration by Jean Colombe from a copy of the Passages d'outremer, c. 1490.
Martin Luther initiated the Reformation with his Ninety-five Theses in 1517.
Michelangelo's 1498–99 Pietà in St. Peter's Basilica; the Catholic Church was among the patronages of the Renaissance.
A depiction of Madonna and Child in a 19th-century Kakure Kirishitan Japanese woodcut.
A Christian procession in Brazil, the country with the largest Catholic population in the world.
Trinity Sunday in Russia; the Russian Orthodox Church has experienced a great revival since the fall of communism.
The global distribution of Christians: Countries colored a darker shade have a higher proportion of Christians.
Pope Francis, the current leader of the Catholic Church.
St. George's Cathedral in Istanbul: It has been the seat of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople whose leader is regarded as the primus inter pares in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
Holy Trinity Cathedral in Addis Ababa, the seat of the Ethiopian Orthodox.
A 6th-century Nestorian church, St. John the Arab, in the Assyrian village of Geramon in Hakkari, southeastern Turkey.
Saint Mary Church; an ancient Assyrian church located in the city of Urmia, Iran.
A 19th-century drawing of Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery receiving the Aaronic priesthood from John the Baptist. Latter Day Saints believe that the Priesthood ceased to exist after the death of the apostles and therefore needed to be restored.
Unitarian Church of Transylvania in Cluj-Napoca.
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A copy of the Summa Theologica by Thomas Aquinas, a famous Christian apologetic work.
Christians fleeing their homes in the Ottoman Empire, circa 1922. Many Christians were persecuted and/or killed during the Armenian genocide, Greek genocide, and Assyrian genocide.
Countries with 50% or more Christians are colored purple; countries with 10% to 50% Christians are colored pink
Nations with Christianity as their state religion are in blue
Distribution of Catholics
Distribution of Protestants
Distribution of Eastern Orthodox
Distribution of Oriental Orthodox
Distribution of other Christians
Links between interdenominational movements and other developments within Protestantism
Historical chart of the main Protestant branches
The Cenacle on Mount Zion in Jerusalem, claimed to be the location of the Last Supper and Pentecost.
A folio from Papyrus 46, an early-3rd-century collection of Pauline epistles

Christianity is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.

Evangelist Mathäus und der Engel, by Rembrandt, 1661

New Testament

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Second division of the Christian biblical canon.

Second division of the Christian biblical canon.

Evangelist Mathäus und der Engel, by Rembrandt, 1661
Saint Paul Writing His Epistles by Valentin de Boulogne (c. 1618–1620). Most scholars think Paul actually dictated his letters to a secretary.
Papyrus Bodmer VIII, at the Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, showing 1 and 2 Peter.
The Codex Regius (L or 019), an 8th-century Greek manuscript of the New Testament with strong affinities to Codex Vaticanus.
The Rossano Gospels, 6th century, a representative of Byzantine text
The Rabbula Gospels, Eusebian Canons.
BL Add. MS 59874 with Ethiopic Gospel of Matthew.
A Byzantine lectionary, Codex Harleianus (l150), 995 AD, text of John 1:18.
Gaudenzio Ferrari's Stories of the Life and Passion of Christ, fresco, 1513, Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie, Varallo Sesia, Italy. Depicting the life of Jesus

The choice of this word diatheke, by the Jewish translators of the Septuagint in Alexandria in the 3rd and 2nd century BCE, has been understood in Christian theology to imply a reinterpreted view of the Old Testament covenant with Israel as possessing characteristics of a 'will left after death' (the death of Jesus) and has generated considerable attention from biblical scholars and theologians: in contrast to the Jewish usage where brit was the usual Hebrew word used to refer to pacts, alliances and covenants in general, like a common pact between two individuals, and to the one between God and Israel in particular, in the Greek world diatheke was virtually never used to refer to an alliance or covenant (one exception is noted in a passage from Aristophanes) and referred instead to a will left after the death of a person.

The Virgin in Prayer, by Sassoferrato, c. 1650

Mary, mother of Jesus

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The Virgin in Prayer, by Sassoferrato, c. 1650
Maria Advocata (Hagiosoritissa) in Santa Maria in Via Lata (Rome), with the invocations "Source of Light", "Star of the Sea"
Maria Advocata (Hagiosoritissa) in Santa Maria in Via Lata (Rome), with the invocations "Source of Light", "Star of the Sea"
Virgin and Child with angels and Sts. George and Theodore. Icon, c. 600, from Saint Catherine's Monastery
Our Lady of Sorrows, by Giovanni Battista Salvi da Sassoferrato, 17th century
Madonna on Floral Wreath by Peter Paul Rubens with Jan Brueghel the Elder, c. 1619
The Annunciation by Eustache Le Sueur, an example of 17th century Marian art. The Angel Gabriel announces to Mary her pregnancy with Jesus and offers her White Lilies.
The Virgin's first seven steps, mosaic from Chora Church, c. 12th century
A nativity scene in France. Santons featuring the Virgin Mary.
Stabat Mater by Gabriel Wuger, 1868
The Dormition: ivory plaque, late 10th–early 11th century (Musée de Cluny)
The chapel based on the claimed House of Mary in Ephesus
A mosaic from the Hagia Sophia of Constantinople (modern Istanbul), depicting Mary with Jesus, flanked by John II Komnenos (left) and his wife Irene of Hungary (right), c. 1118 AD
15th century icon of the Theotokos ("God-bearer")
Stained glass window of Jesus leaving his mother, in a Lutheran church in South Carolina
Persian miniature of Mary and Jesus
Mary shaking the palm tree for dates
Madonna of humility by Fra Angelico, c. 1430. A traditional depiction of Mary wearing blue clothes.
Village decorations during the Feast of the Assumption in Għaxaq, Malta
Mary with an inscription referencing Luke 1:46–47 in St. Jürgen (Lutheran) church in Gettorf (Schleswig-Holstein)
Miraculous Icon of Our Lady of Tartaków in Blessed Virgin Mary Church in Łukawiec.
Mary nursing the Infant Jesus. Early image from the Catacomb of Priscilla, Rome, {{circa|2nd century}}
Trojeručica, a Byzantine representation of the Theotokos, ({{circa|8th century}}), in Hilandar. Serbia
Our Lady of Vladimir, a Byzantine representation of the Theotokos
{{transl|el|Theotokos Panachranta}}, from the 11th century Gertrude Psalter
Flight into Egypt by Giotto {{circa|1304}}
Lamentation by Pietro Lorenzetti, Assisi Basilica, {{circa|1310–1329}}
Black Madonna and Child, Church of Our Lady Mary of Zion, Axum, Ethiopia
Chinese Madonna, St. Francis' Church, Macao
Michelangelo's Pietà (1498–99) in St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City
Visitation, from the St Vaast Altarpiece by Jacques Daret, 1434–1435
Virgin of Guadalupe, from the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe, Mexico City, 16th century
Our Lady of La Naval de Manila statue in Quezon City, Philippines, {{circa|1593}}
Adoration of the Magi, Rubens, 1634
Virgin of Montserrat from Puerto Rico, {{circa|1775-1825}}
Virgin and Child, French (15th century)
thumb|Mary outside St. Nikolai Catholic Church in Ystad 2021
A kneeling Virgin Mary pictured in the former coat of arms of Maaria
Inside of the Tomb of Mary, on the foothills of Mount of Olives, Jerusalem

Mary was a first-century Jewish woman of Nazareth, the wife of Joseph, and the mother of Jesus.

The 17th-century painting Christ Crucified by Diego Velázquez, held by the Museo del Prado in Madrid

Crucifixion of Jesus

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The crucifixion of Jesus occurred in 1st-century Judea, most likely in either AD 30 or AD 33.

The crucifixion of Jesus occurred in 1st-century Judea, most likely in either AD 30 or AD 33.

The 17th-century painting Christ Crucified by Diego Velázquez, held by the Museo del Prado in Madrid
A depiction of the Raising of the Cross, by Sebastiano Mazzoni, 17th century, Ca' Rezzonico
Bronzino's depiction of the crucifixion with three nails, no ropes, and a hypopodium standing support, c. 1545.
Christ on the Cross between two thieves. Illumination from the Vaux Passional, 16th century
Crucifixion, from the Buhl Altarpiece, a particularly large Gothic oil on panel painting from the 1490s.
Crucifixion of Jesus of Nazareth, medieval illustration from the Hortus deliciarum of Herrad of Landsberg, 12th century
Andrea di Bartolo, Way to Calvary, c. 1400. The cluster of halos at the left are the Virgin Mary in front, with the Three Marys.
A diagram of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and the historical site
The dead Christ with the Virgin, John the Evangelist and Mary Magdalene. Unknown painter of the 18th century
Crucifixion of Jesus on a two-beamed cross, from the Sainte Bible (1866)
Torture stake, a simple wooden torture stake. Image by Justus Lipsius.
Crucifixion, seen from the Cross, by James Tissot, c. 1890, Brooklyn Museum
Christ on the Cross, by Carl Heinrich Bloch, showing the skies darkened
Bronzino's Deposition of Christ
Adoration of the Mystic Lamb (detail of the Ghent Altarpiece, Jan van Eyck, c. 1432). Christ is represented as the sacrificial Lamb of God.
Detail of the countenance of Christ just dead, by José Luján Pérez, 1793, Las Palmas Cathedral
Betrayal of Christ, stained glass, Gotland, Sweden, 1240
Mateo Cerezo, Ecce Homo, 1650
Carrying the Cross fresco, Decani monastery, Serbia, 14th century
Orthodox Crucifixion icon, Athens, Greece
Crucifixion of Christ, Michelangelo, 1540
Print of the Crucifixion, made at the end of the 16th century<ref>{{Cite web|title=De Kruisiging|url=https://lib.ugent.be/viewer/archive.ugent.be:B4D16A3C-15CD-11E9-954B-23312282636C#?c=&m=&s=&cv=&xywh=-2876,-181,8131,3613|access-date=2020-09-28|website=lib.ugent.be}}</ref>
Calvary by Paolo Veronese, 16th century
From a 14th–15th century Welsh Manuscript
Pietro Lorenzetti fresco, Assisi Basilica, 1310–1329
Descent from the Cross, Rubens (1616–17)
Descent from the Cross, Raphael, 1507

There is no reference to a woman named Veronica in the Gospels, but sources such as Acta Sanctorum describe her as a pious woman of Jerusalem who, moved with pity as Jesus carried his cross to Golgotha, gave him her veil that he might wipe his forehead.

The Rylands Papyrus is the oldest known New Testament fragment, dated to about 125.

Gospel of John

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Fourth of the four canonical gospels.

Fourth of the four canonical gospels.

The Rylands Papyrus is the oldest known New Testament fragment, dated to about 125.
Jesus giving the Farewell Discourse to his 11 remaining disciples, from the Maestà of Duccio, 1308–1311
A Syriac Christian rendition of St. John the Evangelist, from the Rabbula Gospels
Bede translating the Gospel of John on his deathbed, by James Doyle Penrose, 1902

It contains a highly schematic account of the ministry of Jesus, with seven "signs" culminating in the raising of Lazarus (foreshadowing the resurrection of Jesus) and seven "I am" discourses (concerned with issues of the church–synagogue debate at the time of composition) culminating in Thomas' proclamation of the risen Jesus as "my Lord and my God".

Saint John the Baptist, by Titian

John the Baptist

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John the Baptist (c.

John the Baptist (c.

Saint John the Baptist, by Titian
The Preaching of St. John the Baptist by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, 1566
Salome is given the severed head of John the Baptist, Onorio Marinari, 1670s
St. John the Baptist Preaching, c. 1665, by Mattia Preti
The Baptism of Jesus Christ, by Piero della Francesca,
Matthias Grünewald, detail of the Isenheim Altarpiece
Nabi Yahya Mosque, the traditional burial site of John the Baptist, in Sebastia, near Nablus
Monastery of Saint John in the Wilderness
Shrine of John the Baptist in the Umayyad Mosque, which purportedly houses John the Baptist's head
A Kolkata Armenian kisses the hand of St John the Baptist at Chinsurah.
Saint Karapet Monastery, where Armenian tradition holds that his remains were laid to rest by Gregory the Illuminator
Tomb of Saint John the Baptist at a Coptic monastery in Lower Egypt. The bones of Saint John the Baptist were said to have been found here.
Birth of John the Baptist, Cappella Tornabuoni
Serbo-Byzantine fresco from Gračanica Monastery, Kosovo,
The Druze Maqam al-Nabi Yahya (John the Baptist) in As-Suwayda Governorate.
John setting off into the desert, Giovanni di Paolo, 1454
Eastern Orthodox icon John the Baptist – the Angel of the Desert (Stroganov School, 1620s) Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow
John the Baptist (right) with child Jesus, in the painting The Holy Children with a Shell by Bartolomé Esteban Perez Murillo
Head of St. John the Baptist on a Plate, Southern Netherlands,, oak
St John (right) in Christ in the House of His Parents by John Everett Millais, 1849–50
Catholic church at his traditional birthplace in Ein Kerem
Wooden statue. Pietro Paolo Azzopardi, 1845, Xewkija.
St. John the Baptist ({{c.|1513–1516}}), Leonardo da Vinci
John the Baptist in the desert (1577–1621), Cristofano Allori
John the Baptist (17th century), Michele Fabris
The Beheading of St John the Baptist, {{c.|1869}}, Puvis de Chavannes

According to the New Testament, John anticipated a messianic figure greater than himself, and the Gospels portray John as the precursor or forerunner of Jesus.

The Apostle Paul,, Rembrandt

Paul the Apostle

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The Apostle Paul,, Rembrandt
The Conversion of Saul, fresco by Michelangelo, 1542–1545
Geography relevant to Paul's life, stretching from Jerusalem to Rome
Conversion on the Way to Damascus (1601), by Caravaggio
The Conversion of Saint Paul on the Way to Damascus (c. 1889), by José Ferraz de Almeida Júnior
Caravaggio (1571–1610), The Conversion of Saint Paul, 1600
St Paul by Peter Paul Rubens
The Apostle Paul,, Rembrandt
The house believed to be of Ananias of Damascus in Damascus
Bab Kisan, believed to be where Paul escaped from persecution in Damascus
Map of the missionary journeys of St. Paul
Saint Paul delivering the Areopagus sermon in Athens, by Raphael, 1515. This sermon addressed early issues in Christology.
The Preaching of Saint Paul at Ephesus by Eustache Le Sueur (1649)
Saint Paul arrested, early 1900s Bible illustration
St. Paul's Grotto in Rabat, Malta
Paul Arrives in Rome, from Die Bibel in Bildern
The Beheading of Saint Paul by Enrique Simonet, 1887
Greek Orthodox mural painting of Saint Paul
Statue of St. Paul in the Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran by Pierre-Étienne Monnot
Paul Writing His Epistles, painting attributed to Valentin de Boulogne, 17th century
Russian Orthodox icon of the Apostle Paul, 18th century (Iconostasis of Transfiguration Church, Kizhi Monastery, Karelia, Russia)
Saint Paul, Byzantine ivory relief, 6th – early 7th century (Musée de Cluny)
Paul the Apostle, (16th-century) attributed to Lucas van Leyden
Statue of St. Paul (1606) by Gregorio Fernández
A statue of Paul holding a scroll (symbolising the Scriptures) and the sword (symbolising his martyrdom)
Facial composite of Saint Paul, created by experts of the Landeskriminalamt of North Rhine-Westphalia using historical sources

Paul (previously called Saul of Tarsus; c. 5 AD), commonly known as Paul the Apostle and Saint Paul, was a Christian apostle who spread the teachings of Jesus in the first-century world.

Funerary stele of Licinia Amias on marble, in the National Roman Museum. One of the earliest Christian inscriptions found, it comes from the early 3rd century Vatican necropolis area in Rome. It contains the text ΙΧΘΥϹ ΖΩΝΤΩΝ ("fish of the living"), a predecessor of the Ichthys symbol.

History of Christianity

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The history of Christianity concerns the Christian religion, Christian countries, and the Christians with their various denominations, from the 1st century to the present.

The history of Christianity concerns the Christian religion, Christian countries, and the Christians with their various denominations, from the 1st century to the present.

Funerary stele of Licinia Amias on marble, in the National Roman Museum. One of the earliest Christian inscriptions found, it comes from the early 3rd century Vatican necropolis area in Rome. It contains the text ΙΧΘΥϹ ΖΩΝΤΩΝ ("fish of the living"), a predecessor of the Ichthys symbol.
The eastern Mediterranean region in the time of Paul the Apostle
Christ Jesus, the Good Shepherd, 3rd century
St. Lawrence (martyred 258) before Emperor Valerianus by Fra Angelico
A folio from Papyrus 46, an early-3rd-century collection of Pauline epistles
Virgin and Child. Wall painting from the early Roman catacombs, 4th century.
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Icon depicting the Emperor Constantine (centre) and the bishops of the First Council of Nicaea (325) holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.
Imagined portrait of Arius; detail of a Cretan School icon, c. 1591, depicting the First Council of Nicaea.
The ceiling mosaic of the Arian Baptistery, built in Ravenna by the Ostrogothic King Theodoric the Great.
An Eastern Roman mosaic showing a basilica with towers, mounted with Christian crosses, 5th century, Louvre
The Church of the East during the Middle Ages
Coptic icon of St. Anthony the Great, father of Christian monasticism and early anchorite. The Coptic inscription reads ‘Ⲡⲓⲛⲓϣϯ Ⲁⲃⲃⲁ Ⲁⲛⲧⲱⲛⲓ’ ("the Great Father Anthony").
A mosaic of Justinian I in the Basilica of San Vitale, Ravenna, Italy
Roderick is venerated as one of the Martyrs of Córdoba
Raid on the Monastery of Zobe and the death of hegumenos Michael and his 36 brothers, depicted in the Menologion of Basil II.
"Hospitality of Abraham", icon by Andrei Rublev; the three angels represent the Godhead according to Trinitarian Christians.
Western Europe, the Holy Roman Empire, Kievan Rus', and the Byzantine Empire in the Middle Ages (year 1000)
The spread of Cistercians from their original sites in Western-Central Europe during the Middle Ages
Henry IV, the Holy Roman Emperor at the gate of Canossa Castle in 1077, during the Investiture controversy.
The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Crusader states with their strongholds in the Holy Land at their height, between the First and the Second Crusade (1135)
St. Cyril and St. Methodius monument on Mt. Radhošť
Christianization of Kievan Rus', the first unified federation of Slavic tribes
Christianization of Moravia under the rule of Rastislav
Jan Hus defending his theses at the Council of Constance (1415), painting by the Czech artist Václav Brožík
Michelangelo's Pietà (1498–99) in St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City
American Discovery Viewed by Native Americans (Thomas Hart Benton, 1922). European discovery and colonization had disastrous effects on the Indigenous peoples of the Americas and their societies.
The Council in Santa Maria Maggiore church; Museo Diocesiano Tridentino, Trento
Galileo before the Holy Office, a 19th-century painting by Joseph-Nicolas Robert-Fleury
Philipp Spener, the founder of Pietism
Churches of the Moscow Kremlin, as seen from the Balchug
Demolition of the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow on the orders of Joseph Stalin, 5 December 1931, consistent with the doctrine of state atheism in the USSR
Pope Pius XI
Laying on of hands during a service in a neo-charismatic church in Ghana

Christianity originated with the ministry of Jesus, a Jewish teacher and healer who proclaimed the imminent Kingdom of God and was crucified c. AD 30–33 in Jerusalem in the Roman province of Judea.

Matthew 21:34–37 on Papyrus 104 (recto; c. AD 150).

Gospel of Matthew

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First book of the New Testament of the Bible and one of the three synoptic Gospels.

First book of the New Testament of the Bible and one of the three synoptic Gospels.

Matthew 21:34–37 on Papyrus 104 (recto; c. AD 150).
Papyrus, fragment of a flyleaf with the title of the Gospel of Matthew, ευαγγελιον κ̣ατ̣α μαθ᾽θαιον (euangelion kata Maththaion). Dated to late 2nd or early 3rd century, it is the earliest manuscript title for Matthew

It tells how Israel's Messiah, Jesus, comes to his people and forms a community of disciples, of how he taught the people through such events as the Sermon on the Mount and its Beatitudes, and how Israel becomes divided and how Jesus condemns this hostile Israel.

Samuel anoints David, Dura Europos, Syria, Date: 3rd century CE.

Messiah

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In Abrahamic religions, a messiah or messias (מָשִׁיחַ; μεσσίας,

In Abrahamic religions, a messiah or messias (מָשִׁיחַ; μεσσίας,

Samuel anoints David, Dura Europos, Syria, Date: 3rd century CE.
Chabad Halachic ruling declaring "every single Jew" had to believe in the imminent second coming of the deceased 7th Lubavitcher Rebbe as the Messiah
The Last Judgment, by Jean Cousin the Younger (c. late 16th century)
Timeline of Jesus in Islamic Eschatology
Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, founder of the Ahmadiyya Movement in Islam, considered by Ahmadis to be the Promised Messiah of the latter days

Christians commonly refer to Jesus of Nazareth as either the "Christ" or the "Messiah", believing that the messianic prophecies were fulfilled in the mission, death, and resurrection of Jesus and that he will return to fulfill the rest of messianic prophecies.