Jesus in Islam

JesusIsaIslamic view of JesusʿĪsāIsa (Jesus)ĪsāJesus ChristʻĪsā‘Īsā respected Jesus as a Prophet
In Islam, Isa refers to Jesus.wikipedia
396 Related Articles

Islam

IslamicMuslimMuslims
In Islam, ʿĪsā ibn Maryam, or Jesus, is understood to be the penultimate prophet and messenger of God (Allah) and (Christ), sent to guide the Children of Israel with a new revelation: Injīl (Arabic for "the gospel").
Muslims believe that Islam is the complete and universal version of a primordial faith that was revealed many times before through prophets including Adam, Abraham, Moses and Jesus, and the Quran in its Arabic to be the unaltered and final revelation of God.

Mary in Islam

MaryMaryamIslamic view of Virgin Mary
The significance of Jesus in Islam is reflected in his being mentioned in the Quran in 93 verses with various titles attached such as "Son of Mary" and other relational terms, mentioned directly and indirectly, over 187 times.
Mary, the mother of Jesus (Isa), holds a singularly exalted place in Islam as the only woman named in the Quran, which refers to her seventy times and explicitly identifies her as the greatest of all women, stating, with reference to the angelic saluation during the annunciation, "O Mary, God has chosen you, and purified you; He has chosen you above all the women of creation."

Gospel in Islam

InjilGospelInjīl
In Islam, ʿĪsā ibn Maryam, or Jesus, is understood to be the penultimate prophet and messenger of God (Allah) and (Christ), sent to guide the Children of Israel with a new revelation: Injīl (Arabic for "the gospel").
Injil (إنجيل, alternative spellings: Ingil or Injeel) is the Arabic name for the Gospel of Jesus (Isa).

Islamic views on Jesus' death

Islamic view of Jesus' deathcrucifiedin Islam the belief is
According to mainstream Islamic interpretations of the Quran, he was neither crucified nor raised from the dead, but rather was saved by God.
The issue of the crucifixion, death and resurrection of Jesus (Isa) is rejected by most Muslims, but similar to Christians they believe that Jesus ascended to heaven and will, according to Hadith, return before the end of time.

Ahmad

AhmedAhmetAḥmad
In Islam, Jesus is believed to have been the precursor to the Islamic prophet Muhammad, attributing the name Ahmad to someone who would follow him.
As an Arabic name, it has its origins in a Quranic prophecy attributed to Jesus in the Quran, about Muhammad.

Muhammad

Prophet MuhammadMohammedMohammad
In Islam, Jesus is believed to have been the precursor to the Islamic prophet Muhammad, attributing the name Ahmad to someone who would follow him.
According to Islamic doctrine, he was a prophet, sent to present and confirm the monotheistic teachings preached previously by Adam, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and other prophets.

Prophets and messengers in Islam

Islamic prophetprophetprophets
In Islam, ʿĪsā ibn Maryam, or Jesus, is understood to be the penultimate prophet and messenger of God (Allah) and (Christ), sent to guide the Children of Israel with a new revelation: Injīl (Arabic for "the gospel").
For example, the Jewish Elisha is called Eliyas, Job is Ayyub, Jesus is Isa, etc. The Torah given to Moses (Musa) is called Tawrat, the Psalms given to David (Dawud) is the Zabur, the Gospel given to Jesus is Injil.

Miracles of Jesus

miraclesmiraclemiracles of Jesus in the Gospels
He is believed to have performed many miracles, several being mentioned in the Quran.
For many Christians and Muslims, the miracles are actual historical events.

Messiah

messianicmessianic figurePromised Messiah
As in the Christian New Testament, the Quran (the central religious text of Islam) describes Jesus as the Messiah (al-Masih in Arabic), born of a virgin, performing miracles, accompanied by disciples, rejected by the Jewish establishment, and being raised to heaven.
In Islam, Jesus was a prophet and the Masîḥ, the Messiah sent to the Israelites, and he will return to Earth at the end of times, along with the Mahdi, and defeat al-Masih ad-Dajjal, the false Messiah.

Ascension of Jesus

AscensionAscension DayAscension of Christ
(Although the earliest Muslim traditions and exegesis quote somewhat conflicting reports regarding a death and its length, most Muslims believe that Jesus only appeared to be crucified and was instead raised alive to heaven.)
In Islam, Jesus was neither crucified nor raised from the dead, and according to the Qur’an, he was rather saved by God and raised to heaven.

List of characters and names mentioned in the Quran

Plants in Islamdirect mentioningRelate animals in the Quran
He is thus the most mentioned person in the Quran by reference; 25 times by the name Isa, third-person 48 times, first-person 35 times, and the rest as titles and attributes.

Islamic eschatology

Day of ResurrectionDay of Judgmenteschatology
In Islamic eschatology, Jesus returns in a Second Coming to fight the Al-Masih ad-Dajjal or "False Messiah" and establish peace on earth.
During this period, terrible corruption and chaos would rule the earth, caused by the Masih ad-Dajjal (the Antichrist in Islam), then Isa (Jesus) will appear, defeating the Dajjal and establish a period of peace, liberating the world from cruelty.

God in Islam

GodAllahSubhanahu wa ta'ala
In Islam, ʿĪsā ibn Maryam, or Jesus, is understood to be the penultimate prophet and messenger of God (Allah) and (Christ), sent to guide the Children of Israel with a new revelation: Injīl (Arabic for "the gospel").
Muslims reject the Christian doctrine of the Trinity and divinity of Jesus, comparing it to polytheism.

Al-Masih ad-Dajjal

DajjalMasih ad-DajjalAd-Dajjal
In Islamic eschatology, Jesus returns in a Second Coming to fight the Al-Masih ad-Dajjal or "False Messiah" and establish peace on earth.
Some Sunni Muslims believe that Jesus (or 'Isa in Arabic) will descend on Mount Afeeq, on the white Eastern Minaret of Damascus [the Minaret of 'Isa in the Umayyad Mosque].

Ibn Arabi

Ibn 'ArabiIbn al-'ArabiIbn al-Arabi
The conception of Jesus as described by Ibn Arabi (d.
Later he had several more visions of Jesus and called him his "first guide to the path of God".

Maryam (surah)

MaryamSurah Maryam19
The birth narrative in the Quran for Jesus begins at Maryam (19) 16-34 and al-Imran (3) 45-53.
It is named after Mary, the mother of Jesus (Isa), who appears in verses 16–34.

Al Imran

Al-i-ImranAl-ImranSura 3
The birth narrative in the Quran for Jesus begins at Maryam (19) 16-34 and al-Imran (3) 45-53.
This chapter is named after the family of Imran, which includes Imran, Saint Anne, Mary, and Jesus.

John the Baptist

St. John the BaptistSaint John the BaptistSt John the Baptist
The account of Jesus begins with a prologue narrated several times in the Quran first describing the birth of his mother, Mary, and her service in the Jerusalem temple, while under the care of the prophet and priest Zechariah, who was to be the father of John the Baptist.
He is believed by Muslims to have been a witness to the word of God, and a prophet who would herald the coming of Jesus.

Al-Ma'ida

5Surah 5:31al-Maʼidah
In the fifth chapter of the Quran, al-Maida (5) 112-115, a narration mentions the disciples of Jesus requesting a table laden with food, and for it to be a special day of commemoration for them in the future.
The chapter's topics include animals which are forbidden, Jesus' and Moses' missions.

Flight into Egypt

Flight to EgyptThe Flight into EgyptHoly Family in Egypt
The Quran does not include the tradition of the Flight into Egypt, though sūra XXIII, 50 could conceivably allude to it: “And we made the son of Maryam and his mother a sign; and we made them abide in an elevated place, full of quiet and watered with springs”.
The Qur'ān does not include the tradition of the Flight into Egypt, though sūra XXIII, 50 could conceivably allude to it: “And we made the son of Maryam and his mother a sign; and we made them abide in an elevated place, full of quiet and watered with springs”.

Disciples of Jesus in Islam

disciplesDisciples of Jesusal-Hawariyyūn
The Quran states that Jesus was aided by a group of disciples who believed in His message.
The Quranic account of the disciples (الحواريون al-ḥawāriyyūn) of Jesus does not include their names, numbers, or any detailed accounts of their lives.

Mahdi

Imam MahdiMahdīMahdism
According to Islamic tradition which describes this graphically, Jesus' descent will be in the midst of wars fought by al-Mahdi (lit.
In most traditions, the Mahdi will arrive with 'Isa (Jesus) to defeat Al-Masih ad-Dajjal ("the false Messiah", or Antichrist).

Torah in Islam

TawratTorahal-Tawrat
Muslims believe that God revealed to Jesus a new scripture, al-Injīl (the Gospel), while also declaring the truth of the previous revelations: al-Tawrat (the Torah) and al-Zabur (the Psalms).
According to 7:157, Muhammad is written about in both the Injil (Gospel), revelations to Jesus (Isa) and the Tawrat,

Resurrection of Jesus

resurrectionResurrection of Christresurrection of Jesus Christ
According to mainstream Islamic interpretations of the Quran, he was neither crucified nor raised from the dead, but rather was saved by God.
Muslims believe that ʿĪsā (Jesus) son of Mariam (Mary) was a holy prophet with a divine message.

Virgin birth of Jesus

virgin birthBirth of Jesusvirgin birth of Christ
The Quran and most hadiths (testimonial reports) mention Jesus to have been born a "pure boy" (without sin) to Mary as the result of virginal conception, similar to the event of the Annunciation in Christianity.