Jewelle Gomez

Jewelle Gomez (born September 11, 1948) is an American author, poet, critic and playwright.wikipedia
119 Related Articles

Firebrand Books

Describing herself as a possible "foremother of Afrofuturism," Gomez is the author of seven books, including the double Lambda Literary Award-winning novel The Gilda Stories (Firebrand Books, 1991).
The press has published poetry, fiction, and non-fiction by many luminary authors, including Jewelle Gomez, Leslie Feinberg, Cheryl Clarke, Ruthann Robson, Lesléa Newman, Mab Segrest, Leslie Feinberg, Judith Katz, Audre Lorde, and Minnie Bruce Pratt, earning four American Library Association Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual Book Awards and 12 Lambda Literary Awards, including the Publisher's Service Award for Bereano, in 1996.

Dark Matter (prose anthologies)

Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African DiasporaDark MatterDark Matter: Reading The Bones
Her fiction and poetry is included in more than a hundred anthologies, including the first anthology of Black speculative fiction, Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora (2000) edited by Sheree R. Thomas; Home Girls: a Black Feminist Anthology from Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press, Daughters of Africa edited by Margaret Busby (1992), and Best American Poetry of 2001, edited by Robert Hass.

Lambda Literary Award

Lambda Literary AwardsLambda AwardLambda Book Award
Describing herself as a possible "foremother of Afrofuturism," Gomez is the author of seven books, including the double Lambda Literary Award-winning novel The Gilda Stories (Firebrand Books, 1991).

Conditions (magazine)

ConditionsConditions'' (magazine)Conditions: Thirteen
She was a member of Conditions, a lesbian feminist literary magazine.

The Gilda Stories

Describing herself as a possible "foremother of Afrofuturism," Gomez is the author of seven books, including the double Lambda Literary Award-winning novel The Gilda Stories (Firebrand Books, 1991).
The Gilda Stories is the debut novel of American author and activist Jewelle Gomez.

Home Girls

Home Girls: A Black Feminist AnthologyHomegirls: A Black Feminist Anthology
Her fiction and poetry is included in more than a hundred anthologies, including the first anthology of Black speculative fiction, Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora (2000) edited by Sheree R. Thomas; Home Girls: a Black Feminist Anthology from Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press, Daughters of Africa edited by Margaret Busby (1992), and Best American Poetry of 2001, edited by Robert Hass.

Daughters of Africa

Daughters of Africa: An International Anthology of Words and Writings by Women of African DescentDaughters of Africa: An International Anthology of Words and Writings by Women of African Descent from the Ancient Egyptian to the Present
Her fiction and poetry is included in more than a hundred anthologies, including the first anthology of Black speculative fiction, Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora (2000) edited by Sheree R. Thomas; Home Girls: a Black Feminist Anthology from Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press, Daughters of Africa edited by Margaret Busby (1992), and Best American Poetry of 2001, edited by Robert Hass.

After Stonewall

She was also interviewed for the 1999 film After Stonewall.
Participants include Dorothy Allison, Jewelle Gomez, Rita Mae Brown, Craig Lucas, Arnie Kantrowitz, Barbara Gittings, Barbara Smith, Larry Kramer and Barney Frank.

GLAAD

Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against DefamationGay and Lesbian Alliance Against DefamationGay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD)
Gomez was on the original staff of Say Brother (now Basic Black), one of the first weekly Black television shows (WGBH-TV Boston, 1968), and was on the founding board of the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) in 1984.
The founding group included film scholar Vito Russo; Gregory Kolovakos, then on the staff of the NYS Arts Council and who later became the first executive director; Darryl Yates Rist; Allen Barnett; and Jewelle Gomez, the organization's first treasurer.

Afrofuturism

AfrofuturistAfrofuturisticAfro-futurism
Describing herself as a possible "foremother of Afrofuturism," Gomez is the author of seven books, including the double Lambda Literary Award-winning novel The Gilda Stories (Firebrand Books, 1991).

Harry Waters Jr.

Harry Waters, Jr.
She authored a play about James Baldwin, Waiting For Giovanni, in 2010 in collaboration with Harry Waters Jr., an actor and professor in the theatre department at MacAlester College.
He is working in collaboration with novelist/playwright Jewelle Gomez on a play about James Baldwin, titled Waiting for Giovanni and scheduled for the 2011-12 (San Francisco) New Conservatory Theater season.

Diane Sabin

The group, co-founded by Andrea Gillespie and Diane Sabin, was designed to educate lesbians who were culturally miseducated—as women—about the use of money and benefits of philanthropy.
She and her partner, Jewelle Gomez, along with twelve other gay couples became part of Woo v Lockyer, a lawsuit against the State of California in 2004.

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
Gomez was raised by her great-grandmother, Grace, who was born on Indian land in Iowa to an African-American mother and Ioway father.

Iowa

IAState of IowaNorthern Iowa
Gomez was raised by her great-grandmother, Grace, who was born on Indian land in Iowa to an African-American mother and Ioway father.

African Americans

African AmericanAfrican-Americanblack
Gomez was raised by her great-grandmother, Grace, who was born on Indian land in Iowa to an African-American mother and Ioway father.

New England

Southern New EnglandNorthern New EnglandNew England region
Grace returned to New England before she was 14, when her father died, and she was married to John E. Morandus, a Wampanoag and descendant of Massasoit, the sachem for whom Massachusetts was named.

Massasoit

OusamequinChief MassasoitSachem Massasoit
Grace returned to New England before she was 14, when her father died, and she was married to John E. Morandus, a Wampanoag and descendant of Massasoit, the sachem for whom Massachusetts was named.

Sachem

sagamoreGrand Sachemsakmow
Grace returned to New England before she was 14, when her father died, and she was married to John E. Morandus, a Wampanoag and descendant of Massasoit, the sachem for whom Massachusetts was named.

Massachusetts

MACommonwealth of MassachusettsMass.
Grace returned to New England before she was 14, when her father died, and she was married to John E. Morandus, a Wampanoag and descendant of Massasoit, the sachem for whom Massachusetts was named.

Off-Broadway

Off BroadwayOff-Broadway theatreoff
Subsequent years in New York City she spent in Black theater including work with the Frank Silvera Writers Workshop and many years as a stage manager for off-Broadway productions.

Iowa people

IowaIowayIowa tribe
Gomez was raised by her great-grandmother, Grace, who was born on Indian land in Iowa to an African-American mother and Ioway father.

Wampanoag

Wampanoag peopleWampanoagsWampanoag Tribe
Grace returned to New England before she was 14, when her father died, and she was married to John E. Morandus, a Wampanoag and descendant of Massasoit, the sachem for whom Massachusetts was named.

Vampire

vampiresvampirismvampiric
This novel has been in print since 1991 and reframes traditional vampire mythology by taking a lesbian feminist perspective; it is an adventure about an escaped slave who comes of age over two hundred years.

Lesbian feminism

lesbian feministlesbianlesbian feminists
This novel has been in print since 1991 and reframes traditional vampire mythology by taking a lesbian feminist perspective; it is an adventure about an escaped slave who comes of age over two hundred years. During this time she became involved in lesbian feminist activism and magazine publication.

Alexis Pauline Gumbs

Alexis Gumbs
The twenty-fifth anniversary edition of The Gilda Stories includes a new foreword written by Gomez as well as an afterword written by Alexis Pauline Gumbs.