Jewish history

Jewishhistoryhistory of Judaismhistory of the Jewish peopleJewshistory of the JewsJewish historianJudaismpostexilic history of Jews
Jewish history is the history of the Jews, and their religion and culture, as it developed and interacted with other peoples, religions and cultures.wikipedia
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Jewish culture

secular Jewish cultureJewishculture
Jewish history is the history of the Jews, and their religion and culture, as it developed and interacted with other peoples, religions and cultures.
Jewish culture in its etymological meaning retains linkage to the Jewish people's land of origin, the people named for the Kingdom of Judah, study of Jewish texts, practice of community charity, and Jewish history.

Babylonian captivity

Babylonian exileexileexile in Babylon
The Jewish diaspora began with the Assyrian captivity and continued on a much larger scale with the Babylonian captivity.
The Babylonian captivity or Babylonian exile is the period in Jewish history during which a number of people from the ancient Kingdom of Judah were captives in Babylonia.

Judaism

JewishJewsJew
Jewish history is the history of the Jews, and their religion and culture, as it developed and interacted with other peoples, religions and cultures. Hasidic Judaism is a branch of Orthodox Judaism that promotes spirituality and joy through the popularisation and internalisation of Jewish mysticism as the fundamental aspects of the Jewish faith.
The history of Judaism spans more than 3,000 years.

Pharisees

PhariseePharisaicpharisaism
As a result, the Pharisees and Sadducees were formed.
Outside Jewish history and literature, Pharisees have been made notable by references in the New Testament to conflicts with John the Baptist and with Jesus.

Tisha B'Av

Ninth of Av fastNinth of Av9th of Ab
Banished from Jerusalem, except for the day of Tisha B'Av, the Jewish population now centred on Galilee and initially in Yavne.
Tisha B'Av (, "the ninth of Av") is an annual fast day in Judaism, on which a number of disasters in Jewish history occurred, primarily the destruction of both Solomon's Temple by the Neo-Babylonian Empire and the Second Temple by the Roman Empire in Jerusalem.

Maimonides

RambamMoses MaimonidesMaimonidean
Jewish thought during this period flourished under famous figures such as Samuel Ha-Nagid, Moses ibn Ezra, Solomon ibn Gabirol Judah Halevi and Moses Maimonides.
Nonetheless, he was posthumously acknowledged as among the foremost rabbinical arbiters and philosophers in Jewish history, and his copious work comprises a cornerstone of Jewish scholarship.

Aliyah

immigratedimmigrantsemigrated
Yechiel had emigrated to Acre in 1260, along with his son and a large group of followers.
For much of Jewish history, most Jews have lived in the diaspora where aliyah was developed as a national aspiration for the Jewish people, although it was not usually fulfilled until the development of the Zionist movement in the late nineteenth century.

Nasi (Hebrew title)

NasiPatriarchatePatriarch
Theodosius did away with the Sanhedrin and abolished the post of Nasi.
Certain great figures from Jewish history have used the title, including Judah the Prince (Judah haNasi), the chief redactor of the Mishnah.

Ezra

Ezra the ScribeArtaxerxes(the Scribe)
After a few generations and with the conquest of Babylonia in 540 BC by the Persian Empire, some adherents led by prophets Ezra and Nehemiah, returned to their homeland and traditional practices.
In Rabbinic traditions, Ezra is metaphorically referred to as the "flowers that appear on the earth" signifying the springtime in the national history of Judaism.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
Jewish history is the history of the Jews, and their religion and culture, as it developed and interacted with other peoples, religions and cultures.
Though few sources mention the exilic periods in detail, the experience of diaspora life, from the Ancient Egyptian rule over the Levant, to Assyrian captivity and exile, to Babylonian captivity and exile, to Seleucid Imperial rule, to the Roman occupation and exile, and the historical relations between Jews and their homeland thereafter, became a major feature of Jewish history, identity and memory.

Jewish mysticism

mysticalmysticismJewish mystical
Hasidic Judaism is a branch of Orthodox Judaism that promotes spirituality and joy through the popularisation and internalisation of Jewish mysticism as the fundamental aspects of the Jewish faith.
Academic study of Jewish mysticism, especially since Gershom Scholem's Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism (1941), distinguishes between different forms of mysticism across different eras of Jewish history.

History of Zionism

raid Jewish settlementspersecution and legal restrictionsProto-Zionism
See Theodor Herzl and History of Zionism.
However, the history of Zionism began earlier and is related to Judaism and Jewish history.

Pumbedita Academy

PumbeditaAcademyPumbdita
The Jews established Talmudic Academies in Babylonia, also known as the Geonic Academies, which became the center for Jewish scholarship and the development of Jewish law in Babylonia from roughly 500 CE to 1038 CE. The two most famous academies were the Pumbedita Academy and the Sura Academy.
Sherira Gaon - 968-1006, Passed the torch to his son Hai Gaon, while he was still a live. The Iggeret Rav Sherira Gaon ("[The] Epistle of Rav Sherira Gaon") is accounted as an important historian source, especially to Jewish history.

Khmelnytsky Uprising

Chmielnicki massacresrebellionuprising
The relatively tolerant Poland had the largest Jewish population in Europe that dated back to 13th century and enjoyed relative prosperity and freedom for nearly four hundred years; however the calm situation there ended when Polish and Lithuanian Jews were slaughtered in the hundreds of thousands by the cossacks during Chmielnicki uprising (1648) and by the Swedish wars (1655).
In Jewish history, the Uprising is known for the concomitant outrages against the Jews who, in their capacity as leaseholders (arendators), were seen by the peasants as their immediate oppressors.

History of the Jews under Muslim rule

ancient Jewish communitiesJews in Arab landsJews in the Muslim lands in the modern era
The precarious existence of Jews under Byzantine rule did not long endure, largely for the explosion of the Muslim religion out of the remote Arabian peninsula (where large populations of Jews resided, see History of the Jews under Muslim Rule for more).
Jewish communities have existed across the Middle East and North Africa since Antiquity.

Expulsions and exoduses of Jews

refugeesexpulsionsJewish refugee
Jewish refugees
In Jewish history, Jews have experienced numerous mass expulsions and have fled from areas after experiencing ostracism and threats of various kinds by various local authorities seeking refuge in other countries.

Historical Jewish population comparisons

By the year 1900former sizesJewish population
Historical Jewish population comparisons
In addition, assimilation and forced conversions have also impacted Jewish population sizes throughout Jewish history.

Timeline of Jewish history

Jewish Historyrabbinical period
Timeline of Jewish history
See also Jewish history which includes links to individual country histories.

Hellenistic Judaism

Hellenistic JewishHellenized JewsHellenistic
The book of Acts in the New Testament, as well as other Pauline texts, make frequent reference to the large populations of Hellenised Jews in the cities of the Roman world.
History of Judaism

Sasanian Empire

SasanianSassanidPersian
In the belief of restoration to come, in the early 7th century the Jews made an alliance with the Persians, who invaded Palaestina Prima in 614, fought at their side, overwhelmed the Byzantine garrison in Jerusalem, and were given Jerusalem to be governed as an autonomy.
Important developments in Jewish history are associated with the Sassanian Empire.

Port Jew

In the 1990s, the concept of the "Port Jew" has been suggested as an "alternate path to modernity" that was distinct from the European Haskalah.
During the early modern period, wives of Port Jew merchants participated in business through their approach of marriage as a business partnership.

Haskalah

maskilimmaskilJewish Enlightenment
In the 1990s, the concept of the "Port Jew" has been suggested as an "alternate path to modernity" that was distinct from the European Haskalah. In contrast to the cosmopolitan Court Jew, the second social type presented by historians of modern Jewry is the maskil, (learned person), a proponent of the Haskalah (Enlightenment).
Even as emancipation eased integration into wider society and assimilation prospered, the haskalah also resulted in the creation of secular Jewish culture, with an emphasis on Jewish history and Jewish identity, rather than religion.

Pogrom

pogromsanti-Jewish riotsViolence
These persecutions, along with state-sponsored pogroms in Russia in the late 19th century, led a number of Jews to believe that they would only be safe in their own nation.

Mordechai Scheiner

The Chief Rabbi of Birobidzhan, Mordechai Scheiner, says there are 4,000 Jews in the capital city.
Pupils learn about Jewish history, and the Hebrew and Yiddish languages.

History of the Jews in Russia

Russian JewishRussian-JewishRussia
History of the Jews in Russia
Jewish history and Jewish diaspora