Jewish name

Jewishhad only one nameHebrew surnamein Israel
The Jewish name has historically varied, encompassing throughout the centuries several different traditions.wikipedia
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Adin

It was also quite usual that Hebrew names were translated into their corresponding meaning in the Arabic language, such as Adin into Latif, or Loutfi, Eleazar into Mansour, Gershom into Ghareeb, Mazliach into Maimun, Sameah into Said, and Tovia into Hassan, or Hassoun.
However, the Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain have no records of this as a Jewish family name.

Jewish surname

Jewishsurnamesurnames
Jewish surnames
Jewish name

Onomastics

onomasticonomasticianonomatologist
This article looks at the onomastics practices of the Jewish people, that is, the history of the origin and forms of proper names.

Patronymic

patronymibnbin
Jews have historically used Hebrew patronymic names.

Jacob

Israelsons of JacobJacob (Israel)
The name conferred upon a person in early Biblical times was generally connected with some circumstance of that person's birth—several of Jacob's sons are recorded as having received their names in this manner (Genesis 30).

Book of Genesis

GenesisGen.Gen
The name conferred upon a person in early Biblical times was generally connected with some circumstance of that person's birth—several of Jacob's sons are recorded as having received their names in this manner (Genesis 30).

Moses

MosaicMosheMusa
Occasionally, persons other than the parents were the name-givers, as in the cases of Moses (Exodus 2:10) and Solomon (II Samuel 12:25).

Book of Exodus

ExodusEx.Shemot
Occasionally, persons other than the parents were the name-givers, as in the cases of Moses (Exodus 2:10) and Solomon (II Samuel 12:25).

Solomon

King SolomonSalomonSolomonic magic
Occasionally, persons other than the parents were the name-givers, as in the cases of Moses (Exodus 2:10) and Solomon (II Samuel 12:25).

Books of Samuel

1 Samuel2 SamuelSamuel
Occasionally, persons other than the parents were the name-givers, as in the cases of Moses (Exodus 2:10) and Solomon (II Samuel 12:25).

Babylonian captivity

Babylonian exileexileexile in Babylon
Before the Babylonian exile, it was not common practice to name children after their relatives, even in the royal family—none of the twenty-one kings of Judah was named after a predecessor, or after David, the founder of the dynasty.

Kingdom of Judah

Judahking of JudahJudahite
Before the Babylonian exile, it was not common practice to name children after their relatives, even in the royal family—none of the twenty-one kings of Judah was named after a predecessor, or after David, the founder of the dynasty.

David

King DavidDavid and GoliathDavidic
Before the Babylonian exile, it was not common practice to name children after their relatives, even in the royal family—none of the twenty-one kings of Judah was named after a predecessor, or after David, the founder of the dynasty.

David and Jonathan

JonathanDavidclose personal friendship
On the other hand, a son of Jonathan and of King Saul were each named Meribaal (II Samuel 21:7 and following).

Saul

King Saulbattle of GilboaKing Saul of Israel
On the other hand, a son of Jonathan and of King Saul were each named Meribaal (II Samuel 21:7 and following).

Mephibosheth

On the other hand, a son of Jonathan and of King Saul were each named Meribaal (II Samuel 21:7 and following).

Ahitub

Thus, Ahitub has two sons, Ahijah and Ahimelech.

Ahijah

Thus, Ahitub has two sons, Ahijah and Ahimelech.

Ahimelech

Thus, Ahitub has two sons, Ahijah and Ahimelech.

Jaazaniah

Ja'azanaiahJaazaniah ben Shaphanseal of Jaazaniah
It became traditional to identify a son by his father's name and a chosen name, like Jaazaniah ben Shaphan (Ezekiel 8:11) only in later years of Hebrew history.

Ezekiel

Ez.EzekialEzekiel's vision of dry bones
It became traditional to identify a son by his father's name and a chosen name, like Jaazaniah ben Shaphan (Ezekiel 8:11) only in later years of Hebrew history.

Eponym

eponymousself-titledeponyms
In addition, a considerable number of these names are probably eponyms.

Israelites

IsraeliteIsraelchildren of Israel
There is little doubt that this applies to the names of the Israelite clans, each of which was assumed to be descended from the descendants of Jacob, described in Numbers 26.

Book of Numbers

NumbersBamidbarNum.
There is little doubt that this applies to the names of the Israelite clans, each of which was assumed to be descended from the descendants of Jacob, described in Numbers 26.

Jephthah

JephthaJephteJephthah's Daughter
Jephthah implies "first-born", as does Becher, while names like Manasseh, Nahum, and Nehemiah refer probably to children who have come to take the place of others that have died in childhood.