Maimonides (artist's conceptual drawing)
Herod's Temple as imagined in the Holyland Model of Jerusalem. It is currently situated adjacent to the Shrine of the Book exhibit at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.
Morning Prayer, 2005.
A page of a medieval Jerusalem Talmud manuscript, from the Cairo Geniza
The Trumpeting Place inscription, a stone (2.43×1 m) with Hebrew writing "To the Trumpeting Place" uncovered during archaeological excavations by Benjamin Mazar at the southern foot of the Temple Mount is believed to be a part of the complex of the Second Temple.
Jews praying in Jerusalem (HaKotel HaMaaravi), 2010.
Torah scroll
Remnants of the 1st-century Stairs of Ascent in front of the Double Gate, discovered by archaeologist Benjamin Mazar.
Rabbi Yisrael Meir HaCohen Kagan—the "Chofetz Chaim"—at prayer towards the end of his life.
The single scroll of the arm-tefillin
Diagram of the Temple (top of diagram is north)
An Israeli soldier lays tefillin at the Western Wall (Kotel) prior to prayer.
A sukkah booth
Model of Second Temple made by Michael Osnis from Kedumim.
Members of the Israel Defense Forces' Givati Brigade pray the Evening Service (Ma'ariv) at the Western Wall, October 2010.
A Ketubah in Hebrew, a Jewish marriage-contract outlining the duties of the husband.
Ezekiel's Temple as imagined by Charles Chipiez in the 19th century.
IDF soldier, Asael lubotzky prays with tefillin.
Herod's Temple, as imagined in the Holyland Model of Jerusalem. It is currently situated adjacent to the Shrine of the Book exhibit at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.
Model of the First Temple, included in a Bible manual for teachers (1922)
Minyan Ma'ariv prayer in a Jaffa Tel Aviv flea-market shop
The Sanhedrin, from an 1883 encyclopedia
An imaginary view of the Temple as a huge fortress in the foreground, 1721
Jewish women praying by the Western Wall, early 1900s
Title page from Sefer Shaarei Teshuvah (1960 pocket edition) by Yonah Gerondi (d.1263), first published in 1505.
The Foundation Stone in the floor of the Dome of the Rock shrine in Jerusalem. The round hole at upper left penetrates to a small cave, known as the Well of Souls, below. The cage-like structure just beyond the hole covers the stairway entrance to the cave (south is towards the top of the image).
Women praying in the Western Wall tunnel at the closest physical point to the Holy of Holies
Title page of Karo's Shulchan Aruch
The bottom of the Foundation Stone, photo taken from the Well of Souls
Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, known as "the Lubavitcher Rebbe", studied the Mishneh Torah daily and encouraged other Jews to follow along with him in an annual study cycle.
Arch of Titus relief showing the Menorah from the Temple as spoils of the Romans

It is the only Medieval-era work that details all of Jewish observance, including those laws that are only applicable when the Temple in Jerusalem is in existence, and remains an important work in Judaism.

- Mishneh Torah

Jewish rabbi and philosopher Moses Maimonides gave the following definition of "Temple" in his Mishne Torah (Hil.

- Temple in Jerusalem

Afternoon prayer: Mincha or Minha, named for the flour offering that accompanied sacrifices at the Temple in Jerusalem,

- Jewish prayer

9) Tefilah and Birkat Kohanim: prayer and the priestly blessing

- Mishneh Torah

Another formulation of the prayers was that appended by Maimonides to the laws of prayer in his Mishneh Torah: this forms the basis of the Yemenite liturgy, and has had some influence on other rites.

- Jewish prayer

The Temple is mentioned extensively in Orthodox services.

- Temple in Jerusalem
Maimonides (artist's conceptual drawing)

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Torah scroll at old Glockengasse Synagogue (reconstruction), Cologne

Torah

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Compilation of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, namely the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy.

Compilation of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, namely the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy.

Torah scroll at old Glockengasse Synagogue (reconstruction), Cologne
Silver Torah case, Ottoman Empire, displayed in the Museum of Jewish Art and History
Reading of the Torah
One common formulation of the documentary hypothesis
The supplementary hypothesis, one potential successor to the documentary hypothesis
Presentation of The Torah, by Édouard Moyse, 1860, Museum of Jewish Art and History
Torahs in Ashkenazi Synagogue (Istanbul, Turkey)
Page pointers, or yad, for reading of the Torah
Open Torah case with scroll.

In the modern era, adherents of Orthodox Judaism practice Torah-reading according to a set procedure they believe has remained unchanged in the two thousand years since the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem (70 CE).

The division of parashot found in the modern-day Torah scrolls of all Jewish communities (Ashkenazic, Sephardic, and Yemenite) is based upon the systematic list provided by Maimonides in Mishneh Torah, Laws of Tefillin, Mezuzah and Torah Scrolls, chapter 8.

Manuscript Torah scrolls are still scribed and used for ritual purposes (i.e., religious services); this is called a Sefer Torah ("Book [of] Torah").