Jewish surname

Jewishsurnamesurnamesadoption of Spanish Old Christian gentile surnames by Sephardic Jewsfamily surnameGerman Jews were obliged to take a second nameJewish surnames originated in the Russian EmpireJewish-Ashkenazinames picked
Jewish surnames are family names of Jews that are not pseudonyms.wikipedia
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Shulman

Some traditional surnames relate to Jewish history or roles within the religion, such as Cohen, Levi, Shulman, Sofer, or Kantor, while many others relate to a secular occupation or place names.
Shulman is a Jewish-Ashkenazi surname that means literally "shul-man" ("synagogue-man").

Cohen (surname)

CohenCohnHaCohen
Some traditional surnames relate to Jewish history or roles within the religion, such as Cohen, Levi, Shulman, Sofer, or Kantor, while many others relate to a secular occupation or place names.
Cohen (, kōhēn, "priest") is a Jewish surname of biblical origins (see: Kohen).

Greenberg

Some names may seem to be derived artificially, but can also refer to towns, e.g., Birnbaum (translated into "Peartree"), Rosenberg, Kornberg, Sommerfeld, Grünberg (hence Greenberg), Goldberg, and Rubinstein/Rubenstein.
Greenberg is a surname common in North America, with anglicized spelling of the German Grünberg (green mountain) or the Jewish Ashkenazi Yiddish Grinberg, an artificial surname.

Gordon (surname)

Gordon
The name Gordon may in some cases be derived from the Russian Grodno but is also said to have been adopted by Jews in the Russian Empire in honor of Lord George Gordon (1751–1793), a Scottish nobleman who converted to Judaism in 1787 in Birmingham.
Gordon is also a Jewish surname, likely derived from the city of Grodno, in Belarus.

Altschuler

The names Altschul or Altschuler are derived from the Altschul ("old school/synagogue") of Prague.
Altschuler, Altshuler, Altschuller, Altshuller, Altschueler, Altshueler, or Alschuler is a Jewish surname of Ashkenazi origin.

Altschul

The names Altschul or Altschuler are derived from the Altschul ("old school/synagogue") of Prague.
Altschul or Altshul is a Jewish surname of Ashkenazi origin.

Hebraization of surnames

HebraizedHebraizechanged his last name
Jews have some of the largest varieties of surnames among any ethnic group, owing to the widespread Jewish diaspora that has existed for thousands of years, as well as cultural assimilation and fairly recent Hebraization of surnames.
Jewish surname

German name

GermanGerman surnamefamily name
German family name etymology
The surnames of the German Jews are a special case, as they were introduced later, in the late 18th to early 19th century, per fiat.

Alexander Beider

Alexander Beider: A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from Galicia. Avotaynu, Bergenfield, 2004, ISBN: 1-886223-19-X.
His works deal with etymology and geographic distribution of Jewish surnames, traditional Yiddish given names, methodological principles of studying names, and the history of Yiddish.

Jewish name

Jewishhad only one nameHebrew surname
Jewish name
Jewish surnames

Jewish diaspora

diasporaExilediaspora Jews
Jews have some of the largest varieties of surnames among any ethnic group, owing to the widespread Jewish diaspora that has existed for thousands of years, as well as cultural assimilation and fairly recent Hebraization of surnames.

Cultural assimilation

assimilationassimilatedassimilate
Jews have some of the largest varieties of surnames among any ethnic group, owing to the widespread Jewish diaspora that has existed for thousands of years, as well as cultural assimilation and fairly recent Hebraization of surnames.

Levi (surname)

LeviLevi or LéviLévi, Levi
Some traditional surnames relate to Jewish history or roles within the religion, such as Cohen, Levi, Shulman, Sofer, or Kantor, while many others relate to a secular occupation or place names.

Sofer

scribescribessofer stam
Some traditional surnames relate to Jewish history or roles within the religion, such as Cohen, Levi, Shulman, Sofer, or Kantor, while many others relate to a secular occupation or place names.

Cantor

cantorsKantor
Some traditional surnames relate to Jewish history or roles within the religion, such as Cohen, Levi, Shulman, Sofer, or Kantor, while many others relate to a secular occupation or place names.

Hebrew language

HebrewHeb.Hebrew-language
Historically, Jews used Hebrew patronymic names.

Patronymic

patronymibnbin
Historically, Jews used Hebrew patronymic names.

Aramaic language

AramaicChaldeeAram.
(Bar-, "son of" in Aramaic, is also seen).

Iberian Peninsula

IberiaIberianPeninsula
Permanent family surnames exist today but only gained popularity among Sephardic Jews in Iberia and elsewhere as early as the 10th or 11th century and did not spread widely to the Ashkenazic Jews of Germany or Eastern Europe until the 18th and 19th century, where the adoption of German surnames was imposed in exchange for Jewish emancipation.

Jewish emancipation

emancipationemancipation of the Jewsemancipated
Permanent family surnames exist today but only gained popularity among Sephardic Jews in Iberia and elsewhere as early as the 10th or 11th century and did not spread widely to the Ashkenazic Jews of Germany or Eastern Europe until the 18th and 19th century, where the adoption of German surnames was imposed in exchange for Jewish emancipation.

Synagogue

synagoguesshultemple
It is used in synagogue and in documents in Jewish law such as the ketubah (marriage contract).

Halakha

Jewish lawhalakhichalachic
It is used in synagogue and in documents in Jewish law such as the ketubah (marriage contract).

Ketubah

ketubaketubotmarriage contract
It is used in synagogue and in documents in Jewish law such as the ketubah (marriage contract).

Alhambra Decree

expulsion of the Jews from Spainexpulsion from Spainexpelled from Spain
Among the Sephardim this practice was common long before the exile from Spain, and probably became still more common as a result of the example of the conversos, who on adopting Christianity accepted in most cases the family names of their godfathers.

Converso

conversosconverted to Christianityconvert
Among the Sephardim this practice was common long before the exile from Spain, and probably became still more common as a result of the example of the conversos, who on adopting Christianity accepted in most cases the family names of their godfathers.