Joe (1970 film)

JoeJoe'' (1970 film)1970
Joe is a 1970 American drama film distributed by Cannon Films and starring Peter Boyle, Dennis Patrick and Susan Sarandon in her film debut.wikipedia
75 Related Articles

Peter Boyle

Joe is a 1970 American drama film distributed by Cannon Films and starring Peter Boyle, Dennis Patrick and Susan Sarandon in her film debut.
Boyle, who won an Emmy Award in 1996 for a guest-starring role on the science-fiction drama The X-Files, won praise in both comedic and dramatic parts following his breakthrough performance in the 1970 film Joe.

Susan Sarandon

Joe is a 1970 American drama film distributed by Cannon Films and starring Peter Boyle, Dennis Patrick and Susan Sarandon in her film debut.
Sarandon began her career in the film Joe (1970), before appearing in the soap opera A World Apart (1970–71).

John G. Avildsen

John AvildsenAvildsenJohn
The film was directed by John G. Avildsen.
Other films he directed include Joe (1970), Save the Tiger (1973), The Formula (1980), Neighbors (1981), Lean on Me (1989), Rocky V (1990), 8 Seconds (1994) and the first three The Karate Kid films.

Dennis Patrick

Joe is a 1970 American drama film distributed by Cannon Films and starring Peter Boyle, Dennis Patrick and Susan Sarandon in her film debut.
Among his other television appearances were the roles of Jason McGuire and Paul Stoddard in Dark Shadows, Mac in Somerset, and in such films as The Time Travelers (1964), Daddy's Gone A-Hunting (1969), Joe (1970), Dear Dead Delilah (1972) and Nightmare Honeymoon (1974).

Norman Wexler

Norman Wexler's screenplay received an Oscar nomination for Best Original Screenplay.
Norman Wexler (August 6, 1926 – August 23, 1999) was an American screenwriter whose work included films such as Saturday Night Fever, Serpico and Joe.

1970 in film

19701969/701970 film
Produced on a tight budget of only $106,000, it grossed over $19.3 million in the United States, making it the 13th highest-grossing film of 1970.

Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay

Best Original ScreenplayAcademy AwardBest Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen
Norman Wexler's screenplay received an Oscar nomination for Best Original Screenplay.

Crazy Joe (film)

Crazy JoeCrazy Joe'' (1974)Crazy Joe'' (film)
Boyle nevertheless played a ruthless gangster four years later in Crazy Joe (not a sequel) and a not-so-ruthless gangster in the comedy Johnny Dangerously.
The film stars Peter Boyle in the title role (not to be confused with his title role in the 1970 film, Joe), with Paula Prentiss, Fred Williamson, Rip Torn, Luther Adler, Henry Winkler and Eli Wallach.

The Cannon Group, Inc.

Cannon FilmsThe Cannon GroupCannon Film Distributors
Joe is a 1970 American drama film distributed by Cannon Films and starring Peter Boyle, Dennis Patrick and Susan Sarandon in her film debut.
By 1970, they had produced films on a larger production scale than a lot of major distributors, such as Joe, starring Peter Boyle.

K Callan

K. Callan
She appeared in the films Joe (1970), The Onion Field, (1979), A Touch of Class (1973), American Gigolo (1980), A Change of Seasons (1980) and Fast-Walking (1982), as well as the television adaptation of the Lanford Wilson play The Rimers of Eldritch.

Exuma (musician)

ExumaAnthony McKayMcFarland Gregory Anthony McKay
Joe also featured an original soundtrack, introducing artists such as Exuma with the song "You Don't Know What's Going On", Dean Michaels' "Hey Joe" (not a version of the song made famous by the Leaves, Jimi Hendrix, and others), and other original songs by Jerry Butler and Bobby Scott.
McKay also garnered recognition for his song "You Don't Know What's Going On", which was featured on the soundtrack of John G. Avildsen's 1970 film Joe.

Bobby Scott (musician)

Bobby ScottBob ScottRobert Scott
Joe also featured an original soundtrack, introducing artists such as Exuma with the song "You Don't Know What's Going On", Dean Michaels' "Hey Joe" (not a version of the song made famous by the Leaves, Jimi Hendrix, and others), and other original songs by Jerry Butler and Bobby Scott.
He also composed film soundtracks, including the scores to Slaves (1969) and Joe (1970).

Drama (film and television)

drama filmdramatelevision drama
Joe is a 1970 American drama film distributed by Cannon Films and starring Peter Boyle, Dennis Patrick and Susan Sarandon in her film debut.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Advertising executive Bill Compton, his wife Joan, and daughter Melissa are a wealthy family living in New York's Upper East Side.

Upper East Side

Upper East Side, ManhattanUpper East Side of ManhattanUpper East
Advertising executive Bill Compton, his wife Joan, and daughter Melissa are a wealthy family living in New York's Upper East Side.

Drug overdose

overdoseoverdosingoverdosed
After Melissa overdoses and is sent to a hospital, Compton goes to her boyfriend's apartment to get her clothes.

Hippie

hippieshippyhippie movement
At a nearby bar he hears factory worker Joe Curran ranting about how he hates hippies, and Compton blurts out that he just killed one.

Blackmail

blackmailingblackmailerblackmailed
At first Compton is wary that Joe may be attempting blackmail, but Joe assures him that he admires Compton for killing the drug dealer.

Manhattan

Manhattan, New YorkManhattan, New York CityNew York
Joe and Compton search for her, and meet a group of hippies at a bar in downtown Manhattan.

Commune

communalcommunescommunally
Joe beats one of the girls until she tells him that their boyfriends often spend time in an upstate commune.

Review aggregator

review aggregationComic Book Roundupreview aggregate
Joe received mostly positive reviews from critics, earning a 80% "Fresh" rating on the review aggregate website Rotten Tomatoes.

Rotten Tomatoes

RottenTomatoes.comGolden Tomato AwardsGolden Tomato
Joe received mostly positive reviews from critics, earning a 80% "Fresh" rating on the review aggregate website Rotten Tomatoes.

Variety (magazine)

VarietyDaily VarietyVariety magazine
Variety wrote, "It sounds like heavy stuff, but scripter Norman Wexler has fleshed his serious skeleton with both melodrama plotting that sustains interest and the grittiest, most obscene dialog yet to boom from the silver screen. It works."

Howard Thompson (film critic)

Howard Thompson
Howard Thompson of The New York Times wrote, "The sad, disappointing thing about 'Joe' is that a devastating, original idea cynically slopes into a melodramatic, surface fiasco."