Joe Buck

JoeJoe Duck
Joseph Francis Buck (born April 25, 1969) is an American sportscaster and the son of sportscaster Jack Buck.wikipedia
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Jack Buck

BuckJackJack Buck Statue
Joseph Francis Buck (born April 25, 1969) is an American sportscaster and the son of sportscaster Jack Buck.
The later part of his career found him working side-by-side in the Cardinals booth with his son Joe Buck, who also has risen to national sportscasting prominence.

National Sports Media Association

National Sportscasters and Sportswriters AssociationNational Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association Hall of FameNSSA
He has won numerous Sports Emmy Awards for his work with Fox Sports, including his roles as lead play-by-play announcer for the network's National Football League and Major League Baseball coverage, and is a three-time recipient of the National Sportscaster of the Year award.

Fox Major League Baseball

FoxMLB on FoxMajor League Baseball on Fox
He has won numerous Sports Emmy Awards for his work with Fox Sports, including his roles as lead play-by-play announcer for the network's National Football League and Major League Baseball coverage, and is a three-time recipient of the National Sportscaster of the Year award. In 1996, he was named Fox's lead play-by-play voice for Major League Baseball, teaming with Tim McCarver, who had previously worked with his father on CBS.
As of 2019, Joe Buck is Fox's lead play-by-play commentator (a role he has held since Fox inaugurated its Major League Baseball coverage in 1996), with John Smoltz serving as color analyst; they are joined by field reporter Ken Rosenthal.

Sean McDonough

That year, he became the youngest man to do a national broadcast (for all nine innings and games, as a network employee as opposed to simply being a representative of one of the participating teams) for a World Series, surpassing Sean McDonough, who called the 1992 World Series for CBS at the age of 30.
Coincidentally, that particular record would be broken four years later by Fox's 27-year-old Joe Buck, the son of the man McDonough replaced on CBS, Jack Buck.

Mary Institute and St. Louis Country Day School

St. Louis Country Day SchoolMary InstituteSmith Academy
Buck was born in St. Petersburg, Florida (where the St. Louis Cardinals, for whom his father broadcast, then conducted their spring training) and raised in the St. Louis area, where he attended St. Louis Country Day School.

St. Louis Cardinals

St. Louis BrownsCardinalsSt. Louis
Buck was born in St. Petersburg, Florida (where the St. Louis Cardinals, for whom his father broadcast, then conducted their spring training) and raised in the St. Louis area, where he attended St. Louis Country Day School.
Joe Buck, the son of Jack Buck, was an official member of the Cardinals' broadcast team from 1991 until 2007.

Fox Sports (United States)

Fox SportsFoxsports
He has won numerous Sports Emmy Awards for his work with Fox Sports, including his roles as lead play-by-play announcer for the network's National Football League and Major League Baseball coverage, and is a three-time recipient of the National Sportscaster of the Year award.

Tim McCarver

In 1996, he was named Fox's lead play-by-play voice for Major League Baseball, teaming with Tim McCarver, who had previously worked with his father on CBS. Besides working with Tim McCarver for 18 seasons (1996–2013), Buck also worked with former MLB player and current MLB Network/Fox Sports analyst Harold Reynolds and baseball writer/insider Tom Verducci for 2 seasons (2014–2015).
McCarver was paired with Joe Buck on the Fox network's MLB telecasts, a role he held from 1996 to 2013.

Major League Baseball on CBS

CBSMajor League BaseballCBS Sports
That year, he became the youngest man to do a national broadcast (for all nine innings and games, as a network employee as opposed to simply being a representative of one of the participating teams) for a World Series, surpassing Sean McDonough, who called the 1992 World Series for CBS at the age of 30. Also, in 1991 Buck began broadcasting for the Cardinals on local television and KMOX Radio, filling in while his father was working on CBS telecasts.
Jack Buck's son Joe tried to rationalize his father's on-air problems by saying "My dad was brought up in the golden age of radio, I think he had his hands tied somewhat, being accustomed to the freedom of radio. I'm more used to acquiescing to what the producer wants to do, what the director wants to do."

2004 American League Championship Series

2004 ALCSALCS2004
Since then, Joe has continued to use this phrase at appropriate times, including Game 4 of the 2004 ALCS, in which the Boston Red Sox famously rallied off New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera in the 9th inning to avoid elimination.
Fox commentator Joe Buck said as the series began: "What's hard to believe, it was almost exactly one year ago tonight that Aaron Boone hit that 11th inning home run to beat the Red Sox, yet for some reason it seemed predetermined that we would be right back here a year later for a rematch of sort."

Sports Emmy Award

Sports EmmySports Emmy AwardsEmmy Award
He has won numerous Sports Emmy Awards for his work with Fox Sports, including his roles as lead play-by-play announcer for the network's National Football League and Major League Baseball coverage, and is a three-time recipient of the National Sportscaster of the Year award.

Joe Buck Live

On February 5, 2009, Buck signed with HBO to host a sports-based talk show for the network called Joe Buck Live, with a format similar to that of Costas Now, the monthly HBO program previously hosted by Bob Costas.
Joe Buck Live was a talk show hosted by sportscaster Joe Buck.

Fox NFL Sunday

Fox NFL ThursdayFox's own NFL pregame showNFL Sunday
On August 14, 2006, Buck was named the host of Fox's pregame NFL show, Fox NFL Sunday and postgame doubleheader show.
Cris Collinsworth left the program in 2002, when he was promoted to Fox's newly formed "A Team" of NFL game announcers, alongside Joe Buck and Troy Aikman (replacing Pat Summerall and John Madden).

KMOX

KMOX-AMJack CarneyKMOX NewsRadio 1120
Also, in 1991 Buck began broadcasting for the Cardinals on local television and KMOX Radio, filling in while his father was working on CBS telecasts.

1996 World Series

1996World SeriesWorld Championship
That year, he became the youngest man to do a national broadcast (for all nine innings and games, as a network employee as opposed to simply being a representative of one of the participating teams) for a World Series, surpassing Sean McDonough, who called the 1992 World Series for CBS at the age of 30.

KMOV

KMOV-TVKMOX-TVKMOV-DT3
In 1991, he did reporting for St Louis' CBS affiliate KMOV.

Thom Brennaman

Thom
Thom Brennaman, who has served as Buck's fill-in during the MLB postseason in the past, will handle the Packers-Rams game.
He would return to calling NFL games for Fox full-time in 2009 (Prior to this, Brennaman worked NFL games for FOX previously from 1994-1997, 1999-2000 and 2004-2008 as a regular and/or fill-in announcer), working primarily with Brian Billick (and later, on David Diehl, Charles Davis, and Chris Spielman) but also filling in as lead announcer while Joe Buck did the MLB playoffs.

1992 World Series

1992World Series1992 MLB World Series
That year, he became the youngest man to do a national broadcast (for all nine innings and games, as a network employee as opposed to simply being a representative of one of the participating teams) for a World Series, surpassing Sean McDonough, who called the 1992 World Series for CBS at the age of 30.
McDonough's record would subsequently be broken by Fox's Joe Buck, who at 27 years of age, called the 1996 World Series.

Fox NFL

FoxNFL on FoxThe OT
He has won numerous Sports Emmy Awards for his work with Fox Sports, including his roles as lead play-by-play announcer for the network's National Football League and Major League Baseball coverage, and is a three-time recipient of the National Sportscaster of the Year award.
Following the 1997 season, Joe Buck did not call another NFL game on Fox until 2001.

Fox USGA

FoxFox SportsUSGA Championships
In April 2014, it was announced that Buck would team with Greg Norman to anchor Fox's new package of United States Golf Association telecasts, most prominently the U.S. Open tournament.
Newly named Fox golf hosts Joe Buck and Greg Norman hosted the programming.

1991 St. Louis Cardinals season

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Also, in 1991 Buck began broadcasting for the Cardinals on local television and KMOX Radio, filling in while his father was working on CBS telecasts.

2011 World Series

2011World Series2011 Series
He also used the phrase at the end of Game 6 of the 2011 World Series when the Cardinals' David Freese hit a walk-off home run in the 11th inning against the Rangers to send the series to a seventh game (it was actually 20 years and a day since Kirby Puckett's home run).
Joe Buck called play-by-play on his 14th World Series for the network, dating back to, while color analyst Tim McCarver handled his 22nd World Series since.

2004 Boston Red Sox season

Boston Red Sox2004 Boston Red Sox2004
Since then, Joe has continued to use this phrase at appropriate times, including Game 4 of the 2004 ALCS, in which the Boston Red Sox famously rallied off New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera in the 9th inning to avoid elimination.
Fox commentator Joe Buck famously called the final out, saying: "Back to Foulke. Red Sox fans have longed to hear it: the Boston Red Sox are World Champions!""

Tom Verducci

Besides working with Tim McCarver for 18 seasons (1996–2013), Buck also worked with former MLB player and current MLB Network/Fox Sports analyst Harold Reynolds and baseball writer/insider Tom Verducci for 2 seasons (2014–2015).
He called his first World Series in 2014 for Fox alongside Joe Buck and Harold Reynolds.

John Smoltz

Smoltz
Since 2016 he has been paired with color analyst John Smoltz and field reporter Ken Rosenthal.
Smoltz replaced Harold Reynolds and Tom Verducci, his colleagues from MLB Network, as the lead analyst for Major League Baseball on Fox for the 2016 season, teaming up with Joe Buck.