John Adams

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John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was an American statesman, attorney, diplomat, writer, and Founding Father who served as the second president of the United States, from 1797 to 1801.wikipedia
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United States Declaration of Independence

Declaration of IndependenceAmerican Declaration of IndependenceU.S. Declaration of Independence
He assisted in drafting the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and was its foremost advocate in Congress.
John Adams, a leader in pushing for independence, had persuaded the committee to select Thomas Jefferson to compose the original draft of the document, which Congress edited to produce the final version.

1796 United States presidential election

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Adams was elected to two terms as vice president under President George Washington and was elected as the United States' second president in 1796.
Incumbent Vice President John Adams of the Federalist Party defeated former Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson of the Democratic-Republican Party.

Federalist Party

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He was the first, and only, president elected under the banner of the Federalist Party. During his single term, Adams encountered fierce criticism from the Jeffersonian Republicans and from some in his own Federalist Party, led by his rival Alexander Hamilton.
The only Federalist President was John Adams.

Alien and Sedition Acts

Sedition ActSedition Act of 1798Alien Enemies Act
Adams signed the controversial Alien and Sedition Acts and built up the Army and Navy in the undeclared "Quasi-War" with France.
The Alien and Sedition Acts were four laws passed by the Federalist-dominated 5th United States Congress and signed into law by President John Adams in 1798.

Thoughts on Government

Adams was the primary author of the Massachusetts Constitution in 1780, which influenced the United States' own constitution, as did his earlier Thoughts on Government.
Thoughts on Government, or in full Thoughts on Government, Applicable to the Present State of the American Colonies, was written by John Adams during the spring of 1776 in response to a resolution of the North Carolina Provincial Congress which requested Adams' suggestions on the establishment of a new government and the drafting of a constitution.

White House

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During his term, he became the first president to reside in the executive mansion now known as the White House.
It is located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. and has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800.

Quasi-War

Quasi WarQuasi-War with Franceundeclared war
Adams signed the controversial Alien and Sedition Acts and built up the Army and Navy in the undeclared "Quasi-War" with France.
The Quasi-War (Quasi-guerre) was an undeclared war fought almost entirely at sea between the United States and France from 1798 to 1800, which broke out during the beginning of John Adams's presidency.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
During his single term, Adams encountered fierce criticism from the Jeffersonian Republicans and from some in his own Federalist Party, led by his rival Alexander Hamilton.
He called for mobilization against the French First Republic in 1798–99 under President John Adams, and became Commanding General of the previously disbanded U.S. Army, which he reconstituted, modernized, and readied for war.

1800 United States presidential election

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In his bid for reelection, opposition from Federalists and accusations of despotism from Republicans led to Adams's loss to his former friend Thomas Jefferson, and he retired to Massachusetts.
In what is sometimes referred to as the "Revolution of 1800", Vice President Thomas Jefferson of the Democratic-Republican Party defeated incumbent President John Adams of the Federalist Party.

John Adams Sr.

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John Adams was born on October 30, 1735 (October 19, 1735, Old Style, Julian calendar) to John Adams Sr. and Susanna Boylston.
He was the father of the second U.S. President, John Adams Jr., and grandfather of the sixth President, John Quincy Adams.

John Quincy Adams

AdamsJohn QuincyJohn Q. Adams
He and his wife generated a family of politicians, diplomats, and historians now referred to as the Adams political family, which includes their son John Quincy Adams, the sixth president of the United States. John and Abigail had six children: Abigail "Nabby" in 1765, future president John Quincy Adams in 1767, Susanna in 1768, Charles in 1770, Thomas in 1772, and Elizabeth in 1777.
He was the eldest son of John Adams, who served as the second US president from 1797 to 1801, and First Lady Abigail Adams.

Treaty of Paris (1783)

Treaty of Paris1783 Treaty of ParisTreaty of Paris of 1783
As a diplomat in Europe, he helped negotiate the peace treaty with Great Britain and secured vital governmental loans.
Representing the United States were Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, Henry Laurens, and John Adams.

Braintree, Massachusetts

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Adams was born on the family farm in Braintree, Massachusetts.
The town of Braintree was the birthplace of presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams, as well as statesman John Hancock.

Thomas Jefferson

JeffersonPresident JeffersonJeffersonian
In his bid for reelection, opposition from Federalists and accusations of despotism from Republicans led to Adams's loss to his former friend Thomas Jefferson, and he retired to Massachusetts.
However, he soon resumed collecting for his personal library, writing to John Adams, "I cannot live without books."

Henry Adams (farmer)

Henry AdamsHenry Adams (1583–1646)Henry Adams (Braintree)
Adams's great-grandfather Henry Adams emigrated to Massachusetts from Braintree, Essex, England around 1638.
He was a patrilineal ancestor of U.S. Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams.

Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
Adams was the primary author of the Massachusetts Constitution in 1780, which influenced the United States' own constitution, as did his earlier Thoughts on Government.
A substantial body of thought had been developed from the literature of republicanism in the United States, including work by John Adams and applied to the creation of state constitutions.

Susanna Boylston

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John Adams was born on October 30, 1735 (October 19, 1735, Old Style, Julian calendar) to John Adams Sr. and Susanna Boylston.
Susanna Boylston Adams Hall (March 5, 1708 – April 17, 1797) was a prominent early-American socialite, mother of the second U.S. President, John Adams and the paternal grandmother of the sixth President, John Quincy Adams.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
Adams was elected to two terms as vice president under President George Washington and was elected as the United States' second president in 1796.
Congress created the Continental Army on June 14, 1775, and Samuel and John Adams nominated Washington to become its commander in chief.

Worcester, Massachusetts

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Though his father expected him to be a minister, after his 1755 graduation with an A.B. degree, he taught school temporarily in Worcester, while pondering his permanent vocation.
Between 1755 and 1758, future U.S. president John Adams worked as a schoolteacher and studied law in Worcester.

Continental Congress

CongressContinental CongressmanDelegate to the Continental Congress
Adams was a Massachusetts delegate to the Continental Congress and became a principal leader of the Revolution.
Altogether, 56 delegates attended, including George Washington, Patrick Henry, and John Adams.

Samuel Adams

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Adams was initially less well known than his older cousin Samuel Adams, but his influence emerged from his work as a constitutional lawyer, his analysis of history, and his dedication to republicanism.
He was a second cousin to his fellow Founding Father, President John Adams.

John Adams Birthplace

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Adams was born on the family farm in Braintree, Massachusetts.
It is the saltbox home in which the second president of the United States, John Adams, was born in 1735.

Abigail Adams

AbigailAbigail Smith AdamsAbigail Smith
Adams was a dedicated diarist and regularly corresponded with many important figures in early American history, including his wife and adviser, Abigail.
Abigail Adams (née Smith; November 22, [O.S. November 11] 1744 – October 28, 1818) was the wife and closest advisor of John Adams, as well as the mother of John Quincy Adams.

Charles Adams (1770–1800)

Charles AdamsCharlesCharles Adams (1770-1800)
John and Abigail had six children: Abigail "Nabby" in 1765, future president John Quincy Adams in 1767, Susanna in 1768, Charles in 1770, Thomas in 1772, and Elizabeth in 1777.
Charles Adams (May 29, 1770 – November 30, 1800) was the second son of President John Adams and his wife, Abigail Adams (née Smith).

Joseph Mayhew

At age sixteen, Adams entered Harvard College in 1751, studying under Joseph Mayhew.
His career included being a tutor of John Adams at Harvard, a Preacher, and Chief Justice of Dukes County, Massachusetts.