John Bright

BrightJohn Bright MPJ. BrightMr. Bright, MP
John Bright (16 November 1811 – 27 March 1889) was a British Radical and Liberal statesman, one of the greatest orators of his generation and a promoter of free trade policies.wikipedia
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Richard Cobden

CobdenRichard Cobden MP
In partnership with Richard Cobden, he founded the Anti-Corn Law League, aimed at abolishing the Corn Laws, which raised food prices and protected landowners' interests by levying taxes on imported wheat.
In 1838, he and John Bright founded the Anti-Corn Law League, aimed at abolishing the unpopular Corn Laws, which protected landowners’ interests by levying taxes on imported wheat, thus raising the price of bread.

Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
John Bright (16 November 1811 – 27 March 1889) was a British Radical and Liberal statesman, one of the greatest orators of his generation and a promoter of free trade policies.
The leading Radicals were John Bright and Richard Cobden, who represented the manufacturing towns which had gained representation under the Reform Act.

The mother of parliaments (expression)

The mother of parliaments
He coined the phrase "The mother of parliaments."
"The mother of parliaments" is a phrase coined by the British politician and reformer John Bright in a speech at Birmingham on 18 January 1865.

Cobden–Chevalier Treaty

Cobden Chevalier treatyCobden-Chevalier Treaty of 1860Cobden–Chevalier free trade agreement
Bright also worked with Cobden in another free trade initiative, the Cobden–Chevalier Treaty of 1860, promoting closer interdependence between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the Second French Empire.
In a Parliamentary session of 1859, Cobden's friend and political ally John Bright asked why, instead of spending money on armaments against a possible French invasion, did not the Government attempt to persuade the French Emperor to trade freely with Britain.

Radicals (UK)

RadicalRadicalsEnglish Radical
John Bright (16 November 1811 – 27 March 1889) was a British Radical and Liberal statesman, one of the greatest orators of his generation and a promoter of free trade policies.
Meanwhile Radical leaders like Richard Cobden and John Bright in the middle class Anti-Corn Law League emerged to oppose the existing duties on imported grain which helped farmers and landowners by raising the price of food, but which harmed consumers and manufacturers.

Rochdale

Rochdale (ENG)Rochdale, EnglandEnglish town
Bright was born at Greenbank, Rochdale, in Lancashire, England – one of the early centres of the Industrial Revolution.
The reformer and Member of Parliament, John Bright (1811–1889), was born in Rochdale and gained a reputation as a leader of political dissent and supporter of the Anti-Corn Law League.

Anti-Corn Law League

anti corn law campaignerAnti-Corn LawAnti-Corn Law movement
In partnership with Richard Cobden, he founded the Anti-Corn Law League, aimed at abolishing the Corn Laws, which raised food prices and protected landowners' interests by levying taxes on imported wheat.
The first Anti-Corn Law Association was set up in London in 1836; but it was not until 1838 that the nation-wide League, combining all such local associations, was founded, with Richard Cobden and John Bright among its leaders.

Jacob Bright

His younger brother was Jacob Bright, an MP and mayor.
His elder brother, John Bright, was a radical politician, and his sister, Priscilla Bright McLaren, campaigned for women's rights.

Irving Literary Society (Cornell University)

Irving Literary SocietyIrving Literary Society.Irving Society
Book by G. M. Trevelyan, p. 100, 1913.] Tales of these early years circulated through Britain and the United States late into his career, to the extent that students at institutions such as the young Cornell University regarded him as an exemplar for activities such as the Irving Literary Society.
The second business meeting followed on November 7 with George F. Behringer as President when the society's name was discussed with members equally between the John Bright Brotherhood, honoring the English orator John Bright and others favoring the Irving Literary Association after Washington Irving.

Ackworth School

AckworthAckworth Quaker schoolFriends public school
Jacob Bright was educated at the Ackworth School of the Society of Friends, and apprenticed to a fustian manufacturer at New Mills, Derbyshire. A year at the Ackworth School, two years at Bootham School, York, and a year and a half at Newton, near Clitheroe, completed his education.
John Bright (1811–1889), politician

Duncan McLaren

Duncan McLaren MP
His sisters included Priscilla Bright (whose husband was Duncan McLaren MP) and Margaret Bright Lucas.
McLaren was a Liberal and supported the anti–Corn Law campaign of John Bright, the opening of the Meadows to the public, and the establishment of the Industrial Museum (now the National Museum of Scotland).

Helen Bright Clark

HelenHelen Priestman BrightHelen Priestman Bright Clark
A daughter, Helen, was born to him; but his young wife, after a long illness, died of tuberculosis in September 1841.
In 1840, Clark was born Helen Priestman Bright in Rochdale, Lancashire, England to Quakers Elizabeth Priestman Bright and future Privy Council member, statesman John Bright.

Margaret Bright Lucas

MargaretMargaret Bright
His sisters included Priscilla Bright (whose husband was Duncan McLaren MP) and Margaret Bright Lucas.
A member of a well known Quaker family, several of her ten siblings, including John Bright, Priscilla Bright McLaren and Jacob Bright, became prominent in politics, activism and reform.

Bootham School

Bootham
A year at the Ackworth School, two years at Bootham School, York, and a year and a half at Newton, near Clitheroe, completed his education.
Well known former pupils include the 19th-century parliamentary leader John Bright, mathematician Lewis Fry Richardson ("father of fractals"), historian A. J. P. Taylor, applied linguist Stephen Pit Corder, the leading child psychiatrist Sir Michael Rutter, the famous social reformer Seebohm Rowntree, the Nobel peace prize winner of 1959 Philip John Noel-Baker, Cabinet Secretary Sir Jeremy Heywood and Chief Executive of Marks & Spencer Stuart Rose.

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United KingdomBritishUK
Bright also worked with Cobden in another free trade initiative, the Cobden–Chevalier Treaty of 1860, promoting closer interdependence between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the Second French Empire.
Liberal Unionist John Bright coined the party's catchy slogan, "Home rule means Rome rule."

Birmingham

Birmingham, EnglandCity of BirminghamBirmingham, United Kingdom
Bright coined this famous phrase on 18 January 1865 in a speech at Birmingham supporting an expansion of the franchise. Both John Bright Street, close to the Alexandra Theatre in Birmingham, and Morse's Creek in Australia, now known as Bright, Victoria, were renamed in his honour.
This reputation for having "shaken the fabric of privilege to its base" in 1832 led John Bright to make Birmingham the platform for his successful campaign for the Second Reform Act of 1867, which extended voting rights to the urban working class.

John Albert Bright

Bright, John AlbertJ A BrightJ. A. Bright
Bright married secondly, in June 1847, Margaret Elizabeth Leatham, sister of Edward Aldam Leatham of Wakefield, by whom he had seven children including John Albert Bright and William Leatham Bright.
J A Bright was the eldest son of the Liberal reformer, orator and statesman, John Bright.

Michel Chevalier

This campaign was conducted in collaboration with French economist Michel Chevalier, and succeeded despite Parliament's endemic mistrust of the French.
Together with Richard Cobden and John Bright he prepared the free trade agreement of 1860 between the United Kingdom and France, which is still called the Cobden-Chevalier Treaty.

William Leatham Bright

William
Bright married secondly, in June 1847, Margaret Elizabeth Leatham, sister of Edward Aldam Leatham of Wakefield, by whom he had seven children including John Albert Bright and William Leatham Bright.
Bright was the son of John Bright, M.P., of One Ash, Rochdale and his wife Margaret Elizabeth Leatham.

President of the Board of Trade

First Lord of TradeBoard of TradePresident
He had been all over England and Scotland addressing vast meetings and, as a rule, carrying them with him; he had taken a leading part in a conference held by the Anti-Corn Law League in London had led deputations to the Duke of Sussex, to Sir James Graham, then home secretary, and to Lord Ripon and Gladstone, the secretary and under secretary of the Board of Trade; and he was universally recognised as the chief orator of the Free Trade movement.

Bright, Victoria

Bright
Both John Bright Street, close to the Alexandra Theatre in Birmingham, and Morse's Creek in Australia, now known as Bright, Victoria, were renamed in his honour.
The town was first known as Morse's Creek after F.H. Morse but in 1861 it was renamed in honour of the British orator and politician John Bright.

Joseph Chamberlain

ChamberlainJoseph The Right Honourable '''Joseph Chamberlain
In 1886 when Gladstone proposed Home Rule for Ireland and another Irish Land Act, Bright opposed it, along with Joseph Chamberlain and Lord Hartington.
Chamberlain was one of the 250,000, including the Mayor, who marched for Reform in Birmingham on 27 August 1866; he recalled that "men poured into the hall, black as they were from the factories...the people were packed together like herrings" to listen to a speech by John Bright.

Benjamin Disraeli

DisraeliLord BeaconsfieldBeaconsfield
In a speech in favour of the government bill for a rate in aid (a tax on the prosperous parts of Ireland that would have paid for famine relief in the rest of that island) in 1849, he won loud cheers from both sides, and was complimented by Disraeli for having sustained the reputation of that assembly.
Although Disraeli forged a personal friendship with John Bright, a Lancashire manufacturer and leading Radical, Disraeli was unable to persuade Bright to sacrifice his distinct position for parliamentary advancement.

Manchester

Manchester, EnglandMancunianCity of Manchester
A few days later he set off for Manchester, posting in that wettest of autumns through "the rain that rained away the Corn Laws", and on his arrival got his friends together, and raised the money which tided Cobden over the emergency.
Albert Square has monuments to Prince Albert, Bishop James Fraser, Oliver Heywood, William Ewart Gladstone, and John Bright.

Robert William Dale

R. W. DaleDr. R. W. DaleRobert Dale
In 1880 he was elected Lord Rector of the University of Glasgow, and R. W. Dale wrote of his rectorial address: "It was not the old Bright."
The degree of LL.D. was conferred upon him in 1883 by the University of Glasgow during the lord rectorship of John Bright.