John C. Breckinridge

BreckinridgeJohn Cabell BreckinridgeJohn BreckinridgeJohn BreckenridgeBreckenridgeBreckinridge, John C.Breckenridge Democratic PartyBreckinridge DemocratsDeath of John C. BreckinridgeGeneral Breckinridge
John Cabell Breckinridge (January 16, 1821 – May 17, 1875) was an American lawyer, politician, and soldier.wikipedia
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James Buchanan

BuchananPresident BuchananBuchanan Administration
He was nominated for vice-president at the 1856 Democratic National Convention to balance a ticket headed by James Buchanan.
Buchanan and running mate John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky defeated Republican John C. Frémont and Know-Nothing Millard Fillmore to win the 1856 presidential election.

Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic Party
After serving as a non-combatant during the Mexican–American War, he was elected as a Democrat to the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1849, where he took a states' rights position against interference with slavery.
These Southern Democrats nominated the pro-slavery incumbent Vice President, John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky, for President and General Joseph Lane, former Governor of Oregon, for Vice President.

Confederate States Secretary of War

Secretary of WarConfederate Secretary of WarAssistant Secretary of War
He was appointed Confederate secretary of war in 1865.
The position ended in May 1865 when the Confederacy crumbled during John C. Breckinridge's tenure of the office.

Lexington, Kentucky

LexingtonLexington, KYLexington-Fayette
Breckinridge was born near Lexington, Kentucky to a prominent local family.
Many of 19th-century America's leading political and military figures spent part of their lives in the city, including U.S. President Abraham Lincoln and Confederate President Jefferson Davis (who attended Transylvania University in 1823 and 1824); Confederate general John Hunt Morgan; U.S. Senator and Vice President John C. Breckinridge; and Speaker of the House, U.S. Senator, and Secretary of State Henry Clay, who had a plantation nearby.

Southern Democrats

Southern DemocratDemocraticSouthern Democratic
After Southern Democrats walked out of the 1860 Democratic National Convention, the party's northern and southern factions held rival conventions in Baltimore that nominated Douglas and Breckinridge, respectively, for president.
In the 1860 presidential election, the Republicans nominated Abraham Lincoln, but the divide among Democrats led to the nomination of two candidates: John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky represented Southern Democrats, and Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois represented Northern Democrats.

Stephen A. Douglas

Stephen DouglasDouglasStephen Arnold Douglas
Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1850, he allied with Stephen A. Douglas in support of the Kansas–Nebraska Act.
The rump convention of Northern delegates nominated Douglas for president, while Southern Democrats threw their support behind John C. Breckinridge.

1856 Democratic National Convention

1856Democratic National Convention1856 conventions
He was nominated for vice-president at the 1856 Democratic National Convention to balance a ticket headed by James Buchanan.
The convention selected former Secretary of State James Buchanan of Pennsylvania for president and former Congressman John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky for vice president.

Kentucky in the American Civil War

Kentucky in the Civil WarKentuckyCivil War in Kentucky
Unionists were in control of the state legislature, and gained more support when Confederate forces moved into Kentucky.
Former Vice-Presidents John C. Breckinridge and Richard M. Johnson both hailed from the state, as did Henry Clay, John J. Crittenden, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis.

1860 United States presidential election

1860 presidential election18601860 election
These three men split the Southern vote, while more anti-slavery Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln won all but three electoral votes in the North, allowing him to win the election.
The Southern Democrats, with the support of President Buchanan, held their own convention and nominated Vice President John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky for president.

Breckinridge family

Breckinridge political familyBreckinridgeAlexander Breckenridge
Breckinridge was born near Lexington, Kentucky to a prominent local family.

Cabell Breckinridge

Joseph "Cabell" BreckinridgeJoseph Cabell BreckinridgeCabell
The fourth of six children born to Joseph "Cabell" Breckinridge and Mary Clay (Smith) Breckinridge, he was their only son.
A member of the Breckinridge political family, he was the son of U.S. Attorney General John Breckinridge and the father of Vice President John C. Breckinridge.

1860 Democratic National Conventions

1860 Democratic National Convention1860Democratic National Convention
After Southern Democrats walked out of the 1860 Democratic National Convention, the party's northern and southern factions held rival conventions in Baltimore that nominated Douglas and Breckinridge, respectively, for president.
A group of Southern Democrats met in their own separate convention, adopted a pro-slavery platform, and nominated incumbent Vice President John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky for president and Senator Joseph Lane of Oregon for vice president.

Third Battle of Petersburg

fall of Petersburgbreakthrough at PetersburgBattle of Fort Gregg
After the fall of Richmond, Breckinridge ensured the preservation of Confederate records.
Lee began preparations for the movement and informed Confederate President Jefferson Davis and Confederate States Secretary of War John C. Breckinridge of his conclusions and plan.

Mary Cyrene Burch Breckinridge

Mary Cyrene BurchMary Breckinridge
While at home, he met Bullock's cousin, Mary Cyrene Burch, and by September, they were engaged.
Mary Cyrene Burch Breckinridge (August 16, 1826 – October 8, 1907) was the wife of John C. Breckinridge and served as the Second Lady of the United States from March 4, 1857 until March 4, 1861, while her husband was the 14th Vice President of the United States.

John J. Crittenden

John Jordan CrittendenJohn CrittendenCrittenden
In 1859, he was elected to succeed Senator John J. Crittenden at the end of Crittenden's term in 1861.
A group of legislators, led by John C. Breckinridge, pointed out that the Kentucky Constitution provided only that the lieutenant governor would serve as governor until a new gubernatorial election was held and a qualified successor was chosen.

1856 United States presidential election

18561856 presidential election1856 election
The Democrats won the election, but Breckinridge had little influence with Buchanan and, as presiding officer of the Senate, could not express his opinions in debates.
A host of candidates were nominated for the vice presidency, but a number of them attempted to withdraw themselves from consideration, among them the eventual nominee, John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky.

Constitutional Union Party (United States)

Constitutional Union PartyConstitutional UnionConstitutional Unionist
A third party, the Constitutional Union Party, nominated John Bell.
The 1860 election essentially consisted of two campaigns, as Republican nominee Abraham Lincoln competed with Northern Democratic candidate Stephen A. Douglas in the North, and Bell competed with Southern Democratic candidate John C. Breckinridge in the South.

Clifton R. Breckinridge

Clifton Rhodes BreckinridgeCliftonClifton Breckinridge
1844), Clifton Rodes (b.
He was a member of the prominent Breckinridge family, the son of Vice President of the United States and Confederate General John C. Breckinridge and the great-grandson of U.S. Senator and Attorney General of the United States John Breckinridge.

Confederate States Army

ConfederateConfederate ArmyConfederates
He served in the U.S. Senate during the outbreak of the American Civil War, but was expelled after joining the Confederate Army.

Battle of Missionary Ridge

Missionary RidgeBattle of ChattanoogaChattanooga
After Bragg charged that Breckinridge's drunkenness had contributed to defeats at Stone River and Missionary Ridge, and after Breckinridge joined many other high-ranking officers in criticizing Bragg, he was transferred to the Trans-Allegheny Department, where he won his most significant victory in the 1864 Battle of New Market.
In the center, Maj. Gen. John C. Breckinridge ordered his men to begin fortifying the crest of Missionary Ridge, a task that Bragg had somehow neglected for weeks.

Battle of New Market

New Marketbattle at New Market, VABattle of Newmarket
After Bragg charged that Breckinridge's drunkenness had contributed to defeats at Stone River and Missionary Ridge, and after Breckinridge joined many other high-ranking officers in criticizing Bragg, he was transferred to the Trans-Allegheny Department, where he won his most significant victory in the 1864 Battle of New Market.
Receiving word that the Union Army had entered the Valley, Major General John C. Breckinridge pulled together all available forces to repulse the latest threat.

Andrew Johnson

JohnsonPresident Andrew JohnsonPresident Johnson
When President Andrew Johnson extended amnesty to all former Confederates in 1868, Breckinridge returned to Kentucky, but resisted all encouragement to resume his political career.
Though he was not impressed by either, Johnson campaigned for Buchanan and his running mate, John C. Breckinridge, who were elected.

Battle of Shiloh

ShilohBattle of Pittsburg LandingHornet's Nest
Following the Battle of Shiloh in 1862, he was promoted to major general, and in October he was assigned to the Army of Mississippi under Braxton Bragg.

Valley campaigns of 1864

Shenandoah Valley CampaignShenandoah ValleySheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign
After participating in Jubal Early's campaigns in the Shenandoah Valley, Breckinridge was charged with defending supplies in Tennessee and Virginia.
Sigel was intercepted by 4,000 troops and cadets from the Virginia Military Institute under Confederate Maj. Gen. John C. Breckinridge and defeated.

President of the Confederate States of America

Confederate PresidentPresidentPresident of the Confederate States
In February 1865, Confederate President Jefferson Davis appointed him Secretary of War.
Late on the evening of April 2, 1865, President Davis, his aides, and members of the presidential Cabinet, except C.S. Secretary of War John C. Breckinridge, departed from the burning capital city of Richmond going southwest on the Richmond and Danville Railroad shortly before Union troops occupied it.