John Calvin

CalvinJean CalvinCalvinistDoctrine of CalvinJohannes CalvinCalvijnCalvin's GenevaCalvin, JohnCalvinismCalvinistic
John Calvin ( Jean Calvin ; born Jehan Cauvin; 10 July 1509 – 27 May 1564) was a French theologian, pastor and reformer in Geneva during the Protestant Reformation.wikipedia
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Calvinism

CalvinistReformedCalvinists
He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism, aspects of which include the doctrines of predestination and of the absolute sovereignty of God in salvation of the human soul from death and eternal damnation, in which doctrines Calvin was influenced by and elaborated upon the Augustinian and other Christian traditions.
Calvinism (also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice set down by John Calvin and other Reformation-era theologians.

Geneva

Geneva, SwitzerlandGenèveGeneve
Jean Calvin ; born Jehan Cauvin; 10 July 1509 – 27 May 1564) was a French theologian, pastor and reformer in Geneva during the Protestant Reformation. In that same year, Calvin was recruited by Frenchman William Farel to join the Reformation in Geneva, where he regularly preached sermons throughout the week; but the governing council of the city resisted the implementation of their ideas, and both men were expelled.
After 1400 it became the Genevois province of Savoy (albeit not extending to the city proper, until the reformation of the seat of the Bishop of Geneva).

Augustinian Calvinism

Augustinian–CalvinismCalvin was influenced by and elaborated upon the Augustinian
He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism, aspects of which include the doctrines of predestination and of the absolute sovereignty of God in salvation of the human soul from death and eternal damnation, in which doctrines Calvin was influenced by and elaborated upon the Augustinian and other Christian traditions.
Augustinian–Calvinism is a term used to emphasize the origin of John Calvin's theology within Augustine of Hippo's theology over a thousand years earlier.

Philip Melanchthon

Philipp MelanchthonMelanchthonMelancthon
He also exchanged cordial and supportive letters with many reformers, including Philipp Melanchthon and Heinrich Bullinger.
He stands next to Luther and John Calvin as a reformer, theologian, and moulder of Protestantism.

Institutes of the Christian Religion

InstitutesInstitutio Christianae religionisCalvin's ''Institutes
In addition to his seminal Institutes of the Christian Religion, Calvin wrote commentaries on most books of the Bible, confessional documents, and various other theological treatises.
Institutes of the Christian Religion (Institutio Christianae Religionis) is John Calvin's seminal work of systematic theology.

Heinrich Bullinger

BullingerHenry Bullinger
He also exchanged cordial and supportive letters with many reformers, including Philipp Melanchthon and Heinrich Bullinger.
A much less controversial figure than John Calvin or Martin Luther, his importance has long been underestimated; recent research shows that he was one of the most influential theologians of the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century.

Protestantism

ProtestantProtestantsProtestant church
After religious tensions erupted in widespread deadly violence against Protestant Christians in France, Calvin fled to Basel, Switzerland, where in 1536 he published the first edition of the Institutes.
Reformed (or Calvinist) denominations spread in Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands, Scotland, Switzerland and France by reformers such as John Calvin, Huldrych Zwingli, and John Knox.

Theodore Beza

Théodore de BèzeBezaTheodore de Beze
According to contemporary biographers Theodore Beza and Nicolas Colladon, Gérard believed that Calvin would earn more money as a lawyer than as a priest.
He was a disciple of John Calvin and lived most of his life in Geneva.

Strasbourg

StrassburgStraßburgStrasbourg, France
At the invitation of Martin Bucer, Calvin proceeded to Strasbourg, where he became the minister of a church of French refugees.
Strasbourg played an important part in Protestant Reformation, with personalities such as John Calvin, Martin Bucer, Wolfgang Capito, Matthew and Katharina Zell, but also in other aspects of Christianity such as German mysticism, with Johannes Tauler, Pietism, with Philipp Spener, and Reverence for Life, with Albert Schweitzer.

William Farel

Guillaume FarelFarelGuillaume (William) Farel
In that same year, Calvin was recruited by Frenchman William Farel to join the Reformation in Geneva, where he regularly preached sermons throughout the week; but the governing council of the city resisted the implementation of their ideas, and both men were expelled.
He is most often remembered for having persuaded John Calvin to remain in Geneva in 1536, and for persuading him to return there in 1541, after their expulsion in 1538.

Predestination

double predestinationpredestinedpredestinarian
He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism, aspects of which include the doctrines of predestination and of the absolute sovereignty of God in salvation of the human soul from death and eternal damnation, in which doctrines Calvin was influenced by and elaborated upon the Augustinian and other Christian traditions.
John Calvin rejected the idea that God permits rather than actively decrees the damnation of sinners, as well as other evil.

Gérard Cauvin

Calvin's father, Gérard Cauvin, had a prosperous career as the cathedral notary and registrar to the ecclesiastical court; he died in 1531, after suffering for two years with testicular cancer.
Gérard Calvin (died May 26, 1531) was the father of the Protestant Reformer John Calvin.

Christian theology

Christian doctrineChristian theologiantheology
He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism, aspects of which include the doctrines of predestination and of the absolute sovereignty of God in salvation of the human soul from death and eternal damnation, in which doctrines Calvin was influenced by and elaborated upon the Augustinian and other Christian traditions. Jean Calvin ; born Jehan Cauvin; 10 July 1509 – 27 May 1564) was a French theologian, pastor and reformer in Geneva during the Protestant Reformation.
Eusebius of the early church worked out this threefold classification, which during the Reformation played a substantial role in scholastic Lutheran Christology and in John Calvin's and John Wesley's Christology.

Basel

Basel, SwitzerlandBasleBâle
After religious tensions erupted in widespread deadly violence against Protestant Christians in France, Calvin fled to Basel, Switzerland, where in 1536 he published the first edition of the Institutes.
The first edition of Christianae religionis institutio (Institutes of the Christian Religion – John Calvin's great exposition of Calvinist doctrine) was published at Basel in March 1536.

Renée of France

Renée de FranceRenéeRenée, duchess of Ferrara
Shortly after its publication, he left Basel for Ferrara, Italy, where he briefly served as secretary to Princess Renée of France.
In her later life she became an important supporter of the Protestant Reformation and ally of John Calvin.

Corderius

Mathurin Cordier
Through their assistance, Calvin was able to attend the Collège de la Marche, Paris, where he learned Latin from one of its greatest teachers, Mathurin Cordier.
He taught John Calvin, and Calvin dedicated his Commentaries on the Epistle to the Thessalonians to him.

Protestant Reformers

Protestant reformerreformerReformers
Jean Calvin ; born Jehan Cauvin; 10 July 1509 – 27 May 1564) was a French theologian, pastor and reformer in Geneva during the Protestant Reformation.

Nicolas Cop

One of the reformers, Nicolas Cop, was rector of the university.
Nicolas Cop (born circa 1501 in Paris and died 1540), rector of the University of Paris in late 1533, from 10 October 1533, was a Swiss Protestant Reformer and friend of John Calvin.

Jacopo Sadoleto

Sadolet
When Cardinal Jacopo Sadoleto wrote a letter to the city council inviting Geneva to return to the Catholic faith, the council searched for an ecclesiastical authority to respond to him.
Jacopo Sadoleto (July 12, 1477 – October 18, 1547) was an Italian Roman Catholic cardinal and counterreformer noted for his correspondence with and opposition to John Calvin.

Angoulême

AngoulemeAngoulême, FranceAngoulème
He remained on the move, sheltering with his friend Louis du Tillet in Angoulême and taking refuge in Noyon and Orléans.
John Calvin, the promoter of Protestantism and friend of Jean du Tillet the archdeacon of Angoulême, was forced to flee Paris in 1533 and took refuge in Angoulême in the caves of Rochecorail at Trois-Palis.

Ami Perrin

On 21 September 1540 the council commissioned one of its members, Ami Perrin, to find a way to recall Calvin.
1500 – 1561) was a Genevan Libertine and one of the most powerful figures in Geneva in the 16th century as chief opponent of religious reformer John Calvin's rule of the city.

Libertine

libertinismLibertineslibertinage
Around 1546, the uncoordinated forces coalesced into an identifiable group whom he referred to as the libertines, but who preferred to be called either Spirituels or Patriots.
The word "Libertine" was originally coined by John Calvin to negatively describe opponents of his policies in Geneva, Switzerland.

University of Paris

SorbonneParisLa Sorbonne
Through their assistance, Calvin was able to attend the Collège de la Marche, Paris, where he learned Latin from one of its greatest teachers, Mathurin Cordier.
The Collège de Montaigu was founded by the Archbishop of Rouen in the 14th century, and reformed in the 15th century by the humanist Jan Standonck, when it attracted reformers from within the Roman Catholic Church (such as Erasmus and Ignatius of Loyola) and those who subsequently became Protestants (John Calvin and John Knox).

Idelette Calvin

Idelette de Bure
Instead, in August of that year, he married Idelette de Bure, a widow who had two children from her first marriage.
Idelette Stordeur de Bure Calvin (born 1500, died 1549) was the only wife of the French reformer John Calvin (Jean Cauvin).

University of Orléans

University of OrleansOrléansUniversité d'Orléans
In 1525 or 1526, Gérard withdrew his son from the Collège de Montaigu and enrolled him in the University of Orléans to study law.