John Carter of Mars

John CarterJohn Carter, Warlord of MarsCaptain CarterCarter, Johneponymous characterJackJohn Carter: The Gods of MarsJohn Carter: The World of Marsseries of novelsspace hero
John Carter of Mars is a fictional Virginian—a veteran of the American Civil War—transported to Mars and the initial protagonist of Edgar Rice Burroughs' Barsoom stories.wikipedia
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Edgar Rice Burroughs

BurroughsEdgar Rice BurroughE.R. Burroughs
John Carter of Mars is a fictional Virginian—a veteran of the American Civil War—transported to Mars and the initial protagonist of Edgar Rice Burroughs' Barsoom stories.
Among the most notable of his creations are the jungle hero Tarzan, the heroic Mars adventurer John Carter and the fictional landmass within Earth known as Pellucidar.

John Carter (film)

John CarterJohn Carter of MarsCarter
The 2012 feature film John Carter marked the 100th anniversary of the character's first appearance.
The film chronicles the first interplanetary adventure of John Carter and his attempts to mediate civil unrest amongst the warring kingdoms of Barsoom.

Barsoom

Barsoom'' seriesMarsMars series
John Carter of Mars is a fictional Virginian—a veteran of the American Civil War—transported to Mars and the initial protagonist of Edgar Rice Burroughs' Barsoom stories.
The Barsoom series, where John Carter in the late 19th century is mysteriously transported from Earth to a Mars suffering from dwindling resources, has been cited by many well known science fiction writers as having inspired and motivated them in their youth, as well as by key scientists involved in both space exploration and the search for extraterrestrial life.

A Princess of Mars

Under the Moons of Mars
Written between July and September 28, 1911, the novel was serialized as Under the Moons of Mars in the pulp magazine The All-Story from February to July 1912.
John Carter, a Confederate veteran of the American Civil War, goes prospecting in Arizona immediately after the war's end.

Thuvia, Maid of Mars

John Carter is also a major secondary character in the fourth volume (Thuvia, Maid of Mars, 1920), and the ninth (Synthetic Men of Mars, 1940).
The principal characters are Carthoris (the son of John Carter of Mars) and Thuvia of Ptarth, each of whom appeared in the previous two novels.

The Gods of Mars

previous book
Carter reappeared in subsequent volumes of the series, most prominently in the second (The Gods of Mars, 1918), the third (The Warlord of Mars, 1919), the eighth (Swords of Mars, 1936), the tenth (Llana of Gathol, 1948), and the eleventh and final installment (John Carter of Mars, published posthumously in 1964).
At the end of the first book, A Princess of Mars, John Carter is unwillingly transported back to Earth.

The Warlord of Mars

Warlord of Mars
Carter reappeared in subsequent volumes of the series, most prominently in the second (The Gods of Mars, 1918), the third (The Warlord of Mars, 1919), the eighth (Swords of Mars, 1936), the tenth (Llana of Gathol, 1948), and the eleventh and final installment (John Carter of Mars, published posthumously in 1964).
At the end of the previous book, John Carter's wife, the princess Dejah Thoris, is imprisoned in the Temple of the Sun by the vile pretender goddess Issus.

Dejah Thoris

Deja ThorisDejah Thoris Vol. 2scantily clad warrior princess
He wins the hand of a Martian princess, Dejah Thoris of Helium, but after several years of marriage he sacrifices himself to save Barsoom from the loss of its atmosphere.
She is the love interest and later the wife of John Carter, an Earthman mystically transported to Mars, and subsequently the mother of their son Carthoris and daughter Tara.

Swords of Mars

Carter reappeared in subsequent volumes of the series, most prominently in the second (The Gods of Mars, 1918), the third (The Warlord of Mars, 1919), the eighth (Swords of Mars, 1936), the tenth (Llana of Gathol, 1948), and the eleventh and final installment (John Carter of Mars, published posthumously in 1964).
In this novel John Carter, transplanted Earthman, returns to his status of protagonist and first-person narrator for the first time since the third Martian novel, The Warlord of Mars.

The Chessmen of Mars

Chessmen of Mars
Tara is the heroine of The Chessmen of Mars (1922), and the mother of Carter's granddaughter Llana, heroine of Llana of Gathol.
In this novel Burroughs focuses on a younger member of the family established by John Carter and Dejah Thoris, protagonists of the first three books in the series.

Buck Rogers

Buck Rogers: Planet of ZoomBuck Rogers in the 25th CenturyWilliam "Buck" Rogers
In 1933, King Features Syndicate, wanting a science fiction strip to compete with the popular Buck Rogers, discussed a John Carter adaptation with Burroughs.
The most famous of these imitators was Flash Gordon (King Features Syndicate, 1934-2003); others included Tom Swift (1930-1937), Brick Bradford (Central Press Association, 1933-1987), Don Dixon and the Hidden Empire (Watkins Syndicate, 1935-1941), Speed Spaulding (John F. Dille Co., 1940-1941), and John Carter of Mars (United Feature Syndicate, 1941-1943).

Argosy (magazine)

ArgosyAll-Story WeeklyArgosy All-Story Weekly
Written between July and September 28, 1911, the novel was serialized as Under the Moons of Mars in the pulp magazine The All-Story from February to July 1912.
Edgar Rice Burroughs published some of his Tarzan and John Carter of Mars stories in the magazine; other science fiction writers included Ralph Milne Farley, Ray Cummings, Otis Adelbert Kline and A. Merritt.

Flash Gordon

comic strip of the same nameAnnihilantsFlash
However, Burroughs and King Features were unable to reach an agreement, and the syndicate decided to use an original strip — Flash Gordon by Alex Raymond — instead.
At first King Features tried to purchase the rights to the John Carter of Mars stories by Edgar Rice Burroughs.

Synthetic Men of Mars

John Carter is also a major secondary character in the fourth volume (Thuvia, Maid of Mars, 1920), and the ninth (Synthetic Men of Mars, 1940).
Like several previous novels in the Barsoom series, Synthetic Men introduces a completely new character as its protagonist: Vor Daj, a padwar (warrior) from Helium and a member of John Carter's personal guard.

Tarzan in comics

TarzancomicTarzan Family
In 1932, Burroughs tried to convince United Feature Syndicate, the distributors of the Tarzan comic strip, to also make an adaptation of John Carter; however the syndicate rejected the idea. Carter has appeared in various subsequent graphic adaptations of the Martian stories, notably the "John Carter of Mars" feature that ran in DC Comics' Tarzan and Weird Worlds comics from 1972 to 1973, and in Marvel Comics' John Carter, Warlord of Mars from 1977 to 1979.
Writer Don Kraar, who wrote the strip from 1983 to 1995, included in his stories characters from other books by Edgar Rice Burroughs, including David Innes of Pellucidar and John Carter of Mars.

Big Little Book series

Big Little BooksBig Little BookBetter Little Book
John Carter has appeared many times in short-lived comic strips and comic books, as well as in various Big Little Books of the 1930s and 1940s.
Stories were often related to radio programs (The Shadow), comic strips (The Gumps), children's books (Uncle Wiggily), novels (John Carter of Mars) and movies (Bambi).

John Carter, Warlord of Mars

John CarterWarlord of MarsWarlord of Mars Attacks
Carter has appeared in various subsequent graphic adaptations of the Martian stories, notably the "John Carter of Mars" feature that ran in DC Comics' Tarzan and Weird Worlds comics from 1972 to 1973, and in Marvel Comics' John Carter, Warlord of Mars from 1977 to 1979.
Created by Marv Wolfman (writer) and Gil Kane (penciller), it was based on the Barsoom series of Edgar Rice Burroughs and featured the eponymous character.

Ulysses Paxton

Only one other Earthman, Ulysses Paxton is able to travel to Mars via the method Carter used.
Within the narrative framework of the novel, Captain Paxton, United States Army Infantry, is a fan of Burroughs' Barsoom series, and after having a shell blow off his legs during trench warfare in World War I, he finds himself drawn across the gulfs of space to Mars (where his body is whole again) like John Carter before him.

Dynamite Entertainment

DynamiteDynamite ComicsDynamic Forces
In 2010, Dynamite Entertainment published an ongoing series titled Warlord of Mars, written by Arvid Nelson.
These include licensed adaptations of film properties such as Army of Darkness, Terminator and RoboCop, and licensed or public domain literary properties such as Zorro, Dracula, Sherlock Holmes, Alice in Wonderland, Red Sonja, Tarzan (as Lord of the Jungle) and John Carter of Mars (as Warlord of Mars).

Tarzan

Tarzan of the ApesTarzan-liketitle character
It later appeared as a complete novel only after the success of Burroughs' Tarzan series.
Jerry Siegel named Tarzan and another Burroughs character, John Carter, as early inspiration for his creation of Superman.

Allan and the Sundered Veil

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The first is in the story Allan and the Sundered Veil, which appears in the end of volume one.
Quatermain takes the drug and enters into a dream-world, encountering the equally lost John Carter (from Edgar Rice Burroughs' Barsoom novels) and his grandnephew, Randolph Carter (from H. P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos).

Weird Worlds (comics)

Weird WorldsWeird Worlds'' (comics)
Carter has appeared in various subsequent graphic adaptations of the Martian stories, notably the "John Carter of Mars" feature that ran in DC Comics' Tarzan and Weird Worlds comics from 1972 to 1973, and in Marvel Comics' John Carter, Warlord of Mars from 1977 to 1979.
This included the "John Carter of Mars" feature, by scripter Marv Wolfman and artist Murphy Anderson, which moved from Tarzan #209, and the "Pellucidar" feature from Korak, Son of Tarzan #46 drawn by Alan Weiss, Michael Kaluta, and Dan Green.

The Number of the Beast (novel)

The Number of the BeastNumber of the BeastThe Number of the Beast'' (novel)
In addition, one of the protagonists of Robert A. Heinlein's The Number of the Beast is Captain Zebediah John Carter, whose lover becomes his wife Dejah Thoris "Deety" Burroughs Carter.
The names "Dejah Thoris", "Burroughs", and "Carter" are overt references to John Carter and Dejah Thoris, the protagonists of the Barsoom novels of Edgar Rice Burroughs.

United Feature Syndicate

United Features SyndicateUnited FeaturesUnited Feature
In 1932, Burroughs tried to convince United Feature Syndicate, the distributors of the Tarzan comic strip, to also make an adaptation of John Carter; however the syndicate rejected the idea.

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Volume II

Volume IIsecond volumeVolume Two
Carter also appears in the beginning of volume two, helping the Barsoomians fight against the Martians from The War of the Worlds.
On the planet Mars, John Carter and Gullivar Jones have assembled an alliance of Martian races to combat an invading race of non-Martian aliens called "Molluscs" (the aliens from H.G. Wells' The War of the Worlds).