John E. Mack

John MackMack
Professor John Edward Mack M.D.wikipedia
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Alien abduction

abductedabducted by aliensalien abductions
He was also known as a leading researcher on the psychology of teenage suicide and drug addiction, and he later became a researcher in the psychology of alien abduction experiences.
As reported in the Harvard University Gazette in 1992, Dr. John E. Mack reports that of the 60 cases of claimed abductees he had worked on, that after a battery of psychological tests, "no psychiatric or psychosocial explanation for these reports is evident. These people are not mentally ill. He has spent countless therapeutic hours with these individuals only to find that what struck him was the 'ordinariness' of the population, including a restaurant owner, several secretaries, a prison guard, college students, a university administrator, and several homemakers … 'The majority of abductees do not appear to be deluded, confabulating, lying, self-dramatizing, or suffering from a clear mental illness,' he maintained."

T. E. Lawrence

Lawrence of ArabiaT.E. LawrenceT E Lawrence
In 1976, Mack won the Pulitzer Prize for his book A Prince of Our Disorder on T.E. Lawrence. He addressed this issue of "world view" on the individual level in his early clinical explorations of dreams, nightmares and teen suicide, and in A Prince of Our Disorder, his biographical study of the life of British officer T. E. Lawrence, for which he received the Pulitzer Prize for Biography in 1977.
Malcolm Brown, John E. Mack, and Jeremy Wilson have argued that this episode had strong psychological effects on Lawrence, which may explain some of his unconventional behaviour in later life.

Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography

Biography or AutobiographyPulitzer Prize for BiographyPulitzer Prize
He addressed this issue of "world view" on the individual level in his early clinical explorations of dreams, nightmares and teen suicide, and in A Prince of Our Disorder, his biographical study of the life of British officer T. E. Lawrence, for which he received the Pulitzer Prize for Biography in 1977.

Budd Hopkins

Bud Hopkins
His interest in the spiritual or transformational aspects of people's alien encounters, and his suggestion that the experience of alien contact itself may be more transcendent than physical in nature—yet nonetheless real—set him apart from many of his contemporaries, such as Budd Hopkins, who advocated the physical reality of aliens.
The 1992 made-for-television film Intruders featured fictionalized characters based on the works of Hopkins and psychiatrist John E. Mack, and, like Hopkins' book of the same name, portrayed abduction scenes.

David M. Jacobs

David Michael JacobsJacobs, David M. (Ph.D.)
He also wrote the foreword to Paths Beyond Ego: The Transpersonal Vision (1993), the introductions to The PK Man: A True Story of Mind Over Matter (2000) by Jeffrey Mishlove and Secret Life (1992) by David M. Jacobs, and he contributed chapters to several books including The Long Darkness: Psychological and Moral Perspectives on Nuclear Winter (1986), ''The Psychology of Terrorism Vol.
Jacobs' hypotheses have been criticized as unsupportably dire by those who take a more positive view of the alien abduction experience such as John E. Mack; Jacobs labels these critics as "positivists" in his writings.

Laurance Rockefeller

Laurance S. RockefellerLaurence RockefellerLaurance
(Mack was censured in the committee's report for what they believed were methodological errors, but Dean Tosteson took no action based on the committee's assessment.) He had received legal help from Roderick MacLeish and Daniel Sheehan (of the Pentagon Papers case), and the support of Laurance Rockefeller, who also funded Mack's non-profit organization for four consecutive years at $250,000 per year.
He funded the research of Harvard Medical School Professor Dr. John E. Mack, author of Passport to the Cosmos.

Arnold S. Relman

Arnold RelmanArnold "Bud" RelmanArnold "Budd" Relman, M.D.
The committee chairman was Arnold "Budd" Relman, M.D., a Professor of Medicine and of Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School who served as editor of The New England Journal of Medicine.
In May 1994, Arnold Relman chaired a committee at Harvard, to confidentially review John E. Mack's clinical investigation of the people who had shared their reported alien encounters with him.

Psychiatrist

psychiatristsclinical psychiatristconsultant psychiatrist
Professor John Edward Mack M.D. (October 4, 1929 – September 27, 2004) was an American psychiatrist, writer, and professor and the head of the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Harvard Medical School

Harvard University Medical SchoolHarvardHarvard School of Medicine
Professor John Edward Mack M.D. (October 4, 1929 – September 27, 2004) was an American psychiatrist, writer, and professor and the head of the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Mack graduated from the Horace Mann-Lincoln School in 1947 and Phi Beta Kappa from Oberlin in 1951, and received his medical doctorate degree cum laude from Harvard Medical School in 1955.

Pulitzer Prize

Pulitzer PrizesPulitzerPulitzer-Prize
In 1976, Mack won the Pulitzer Prize for his book A Prince of Our Disorder on T.E. Lawrence.

Developmental psychology

developmental psychologistchild psychologychild psychologist
As the head of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, Mack's clinical expertise was in child psychology, adolescent psychology, and the psychology of religion.

Adolescence

adolescentteenagerteenage
As the head of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, Mack's clinical expertise was in child psychology, adolescent psychology, and the psychology of religion.

Psychology of religion

pastoral psychologypsychology of belief and religionPsychology of religion and spirituality
As the head of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, Mack's clinical expertise was in child psychology, adolescent psychology, and the psychology of religion.

Youth suicide

teen suicideteenage suicidesuicide
He was also known as a leading researcher on the psychology of teenage suicide and drug addiction, and he later became a researcher in the psychology of alien abduction experiences.

Addiction

drug addictiondrug addictdrug addicts
He was also known as a leading researcher on the psychology of teenage suicide and drug addiction, and he later became a researcher in the psychology of alien abduction experiences.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Mack was born in New York City, to an academic, German Jewish family.

History of the Jews in Germany

German JewishGerman JewsGerman-Jewish
Mack was born in New York City, to an academic, German Jewish family.

City College of New York

City CollegeCollege of the City of New YorkCCNY
His father, the historian Edward Clarence Mack (1904-1973), was a professor at CUNY, while his mother Eleanor Liebmann Mack (1905-1930) died while John was an infant.

Dartmouth College

DartmouthDarmouth Dartmouth
After his mother died, his father remarried the economist Ruth P. Mack, through which he had a half-sister, Mary Lee Ingbar, a pioneer of computer analysis who became a professor at Dartmouth College and University of Massachusetts Medical School.

University of Massachusetts Medical School

UMass Medical SchoolUniversity of Massachusetts Medical CenterUniversity of Massachusetts, Worcester
After his mother died, his father remarried the economist Ruth P. Mack, through which he had a half-sister, Mary Lee Ingbar, a pioneer of computer analysis who became a professor at Dartmouth College and University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Horace Mann School

Horace MannHorace Mann High SchoolHorace Mann Academy
Mack graduated from the Horace Mann-Lincoln School in 1947 and Phi Beta Kappa from Oberlin in 1951, and received his medical doctorate degree cum laude from Harvard Medical School in 1955.

Phi Beta Kappa

Phi Beta Kappa SocietyPhi Beta Kappa Honor SocietyPhi Beta Kappa key
Mack graduated from the Horace Mann-Lincoln School in 1947 and Phi Beta Kappa from Oberlin in 1951, and received his medical doctorate degree cum laude from Harvard Medical School in 1955.

Oberlin College

OberlinOberlin Collegiate InstituteOberlin College and Conservatory
Mack graduated from the Horace Mann-Lincoln School in 1947 and Phi Beta Kappa from Oberlin in 1951, and received his medical doctorate degree cum laude from Harvard Medical School in 1955.

United States Air Force

U.S. Air ForceAir ForceUSAF
In 1959, Mack joined the US Air Force, serving as a medic in Japan, where he rose to the rank of captain.

Medic

medicsmedical personnelmedical corpsman
In 1959, Mack joined the US Air Force, serving as a medic in Japan, where he rose to the rank of captain.