John Ehrlichman

John D. EhrlichmanEhrlichman, John D.Erlichman
John Daniel Ehrlichman (March 20, 1925 – February 14, 1999) was counsel and Assistant to the President for Domestic Affairs under President Richard Nixon.wikipedia
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Watergate scandal

WatergateWatergate break-inWatergate burglaries
Ehrlichman was a key figure in events leading to the Watergate break-in and the ensuing Watergate scandal, for which he was convicted of conspiracy, obstruction of justice, and perjury and served a year and a half in prison.
On January 27, 1972, G. Gordon Liddy, Finance Counsel for the Committee for the Re-Election of the President (CRP) and former aide to John Ehrlichman, presented a campaign intelligence plan to CRP's Acting Chairman Jeb Stuart Magruder, Attorney General John Mitchell, and Presidential Counsel John Dean that involved extensive illegal activities against the Democratic Party.

Distinguished Flying Cross (United States)

Distinguished Flying CrossDistinguished Flying CrossesDFC
In World War II, Ehrlichman won the Distinguished Flying Cross as a lead B-17 navigator in the Eighth Air Force.

Christian Science

Christian ScientistChristian ScientistsChristian Science Church
His family practiced Christian Science (his father was a convert from Judaism).
The bill was supported by two of President Richard Nixon's aides, Christian Scientists H. R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman.

Richard Nixon

Richard M. NixonNixonPresident Nixon
John Daniel Ehrlichman (March 20, 1925 – February 14, 1999) was counsel and Assistant to the President for Domestic Affairs under President Richard Nixon.
He relied on his domestic advisor John Ehrlichman, who favored protection of natural resources, to keep him "out of trouble on environmental issues."

John Dean

John W. DeanDean, JohnDean
(John Dean would succeed him.) Ehrlichman was Counsel for about a year before becoming Chief Domestic Advisor for Nixon. White House Counsel John Dean cited the "Berlin Wall" of Ehrlichman and Haldeman as one of the reasons for his growing sense of alienation in the White House.
In July 1970, he accepted an appointment to serve as counsel to the president, after the previous holder of this post, John Ehrlichman, became the president's chief domestic adviser.

Henry Paulson

Hank PaulsonHenry M. PaulsonHenry M. Paulson, Jr.
Henry Paulson was John Ehrlichman's assistant in 1972 and 1973.
He then worked for the administration of U.S. President Richard Nixon, serving as assistant to John Ehrlichman from 1972 to 1973.

The Company (Ehrlichman novel)

The CompanyThe Company'' (Ehrlichman novel)
Ehrlichman wrote several novels, including The Company, which served as the basis for the 1977 television miniseries Washington: Behind Closed Doors.
The Company is a political fiction roman à clef novel written by John Ehrlichman, a former close aide to President Richard Nixon and a figure in the Watergate scandal, first published in 1976 by Simon & Schuster.

Egil Krogh

Egil "Bud" KroghEgil Krogh, Jr.
Ehrlichman created "The Plumbers", the group at the center of the Watergate scandal, and appointed his assistant Egil Krogh to oversee its covert operations, focusing on stopping leaks of confidential information after the release of the Pentagon Papers in 1971.
Krogh was employed by Hullin, Ehrlichman, Roberts and Hodge, the Seattle law firm of family friend John Ehrlichman, and joined Ehrlichman in the counsel's office of Nixon's 1968 presidential campaign.

Washington: Behind Closed Doors

Ehrlichman wrote several novels, including The Company, which served as the basis for the 1977 television miniseries Washington: Behind Closed Doors.
The fictional story is loosely based on John Ehrlichman's book The Company, a novel inspired by the author's tenure as a top aide in the Nixon administration.

H. R. Haldeman

H.R. HaldemanBob HaldemanH.R. "Bob" Haldeman
He and close friend H. R. Haldeman, whom he had met at UCLA, were referred to jointly as "The Berlin Wall" by White House staffers because of their German-sounding family names and their penchant for isolating Nixon from other advisors and anyone seeking an audience with him.
At UCLA, he met John Ehrlichman, who became a close friend and colleague in the Nixon administration.

White House Counsel

Deputy White House CounselCounsel to the PresidentSpecial Counsel
White House Counsel John Dean cited the "Berlin Wall" of Ehrlichman and Haldeman as one of the reasons for his growing sense of alienation in the White House.

Operation Sandwedge

The proposals were put together by H. R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman and Jack Caulfield in 1971.

University of California, Los Angeles

UCLAUniversity of California at Los AngelesUniversity of California Los Angeles
Taking advantage of the G.I. Bill, Ehrlichman attended the University of California, Los Angeles, graduating in 1948 with a B.A. in political science.
H. R. Haldeman ('48) and John Ehrlichman ('48) are among the most infamous alumni because of their activities during the 1972 Watergate Scandal.

Nixon (film)

NixonJack Jones (banker)Nixon'' (film)
John Ehrlichman was portrayed by J. T. Walsh in the film Nixon, and by Wayne Péré in Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House.
The first begins on June 23, 1972 about one week after the break-in, during a meeting with H. R. Haldeman (James Woods), John Ehrlichman (J. T. Walsh) and Dean (David Hyde Pierce).

L. Patrick Gray

L. Patrick Gray IIIGrayPat Gray
After the start of the Watergate investigations in 1973, Ehrlichman lobbied for an intentional delay in the confirmation of L. Patrick Gray as Director of the FBI.
The Nixon administration was so angered by this statement that John Ehrlichman told John Dean that Gray should be left to "twist slowly, slowly in the wind."

White House Plumbers

PlumbersThe Plumbersfive men
Ehrlichman created "The Plumbers", the group at the center of the Watergate scandal, and appointed his assistant Egil Krogh to oversee its covert operations, focusing on stopping leaks of confidential information after the release of the Pentagon Papers in 1971.
In a September 1971 conversation, John Ehrlichman advised Nixon, "We had one little operation; it's been aborted out in Los Angeles which, I think, is better that you don't know about."

Limited hangout

Modified limited hangoutan elaborate hoaxLimited hang out
In a March 22, 1973 meeting between president Richard Nixon, John Dean, John Ehrlichman, John Mitchell, and H. R. Haldeman, Ehrlichman incorporated the term into a new and related one, "modified limited hangout".

Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Pat MoynihanDaniel MoynihanDaniel P. Moynihan
Accordingly, operational oversight of the Urban Affairs Council was given to Moynihan's nominal successor as Domestic Policy Assistant, former White House Counsel John Ehrlichman.

Charles Colson

Chuck ColsonCharles W. ColsonCharles "Chuck" Colson
Colson and John Ehrlichman had recruited E. Howard Hunt as a $100-a-day ($753-a-day in 2019 dollars) White House consultant.

J. T. Walsh

J.T. Walsh
John Ehrlichman was portrayed by J. T. Walsh in the film Nixon, and by Wayne Péré in Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House.

Conspiracy (criminal)

conspiracycriminal conspiracyconspiring
Ehrlichman was a key figure in events leading to the Watergate break-in and the ensuing Watergate scandal, for which he was convicted of conspiracy, obstruction of justice, and perjury and served a year and a half in prison.

Obstruction of justice

obstructing justiceobstructionobstruct justice
Ehrlichman was a key figure in events leading to the Watergate break-in and the ensuing Watergate scandal, for which he was convicted of conspiracy, obstruction of justice, and perjury and served a year and a half in prison.

Perjury

perjuredfalse testimonyperjurer
Ehrlichman was a key figure in events leading to the Watergate break-in and the ensuing Watergate scandal, for which he was convicted of conspiracy, obstruction of justice, and perjury and served a year and a half in prison.