John Flamsteed

FlamsteedHistoria Coelestis BritannicaFlamsteed, JohnSir John Flamsteed
John Flamsteed FRS (19 August 1646 – 31 December 1719) was an English astronomer and the first Astronomer Royal.wikipedia
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Uranus

Uranian34 TauriMagnetosphere of Uranus
He also made the first recorded observations of Uranus, although he mistakenly catalogued it as a star, and he laid the foundation stone for the Royal Greenwich Observatory. He was responsible for several of the earliest recorded sightings of the planet Uranus, which he mistook for a star and catalogued as '34 Tauri'.
The earliest definite sighting was in 1690, when John Flamsteed observed it at least six times, cataloguing it as 34 Tauri.

Royal Observatory, Greenwich

Royal Greenwich ObservatoryRoyal ObservatoryGreenwich Observatory
He also made the first recorded observations of Uranus, although he mistakenly catalogued it as a star, and he laid the foundation stone for the Royal Greenwich Observatory.
He appointed John Flamsteed as the first Astronomer Royal.

Astronomer Royal

Astronomer-RoyalAstronomers Royalastronomer
John Flamsteed FRS (19 August 1646 – 31 December 1719) was an English astronomer and the first Astronomer Royal.
He appointed John Flamsteed, instructing him "forthwith to apply himself withthe most exact care and diligence to the rectifying the tables of the motions of the heavens, and the places of the fixed stars, so as to find out the so-much desired longitude of places, for the perfecting the art of navigation [sic]."

Denby

Denby CommonDenby Common and Codnor Breach
Flamsteed was born in Denby, Derbyshire, England, the only son of Stephen Flamsteed and his first wife, Mary Spadman.
Denby is a village in the English county of Derbyshire that is notable as the birthplace of John Flamsteed, England's first Astronomer Royal, and the location of the Denby Pottery Company.

Derby School

DerbyDerby Grammar School
He was educated at the free school of Derby and at Derby School, in St Peter's Churchyard, Derby, near where his father carried on a malting business.
While the astronomer John Flamsteed was at the Free Grammar School in the 1660s, parents were expected to provide boys with books, quill-pens, and wax candles to use when daylight failed.

Astronomy

astronomicalastronomerastronomers
During those years, Flamsteed gave his father some help in his business, and from his father learnt arithmetic and the use of fractions, developing a keen interest in mathematics and astronomy.
The English astronomer John Flamsteed catalogued over 3000 stars, More extensive star catalogues were produced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille.

Jesus College, Cambridge

Jesus CollegeJesusJesus College, Cambridge University
His progress to Jesus College, Cambridge, recommended by the Master of Derby School, was delayed by some years of chronic ill health.

Thomas Street

Thomas Streete
At about the same time, he acquired Thomas Street's Astronomia Carolina, or A New Theory of the Celestial Motions (Caroline Tables).
Astronomia Carolina was widely read, and used by students who later became very notable in their own right, e.g. Isaac Newton and John Flamsteed.

Derby

Derby, EnglandCity of DerbyDerby, Derbyshire
He was educated at the free school of Derby and at Derby School, in St Peter's Churchyard, Derby, near where his father carried on a malting business.

Isaac Newton

NewtonSir Isaac NewtonNewtonian
Flamsteed was greatly impressed (as Isaac Newton had been) by the work of Horrocks.
Newton's reawakening interest in astronomical matters received further stimulus by the appearance of a comet in the winter of 1680–1681, on which he corresponded with John Flamsteed.

Edmond Halley

Edmund HalleyHalleySir Edmund Halley
Flamsteed later learned that Newton had gained access to his observations and data through Edmund Halley, his former assistant with whom he previously had a cordial relationship.
He was the second Astronomer Royal in Britain, succeeding John Flamsteed in 1720.

Louise de Kérouaille, Duchess of Portsmouth

Duchess of PortsmouthLouise de KérouailleLouise de Kéroualle
These plans were, however, preempted when Charles II was persuaded by his mistress, Louise de Kérouaille, Duchess of Portsmouth, to hear about a proposal to find longitude by the position of the Moon from an individual known as Le Sieur de St Pierre.
While the Frenchman's proposal was ineffective, it led Charles to establish the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, and appoint John Flamsteed as Astronomer Royal.

Cassiopeia A

Cas ACassieopeia A supernova remnant
Three hundred years later, the American astronomical historian William Ashworth suggested that what Flamsteed may have seen was the most recent supernova in the galaxy's history, an event which would leave as its remnant the strongest radio source outside of the Solar System, known in the third Cambridge (3C) catalogue as 3C 461 and commonly called Cassiopeia A by astronomers.
Since Cas A is circumpolar for mid-Northern latitudes, this is probably due to interstellar dust absorbing optical wavelength radiation before it reached Earth (although it is possible that it was recorded as a sixth magnitude star 3 Cassiopeiae by John Flamsteed on 16 August 1680 ).

Atlas Coelestis

1729
In 1729 his wife published his Atlas Coelestis, assisted by Joseph Crosthwait and Abraham Sharp, who were responsible for the technical side.
The Atlas Coelestis is a star atlas published posthumously in 1729, based on observations made by the First Astronomer Royal, John Flamsteed.

Flamsteed designation

designationFlamsteedcatalogue of stars
It was considered the first significant contribution of the Greenwich Observatory, and the numerical Flamsteed designations for stars that were added subsequently to a French edition are still in use.
They are named for John Flamsteed who first used them while compiling his Historia Coelestis Britannica.

Joseph Crosthwait

In 1729 his wife published his Atlas Coelestis, assisted by Joseph Crosthwait and Abraham Sharp, who were responsible for the technical side.
Joseph Crosthwait was chief assistant to John Flamsteed, the first Astronomer Royal.

Burstow

SmallfieldBurstow HallBurstow, Surrey
In February 1676, he was admitted a Fellow of the Royal Society, and in July, he moved into the Observatory where he lived until 1684, when he was "[e]levated to the priesthood [and] appointed rector" of the small village of Burstow, near Crawley in Surrey.
John Flamsteed, astronomer and cleric was rector of Burstow from 1684 until his death in 1719, was appointed in 1675 by Charles II to be the first Astronomer Royal.

Jonas Moore

Sir Jonas MooreJonas Moore IMoore, Jonas
Ordained a deacon, he was preparing to take up a living in Derbyshire when he was invited to London by his patron Jonas Moore, Surveyor-General of the Ordnance.
When Charles II appointed John Flamsteed his "astronomical observator" on 4 March 1675, Flamsteed had already enjoyed Moore's patronage since 1670, when Moore presented him with a Towneley micrometer.

Star

starsstellarmassive star
He was responsible for several of the earliest recorded sightings of the planet Uranus, which he mistook for a star and catalogued as '34 Tauri'.
Later a numbering system based on the star's right ascension was invented and added to John Flamsteed's star catalogue in his book "Historia coelestis Britannica" (the 1712 edition), whereby this numbering system came to be called Flamsteed designation or Flamsteed numbering.

Cassiopeia (constellation)

CassiopeiaCassiopeia constellationCassiopea
On 16 August 1680 Flamsteed catalogued a star, 3 Cassiopeiae, that later astronomers were unable to corroborate.
Upsilon was later found to be two stars and labelled Upsilon 1 and Upsilon 2 by John Flamsteed.

Abraham Sharp

Sharp, Abraham
"If Sir I.N. would be sensible of it, I have done both him and Dr. Halley a great kindness," he wrote to his assistant Abraham Sharp.
His wide knowledge of mathematics and astronomy attracted Flamsteed's attention and it was through Flamsteed that Sharp was invited, in 1688, to enter the Greenwich Royal Observatory.

Flamsteed (crater)

Flamsteed
Flamsteed is a small lunar impact crater located on the Oceanus Procellarum, which is named after British astronomer John Flamsteed.

Margaret Flamsteed

Margaret
She was married to John Flamsteed, the Astronomical Observer (a post that later became known as Astronomer Royal).

Stephen Gray (scientist)

Stephen GrayGrayGray, Stephen
Some of Gray's output came to the notice of John Flamsteed, a relative of some Kent friends of Gray and the first English Astronomer Royal, who was building the new Royal Greenwich Observatory.

Great Comet of 1680

comet of 1680C/1680 V1bright comet
In 1681 Flamsteed proposed that the two great comets observed in November and December 1680 were not separate bodies, but rather a single comet travelling first towards the Sun and then away from it.
This is ironic considering John Flamsteed was the first to propose that the two bright comets of 1680–1681 were the same comet, one travelling inbound to the Sun and the other outbound, and Newton originally disputed this.