John Hancock

Governor HancockHancockJohn Hancock IIILiberty Riotfirst signerHancock, JohnJ. HancockJohnProtest
John Hancock ( – October 8, 1793) was an American merchant, statesman, and prominent Patriot of the American Revolution.wikipedia
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Patriot (American Revolution)

PatriotPatriotsWhig
John Hancock ( – October 8, 1793) was an American merchant, statesman, and prominent Patriot of the American Revolution.
They included lawyers such as John Adams, students such as Alexander Hamilton, planters such as Thomas Jefferson and George Mason, merchants such as Alexander McDougall and John Hancock, and farmers such as Daniel Shays and Joseph Plumb Martin.

HMS Liberty (1768)

LibertyHMS ''LibertyHMS Liberty
He became very popular in Massachusetts, especially after British officials seized his sloop Liberty in 1768 and charged him with smuggling. On the evening of May 9, 1768, Hancock's sloop Liberty arrived in Boston Harbor, carrying a shipment of Madeira wine.
Liberty was a sloop owned by John Hancock, an American merchant.

Quincy, Massachusetts

QuincyQuincy, MAMount Wollaston
John Hancock was born on January 23, 1737 in Braintree, Massachusetts, in a part of town that eventually became the separate city of Quincy.
Known as the "City of Presidents," Quincy is the birthplace of two U.S. presidents—John Adams and his son John Quincy Adams—as well as John Hancock, a President of the Continental Congress and the first signer of the Declaration of Independence, as well as being the 1st and 3rd Governor of Massachusetts.

Governor of Massachusetts

GovernorMassachusetts GovernorMassachusetts
He served as president of the Second Continental Congress and was the first and third Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
John Hancock was elected as the first governor of the independent commonwealth on October 25th, 1780.

Second Continental Congress

Continental CongressCongressSecond
He served as president of the Second Continental Congress and was the first and third Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. On December 1, 1774, the Provincial Congress elected Hancock as a delegate to the Second Continental Congress to replace James Bowdoin, who had been unable to attend the first Congress because of illness.
Notable new arrivals included Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania and John Hancock of Massachusetts.

Massachusetts

MACommonwealth of MassachusettsMass.
He became very popular in Massachusetts, especially after British officials seized his sloop Liberty in 1768 and charged him with smuggling. He served as president of the Second Continental Congress and was the first and third Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
Anti-Parliamentary activity by men such as Samuel Adams and John Hancock, followed by reprisals by the British government, were a primary reason for the unity of the Thirteen Colonies and the outbreak of the American Revolution in 1775.

American Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary WarRevolutionary
John Hancock ( – October 8, 1793) was an American merchant, statesman, and prominent Patriot of the American Revolution.
Meanwhile, a riot broke out in Boston in June 1768 over the seizure of the sloop Liberty, owned by John Hancock, for alleged smuggling.

Braintree, Massachusetts

BraintreeSouth Braintree, MassachusettsSouth Braintree
John Hancock was born on January 23, 1737 in Braintree, Massachusetts, in a part of town that eventually became the separate city of Quincy.
The town of Braintree was the birthplace of presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams, as well as statesman John Hancock.

Hancock Manor

Hancock Mansion
He and Lydia, along with several servants and slaves, lived in Hancock Manor on Beacon Hill.
She died childless, leaving it to her favorite nephew John.

United States Declaration of Independence

Declaration of IndependenceAmerican Declaration of IndependenceU.S. Declaration of Independence
He is remembered for his large and stylish signature on the United States Declaration of Independence, so much so that the term "John Hancock" has become a synonym in the United States for one's signature.
The Declaration was transposed on paper, adopted by the Continental Congress, and signed by John Hancock, President of the Congress, on July 4, 1776, according to the 1911 record of events by the U.S. State Department under Secretary Philander C. Knox.

John Hancock Jr.

Col. John Hancock Jr.John HancockRev. Col. John Hancock Jr.
He was the son of Col. John Hancock Jr. of Braintree and Mary Hawke Thaxter (widow of Samuel Thaxter Junior), who was from nearby Hingham.
Rev. Col. John Hancock Jr. (June 1, 1702 – May 7, 1744) was a colonial American clergyman, soldier, planter, politician, and father of politician John Hancock III.

Samuel Adams

Sam AdamsSamuelAdams
He began his political career in Boston as a protégé of Samuel Adams, an influential local politician, though the two men later became estranged.
Joining Adams in the House was John Hancock, a new representative from Boston.

Boston Board of Selectmen

selectmanBoston's Board of SelectmenSelectman of Boston
In March 1765, he was elected as one of Boston's five selectmen, an office previously held by his uncle for many years.
At the time of the American Revolution, the selectmen were John Hancock, Joseph Jackson, Samuel Sewall, William Phillips, Timothy Newell, John Ruddock, John Rowe and Samuel Pemberton.

List of colonial governors of Massachusetts

Governor of the Province of Massachusetts BayGovernor of the Massachusetts Bay Colonygovernor
Thomas Hancock had close relations with the royal governors of Massachusetts and secured profitable government contracts during the war.
By then, the province was already being run de facto by the Massachusetts Provincial Congress; following the adoption of a state constitution in 1779, the newly formed Commonwealth of Massachusetts elected John Hancock as its first governor.

HMS Romney (1762)

HMS ''RomneyRomneyPercy Fraser
One month later, while the British warship HMS Romney was in port, one of the tidesmen changed his story: he now claimed that he had been forcibly held on the Liberty while it had been illegally unloaded.
Her actions involved impressing local sailors, confiscating a vessel belonging to John Hancock and providing a refuge for the unpopular commissioners when rioting broke out.

President of the Continental Congress

PresidentPresident of CongressPresident of the Confederation Congress
He served as president of the Second Continental Congress and was the first and third Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
John Hancock was elected to fill the vacancy, but his position was somewhat ambiguous, because it was not clear if Randolph had resigned or was on a leave of absence.

Samuel Thaxter

He was the son of Col. John Hancock Jr. of Braintree and Mary Hawke Thaxter (widow of Samuel Thaxter Junior), who was from nearby Hingham.
His son Samuel Thaxter Junior (1695-1732) married Mary Hawke (1711-1798) who was the mother of John Hancock (Signer of the Declaration of Independence).

Madeira wine

MadeiraMadeira sauceEast India Madeira
On the evening of May 9, 1768, Hancock's sloop Liberty arrived in Boston Harbor, carrying a shipment of Madeira wine.
One of the major events on the road to the American revolution in which Madeira played a key role was the British seizure of John Hancock's sloop the Liberty on May 9, 1768.

Massachusetts Provincial Congress

Provincial CongressMassachusettsProvincial Congress of Massachusetts
In response, the House resolved itself into the Massachusetts Provincial Congress, a body independent of British control.
With John Hancock as its president, this extralegal body became the de facto government of Massachusetts outside of Boston.

Joseph Warren

Dr. Joseph WarrenWarrenGeneral Warren
The speech, probably written by Hancock in collaboration with Adams, Joseph Warren, and others, was published and widely reprinted, enhancing Hancock's stature as a leading Patriot.
Warren enlisted Paul Revere and William Dawes on April 18, 1775, to leave Boston and spread the alarm that the British garrison in Boston was setting out to raid the town of Concord and arrest rebel leaders John Hancock and Samuel Adams.

First Corps of Cadets (Massachusetts)

First Corps of CadetsBoston CadetsIndependent Corps of Cadets
In April 1772, Hutchinson approved Hancock's election as colonel of the Boston Cadets, a militia unit whose primary function was to provide a ceremonial escort for the governor and the General Court.
In 1766, John Hancock, the Cadet's most famous alumnus, joined.

James Bowdoin

Governor James BowdoinJames Bowdoin IIJames Bowdoin scholar
On December 1, 1774, the Provincial Congress elected Hancock as a delegate to the Second Continental Congress to replace James Bowdoin, who had been unable to attend the first Congress because of illness.
He was elected president of the constitutional convention that drafted the state's constitution in 1779, and ran unsuccessfully for governor in 1780, losing to John Hancock.

Boston Massacre

Patrick CarrBoston "massacreBoston Massacre trial
The British troops remained, however, and tensions between soldiers and civilians eventually resulted in the killing of five civilians in the Boston Massacre of March 1770.
On June 10, 1768, customs officials seized Liberty, a sloop owned by leading Boston merchant John Hancock, on allegations that the ship had been involved in smuggling.

Beacon Hill, Boston

Beacon HillBeacon Hill Historic DistrictBeacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts
He and Lydia, along with several servants and slaves, lived in Hancock Manor on Beacon Hill.

Hancock–Clarke House

Hancock-Clarke HouseHancock's childhood homethe home
They stayed instead at Hancock's childhood home in Lexington.
Built in 1738, the house is notable as the only surviving house associated with statesman John Hancock, who lived here for several years as a child.