John Hare (actor)

John HareSir John HareHareJ HareJohn Hare’s
Sir John Hare (16 May 1844 – 28 December 1921), born John Joseph Fairs, was an English actor and theatre manager of the later 19th– and early 20th centuries.wikipedia
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St James's Theatre

St. James's TheatreSt JamesSt. James' Theatre
He was in partnership with the actor W. H. Kendal at the Court Theatre from 1875 to 1879, and from 1879 to 1888 at the St James's Theatre with Kendal and the latter's wife, Madge.
It was not until 1879–1888, under the management of the actors John Hare and Madge and W. H. Kendal that the theatre began to prosper.

Royal Court Theatre

Royal CourtCourt TheatreEnglish Stage Company
He was in partnership with the actor W. H. Kendal at the Court Theatre from 1875 to 1879, and from 1879 to 1888 at the St James's Theatre with Kendal and the latter's wife, Madge.
By 1878, management of the theatre was shared by John Hare and W. H. Kendal.

William Hunter Kendal

W. H. KendalKendalsWilliam
He was in partnership with the actor W. H. Kendal at the Court Theatre from 1875 to 1879, and from 1879 to 1888 at the St James's Theatre with Kendal and the latter's wife, Madge.
In the 1880s, they starred at and jointly managed (with John Hare) the St. James's Theatre.

Madge Kendal

Madge Robertson KendalMrs. KendalMadge
He was in partnership with the actor W. H. Kendal at the Court Theatre from 1875 to 1879, and from 1879 to 1888 at the St James's Theatre with Kendal and the latter's wife, Madge.
After a series of generally successful appearances in London and on tour in Britain, the Kendals joined the actor John Hare in running the St James's Theatre between 1879 and 1888, transforming the fortunes of their theatre, previously known for financial failure.

Garrick Theatre

GarrickThe Garrick Theatre
At the Garrick Theatre from 1888 to 1895 Hare had a solo managerial career, after which he concentrated on acting – in the US, on tour in the British provinces, and in the West End.
The theatre's first manager was Gilbert's friend John Hare.

Arthur Wing Pinero

PineroA. W. PineroArthur Pinero
Among the playwrights with whom Hare was closely associated were T. W. Robertson, W. S. Gilbert and Arthur Wing Pinero.
Pinero's play was regarded as daringly unconventional and a risky venture, but it caught on with the public, particularly for the character Baron Croodle, a "disreputable but delightful old reprobate and card-shark" played by John Hare.

Lionel Brough

LionelBroughSydney Brough
Among the company were J. L. Toole (a guest star), Squire Bancroft, Lionel Brough and William Blakeley, with all of whom Hare was quickly on friendly terms.
The company there included Squire Bancroft and John Hare.

Giggleswick School

Giggleswick Grammar SchoolGiggleswick GrammarOld Giggleswickian
After his parents died Hare was sent by his uncle, his legal guardian, to Giggleswick School, and he was studying for the civil service examination when he was invited to take part in some amateur theatricals.

Effie Bancroft

Marie WiltonBancroftEffie
After acting as an amateur as a young man he joined a professional company in Liverpool, before making his London debut in 1865 at the age of 21 with Marie Wilton's company. As a newly-married man Hare seriously considered leaving the stage in favour of more secure employment in the civil service; nevertheless he wrote to the actress and manager Marie Wilton, seeking to join a new company that she was setting up at the old Prince of Wales's Theatre in London.
Mr. and Mrs. Bancroft likewise presented at their theatre a number of prominent actors, among them Hare, Coghlan, the Kendals, and Ellen Terry.

Box and Cox (farce)

Box and Cox
After playing in two further amateur productions – as Beauseant in a burlesque on The Lady of Lyons, and Box in Box and Cox – he determined to go on the stage.
Box and Cox was revived at the Prince of Wales's Theatre, London, in 1867 with G. Honey as Box, John Hare as Cox, and Mrs Leigh Murray as Mrs Bouncer; and again at the Haymarket Theatre in 1889, with H. Nicholls as Cox, E. M. Robson as Box, and Mrs E. Phelps as Mrs Bouncer.

Sweethearts (play)

SweetheartsSweethearts'' (play)
Hare left the company in October 1874, when he was unable to master a leading role written for him in Sweethearts by W. S. Gilbert.
Gilbert wanted his friend John Hare to play the male lead, to take advantage of Hare's naturally boyish appearance and of his talent for impersonating elderly men, contrasting the character in youth in the first act and old age in the second.

Money (play)

MoneyMoney'' (play)
P., Robertson, 1870), Sir John Vesey (Money, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, 1872), and Sir Patrick Lundie (adaptation of Man and Wife'', Wilkie Collins, 1873).
The cast included George Alexander as Alfred Evelyn, Irene Vanbrugh as Clara Douglas, Winifred Emery as Lady Franklin, Herbert Tree as Graves and Stout, Laurence Irving as Sharp, Charles Hawtrey as Flat, Weedon Grossmith as Frantz, Sydney Valentine as Green, Alexandra Carlisle as Georgina Vesey, Cyril Maude as Sir Frederick Blount, Charles Rock as MacFinch, Norman Forbes as MacStucco, Sir John Hare as Sir John Vesey, and Lewis Waller as Sir John's Servant, and with music arranged by J. M. Glover.

Caste (play)

Caste
Among his parts were Prince Perovsky (Ours, Robertson, 1866), Sam Gerridge (Caste, Robertson, 1867), Bruce Fanquehere (Play, Robertson, 1868), Beau Farintosh (School, Robertson, 1869), Dunscombe Dunscombe (''M. Hare appeared in three films: Caste (1915), The Vicar of Wakefield and A Pair of Spectacles (both 1916).

Scala Theatre

Prince of Wales's TheatreQueen's TheatreThe Prince of Wales's Theatre
As a newly-married man Hare seriously considered leaving the stage in favour of more secure employment in the civil service; nevertheless he wrote to the actress and manager Marie Wilton, seeking to join a new company that she was setting up at the old Prince of Wales's Theatre in London.
A number of prominent actors played at the theatre during this period, among them Hare, Coghlan, the Kendals, and Ellen Terry.

Ellen Terry

Dame Ellen TerryEllenDame Alice Ellen Terry
Hare did not appear in all his own productions; he was not in the cast of Broken Hearts, although one part was evidently written with him in mind; in one of the greatest successes of his management, Olivia (1878), W. G. Wills's adaptation of The Vicar of Wakefield, he chose not to play the vicar but cast William Terris to co-star with Ellen Terry.
In 1876 she appeared as Lady Teazle in The School for Scandal, Blanche Haye in a revival of T. W. Robertson's Ours, and the title role in Olivia by William Gorman Wills at the Court Theatre (an adaptation of The Vicar of Wakefield), where she joined the company of John Hare.

Allan Aynesworth

Among the company in these years the actresses included Fanny Brough, Helen Maud Holt and the young May Whitty; among their male colleagues were George Alexander, Allan Aynesworth, Albert Chevalier, Henry Kemble, William Terris, Brandon Thomas and Lewis Waller.
before rejoining the company at the St James's the following month, under the management of John Hare and William Kendal; he played General de Pontac in a revival of The Ironmaster by Arthur Pinero.

The Notorious Mrs. Ebbsmith

The Notorious Mrs Ebbsmith
Two other Pinero plays followed during Hare's tenure: Lady Bountiful (1891), and The Notorious Mrs Ebbsmith (1895), with Mrs Patrick Campbell in the latter.

The Gay Lord Quex (play)

The Gay Lord QuexThe Gay Lord Quex'' (play)
In the West End in 1899 Hare had one of his greatest box-office and critical successes in the title role of Pinero's The Gay Lord Quex.
It was produced by John Hare, who also played the title role.

J. P. Wearing

Wearing, J. P.Wearing, J.P.
The theatre writer J. P. Wearing comments, "Even though Ptarmigant was a small role, Hare's thorough attention to detail reformed the way in which old male characters were recreated on stage".
His numerous articles include eleven entries for the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography on such persons as Pinero, William Archer, George Alexander, John Hare, Augustus Harris, Samuel Phelps and Mary Ebsworth.

Society (play)

SocietySociety'' (play)
Two months later Hare came to wide public and critical attention for his performance in T. W. Robertson's comedy Society.
Hetherington, Bancroft as Sidney Daryl, John Hare as Lord Ptarmigant, John Clarke as John Chodd, junior, Fred Dewar as Tom Stylus, and Sophie Larkin as Lady Ptarmigant, was to argue yourself unknown and so at

Broken Hearts

Occasionally he could be, in Wearing's phrase, "strict and peppery, and even sarcastic" at rehearsals, and Madge Kendal recounted a comically ferocious battle of wills between Hare and the equally intransigent Gilbert at a rehearsal of the latter's Broken Hearts in 1875.
Gilbert wrote Broken Hearts for his friend, John Hare of the Court Theatre.

Lewis Waller

Among the company in these years the actresses included Fanny Brough, Helen Maud Holt and the young May Whitty; among their male colleagues were George Alexander, Allan Aynesworth, Albert Chevalier, Henry Kemble, William Terris, Brandon Thomas and Lewis Waller.
Waller then joined William Hunter Kendal and John Hare at the St. James's Theatre, where he played the Duc de Bligny in The Ironmaster, Sir George Barclay in Lady Clancarty, and Lord Arden in The Wife's Secret.

Thomas Edgar Pemberton

T. Edgar PembertonPemberton, T. E.Pemberton, T. Edgar
The Kendals took the main roles but the laurels went to Hare in the comparatively small part of Potter, a performance described by the writer T. Edgar Pemberton as "a masterpiece of character-acting, faultless in get-up and, indeed, in all respects. … [A] keen instance of unexaggerated eccentricity".
He made his widest reputation as a theatrical biographer, writing memoirs of Edward Askew Sothern (1889), the Kendals (1891), T. W. Robertson (1892), John Hare (1895), Ellen Terry and her sisters (1902), and Sir Charles Wyndham (1905).

A Pair of Spectacles

Hare appeared in three films: Caste (1915), The Vicar of Wakefield and A Pair of Spectacles (both 1916).
A Pair of Spectacles is a 1916 British silent comedy film directed by Alexander Butler and starring John Hare, Peggy Hyland and Booth Conway, based on the play of the same name by Sydney Grundy.

Fred Terry

Fred
Hare made his American debut in January 1896, appearing at Abbey's Theatre, New York, with a company including Julia Neilson and Fred Terry, in The Notorious Mrs Ebbsmith, A Pair of Spectacles, A Quiet Rubber, and Gilbert's Comedy and Tragedy.
Two months later, the family travelled to America to perform with John Hare's company.