John Jay

Chief Justice John JayJayfirst Chief Justice of the United StatesGovernor John JaygrandfatherJay, JohnJohnthe same name
John Jay (December 23, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American statesman, patriot, diplomat, Founding Father of the United States, abolitionist, negotiator and signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783, second Governor of New York, and the first Chief Justice of the United States (1789–1795).wikipedia
637 Related Articles

Founding Fathers of the United States

Founding FathersFounding FatherFounding Father of the United States
John Jay (December 23, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American statesman, patriot, diplomat, Founding Father of the United States, abolitionist, negotiator and signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783, second Governor of New York, and the first Chief Justice of the United States (1789–1795).
Historian Richard B. Morris in 1973 identified the following seven figures as key Founding Fathers: John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and George Washington.

List of ambassadors of the United States to Spain

United States Ambassador to SpainU.S. Minister to SpainMinister to Spain
From 1779 to 1782, Jay served as the ambassador to Spain; he persuaded Spain to provide financial aid to the fledgling United States.

Dutch Americans

DutchDutch AmericanDutch-American
Jay was born into a wealthy family of merchants and New York City government officials of French and Dutch descent.
Two of the Founding Fathers of the United States, Egbert Benson and John Jay, were also of Dutch descent.

The Federalist Papers

Federalist PapersPubliusThe Federalist
He was a co-author of The Federalist Papers along with Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, and wrote five of the 85 essays.
The Federalist Papers is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution.

Treaty of Paris (1783)

Treaty of Paris1783 Treaty of ParisTreaty of Paris of 1783
John Jay (December 23, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American statesman, patriot, diplomat, Founding Father of the United States, abolitionist, negotiator and signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783, second Governor of New York, and the first Chief Justice of the United States (1789–1795).
Representing the United States were Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, Henry Laurens, and John Adams.

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
He was a co-author of The Federalist Papers along with Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, and wrote five of the 85 essays.
Madison became one of the leaders in the movement to ratify the Constitution, and he joined with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay in writing The Federalist Papers, a series of pro-ratification essays that is widely considered to be one of the most influential works of political science in American history.

Jay Court

The Jay Court experienced a light workload, deciding just four cases over six years.
The Jay Court refers to the Supreme Court of the United States from 1789 to 1795, when John Jay served as the first Chief Justice of the United States.

Jay Treaty

Jay's TreatyJay Treaty of 1794treaty
In 1794, while serving as Chief Justice, Jay negotiated the highly controversial Jay Treaty with Britain.
The Treaty was negotiated by John Jay and gained many of the primary American goals.

List of governors of New York

GovernorGovernor of New YorkNew York Governor
Jay served as the Governor of New York from 1795 to 1801.
Two governors have been Chief Justice of the United States: John Jay held that position when he was elected governor in 1795, and Charles Evans Hughes became chief justice in 1930, two decades after leaving the governorship.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
He was a co-author of The Federalist Papers along with Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, and wrote five of the 85 essays.
Through his connections with influential New York patriots such as Alexander McDougall and John Jay, Hamilton raised the New York Provincial Company of Artillery of sixty men in 1776, and was elected captain.

New York (state)

New YorkNew York StateNY
Jay served as the Governor of New York from 1795 to 1801.
The New York State Constitution was framed by a convention which assembled at White Plains on July 10, 1776, and after repeated adjournments and changes of location, finished its work at Kingston on Sunday evening, April 20, 1777, when the new constitution drafted by John Jay was adopted with but one dissenting vote.

Abolitionism in the United States

abolitionistabolitionistsabolitionism
Long an opponent of slavery, he helped enact a law that provided for the gradual emancipation of slaves, and the institution of slavery was abolished in New York in Jay's lifetime.
The New York Manumission Society was founded in 1785 by powerful politicians: John Jay, Alexander Hamilton, and Aaron Burr.

United States Secretary of Foreign Affairs

Secretary of Foreign AffairsU.S. Secretary of Foreign AffairsForeign Affairs
Following the end of the war, Jay served as Secretary of Foreign Affairs, directing United States foreign policy under the Articles of Confederation government.
He served until June 4, 1783 when he was succeeded by John Jay, who served until March 4, 1789, when the government under the Articles of Confederation gave way to the government under the Constitution.

Patriot (American Revolution)

PatriotPatriotsWhig
John Jay (December 23, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American statesman, patriot, diplomat, Founding Father of the United States, abolitionist, negotiator and signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783, second Governor of New York, and the first Chief Justice of the United States (1789–1795).

Peter Augustus Jay (lawyer)

Peter A. JayPeter Augustus JayPeter Augustus
He conveyed the Rye property to his eldest son, Peter Augustus Jay, in 1822.
Peter Augustus Jay (January 24, 1776 – February 20, 1843) was a prominent New York lawyer, politician and the eldest son of Founding Father and first United States Chief Justice, John Jay.

Jay Estate

1838 Peter Augustus Jay HouseBedford HouseJay Cemetery
What remains of the original 400 acre property is a 23 acre parcel called the Jay Estate.
The site is the surviving remnant of the 400 acre farm where US Founding Father, John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829), grew up.

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation and Perpetual UnionConfederationArticles
Following the end of the war, Jay served as Secretary of Foreign Affairs, directing United States foreign policy under the Articles of Confederation government.
In 1779, George Washington wrote to John Jay, who was serving as the president of the Continental Congress, "that a wagon load of money will scarcely purchase a wagon load of provisions."

Jay Heritage Center

Jay Estate
Stewardship of the site and several of its buildings for educational use was entrusted in 1990 by the New York State Board of Regents to the Jay Heritage Center.
is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization incorporated in 1990 and chartered by the New York State Board of Regents to act as stewards of the 23-acre Jay Estate, the National Historic Landmark home of American Founding Father John Jay.

Governor of New York

GovernorNew York Governorgovernorship
John Jay (December 23, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American statesman, patriot, diplomat, Founding Father of the United States, abolitionist, negotiator and signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783, second Governor of New York, and the first Chief Justice of the United States (1789–1795).
Additionally two Governors of New York, John Jay and Charles Evans Hughes, have served as Chief Justice of the United States.

William Jay (jurist)

William JayWilliam
This property passed down to their younger son William Jay and his descendants.
William Jay (June 16, 1789 – October 14, 1858) was an American reformer, jurist, and the son of Founding Father and first U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Jay.

New York Manumission Society

New-York Manumission SocietyNew-York Manumission SocietyNew-York Society for Promoting the Manumission of Slaves, and Protecting Such of Them as Have Been, or May be Liberated
Jay was the founder and president of the New York Manumission Society in 1785, which organized boycotts against newspapers and merchants involved in the slave trade, and provided legal counsel for free blacks claimed or kidnapped as slaves.
The New-York Manumission Society was an American organization founded in 1785 by U.S. Founding Father John Jay, among others, to promote the gradual abolition of slavery and manumission of slaves of African descent within the state of New York.

First Continental Congress

FirstContinental Congress1st Continental Congress
He believed the British tax measures were wrong and thought Americans were morally and legally justified in resisting them, but as a delegate to the First Continental Congress in 1774, Jay sided with those who wanted conciliation with Parliament.
Conservatives such as Joseph Galloway, John Dickinson, John Jay, and Edward Rutledge believed their task to be forging policies to pressure Parliament to rescind its unreasonable acts.

John Adams

AdamsJohnPresident John Adams
In the waning days of President John Adams's administration, Jay was confirmed by the Senate for another term as Chief Justice, but he declined the position and retired to his farm in Westchester County, New York, where he died.
Vergennes still disapproved of Adams, so Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John Jay, and Henry Laurens were appointed to collaborate with Adams, although Jefferson did not go to Europe and Laurens was posted to the Dutch Republic.

John Jay Homestead State Historic Site

John Jay HomesteadJohn Jay State Historic Site
Today this 62 acre park is preserved as the John Jay Homestead State Historic Site.
The site preserves the 1787 home of statesman John Jay (1745-1829), the first Chief Justice of the United States.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
After the establishment of the new federal government, Jay was appointed by President George Washington the first Chief Justice of the United States, serving from 1789 to 1795.
Chief Justice John Jay acted as Washington's negotiator and signed the treaty on November 19, 1794; critical Jeffersonians, however, supported France.