John Marshall

Portrait by Henry Inman, 1832
Marshall's birthplace monument in Germantown, Virginia
Coat of arms of Marshall
The Hollow House
John Marshall's House in Richmond, Virginia
Marshall's Chief Justice nomination
Steel engraving of John Marshall by Alonzo Chappel
The text of the McCulloch v. Maryland decision, handed down March 6, 1819, as recorded in the minutes of the US Supreme Court
Marshall's grave
John Marshall and George Wythe
Oak Hill
Chief Justice John Marshall by William Wetmore Story, at John Marshall Park in Washington, D.C.
Marshall was the subject of a 2005 commemorative silver dollar.
Marshall on the 1890 $20 Treasury Note, one of 53 people depicted on United States banknotes
John Marshall on a Postal Issue of 1894

American politician and lawyer who served as the fourth chief justice of the United States from 1801 until his death in 1835.

- John Marshall
Portrait by Henry Inman, 1832

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William Wirt (Attorney General)

American author and statesman who is credited with turning the position of United States Attorney General into one of influence.

American author and statesman who is credited with turning the position of United States Attorney General into one of influence.

Portrait of Elizabeth Wirt, painted ca. 1809–10 by Cephas Thompson
Wirt's Attorney General nomination
William Wirt Monument, Congressional Cemetery, Washington D.C.

On March 3, 1832, the decision in Worcester v. Georgia, authored by Chief Justice John Marshall, held that the Cherokee Nation was "a distinct community, occupying its own territory, with boundaries accurately described, in which the laws of Georgia can have no force, and which the citizens of Georgia have no right to enter but with the assent of the Cherokees themselves or in conformity with treaties and with the acts of Congress".

Routes of southern removals

Indian removal

The United States government policy of forced displacement of self-governing tribes of Native Americans from their ancestral homelands in the eastern United States to lands west of the Mississippi River – specifically, to a designated Indian Territory .

The United States government policy of forced displacement of self-governing tribes of Native Americans from their ancestral homelands in the eastern United States to lands west of the Mississippi River – specifically, to a designated Indian Territory .

Routes of southern removals
Representatives of the Five Civilized Tribes: (clockwise from upper left) Sequoyah, Pushmataha, Selecta, Osceola, and a typical Chickasaw

The Marshall court heard the case in Cherokee Nation v. Georgia (1831), but declined to rule on its merits; the court declaring that the Native American tribes were not sovereign nations, and could not "maintain an action" in U.S. courts.

Thomas Marshall (Virginia politician, born 1730)

Mary Randolph Keith

Thomas Marshall (2 April 1730 – 22 June 1802) was a Virginia surveyor, planter, military officer soldier and politician who served in the House of Burgesses and briefly in the Virginia House of Delegates and helped form the state of Kentucky, but may be best known as the father of Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court John Marshall.

Richmond, Virginia

Capital city of the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

Capital city of the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

Patrick Henry delivered his "Liberty or Death" speech at St. John's Church in Richmond, helping to ignite the American Revolution.
Confederate President Jefferson Davis
The White House of the Confederacy
Retreating Confederates burned one-fourth of Richmond in April 1865.
By the early 20th century Richmond had an extensive network of electric streetcars, as shown here crossing the Mayo Bridge across the James River, c. 1917.
The Richmond area, seen from the International Space Station in early April 2013. West is to the top
Richmond is often subdivided into the North Side, Southside, East End, and West End.
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Flooding of Old Manchester during Hurricane Agnes, 1972
Map of racial distribution in Richmond, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
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The Cathedral of the Sacred Heart, dedicated in 1906
Watts Hall at Union Presbyterian Seminary
Richmond tobacco warehouse c. 1910s
Six Fortune 500 companies are headquartered in the Richmond area.
1936 entrance to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
The Carpenter Theatre
Thomas Jefferson designed the Virginia State Capitol in Richmond.
Egyptian Building of the VCU School of Medicine (1845)
The Science Museum of Virginia, housed in Broad Street Station, designed by John Russell Pope
Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
Japanese Garden at Maymont
Richmond City Hall
Richmond's downtown Main Street Station

The John Marshall House, the home of the former Chief Justice of the United States, is also located downtown and features many of his writings and objects from his life.

Martin v. Hunter's Lessee

Landmark United States Supreme Court case decided on March 20, 1816.

Landmark United States Supreme Court case decided on March 20, 1816.

Though Chief Justice John Marshall wrote most of the Supreme Court opinions during his tenure, he did not write this opinion.

Joseph Story

Associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving from 1812 to 1845.

Associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving from 1812 to 1845.

Story by George Peter Alexander Healy
Story's grave
Bust of Joseph Story, sculpted by his son William Wetmore Story, currently on display at the United States Supreme Court building.

R. Kent Newmyer presents Story as a "Statesman of the Old Republic" who tried to be above democratic politics and to shape the law in accordance with the republicanism of Alexander Hamilton and John Marshall, and the New England Whigs of the 1820s and 1830s, including Daniel Webster.

Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.

Commerce Clause

Enumerated power listed in the United States Constitution .

Enumerated power listed in the United States Constitution .

Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.

Chief Justice John Marshall ruled in Gibbons v. Ogden (1824) that the power to regulate interstate commerce also included the power to regulate interstate navigation: "Commerce, undoubtedly is traffic, but it is something more—it is intercourse.... [A] power to regulate navigation is as expressly granted, as if that term had been added to the word 'commerce'.... [T]he power of Congress does not stop at the jurisdictional lines of the several states. It would be a very useless power if it could not pass those lines."

$5 stamp depicting Alexander Hamilton, the highest denomination in the Liberty issue

Liberty Issue

Definitive series of postage stamps issued by the United States between 1954 and 1965.

Definitive series of postage stamps issued by the United States between 1954 and 1965.

$5 stamp depicting Alexander Hamilton, the highest denomination in the Liberty issue
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40¢ John Marshall, Richmond, VA - Sep. 24, 1955

Coat of Arms of William Randolph

Randolph family of Virginia

Prominent political family, whose members contributed to the politics of Colonial Virginia and Virginia after statehood.

Prominent political family, whose members contributed to the politics of Colonial Virginia and Virginia after statehood.

Coat of Arms of William Randolph
Map showing Bermuda Hundred and other early settlements along the James River
Peyton Randolph (1721–1775), first and third President of the Continental Congress
John Marshall (1755–1835), 4th Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

John Marshall, great-grandson of Thomas Randolph of Tuckahoe, was the 4th Chief Justice of the United States.

Washington in 1828. Currently in the National Portrait Gallery

Bushrod Washington

Attorney and politician who served as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1798 to 1829.

Attorney and politician who served as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1798 to 1829.

Washington in 1828. Currently in the National Portrait Gallery
Coat of arms of the Washington family
Washington family tomb at Mount Vernon in 2014. Bushrod Washington's remains are interred in a vault at the rear of the tomb. His memorial is the obelisk at the right side of the photograph.

On the Supreme Court, he was a staunch ally of Chief Justice John Marshall.