A report on John Marshall

Portrait by Henry Inman, 1832
Marshall's birthplace monument in Germantown, Virginia
Coat of arms of Marshall
The Hollow House
John Marshall's House in Richmond, Virginia
Marshall's Chief Justice nomination
Steel engraving of John Marshall by Alonzo Chappel
The text of the McCulloch v. Maryland decision, handed down March 6, 1819, as recorded in the minutes of the US Supreme Court
Marshall's grave
John Marshall and George Wythe
Oak Hill
Chief Justice John Marshall by William Wetmore Story, at John Marshall Park in Washington, D.C.
Marshall was the subject of a 2005 commemorative silver dollar.
Marshall on the 1890 $20 Treasury Note, one of 53 people depicted on United States banknotes
John Marshall on a Postal Issue of 1894

American politician and lawyer who served as the fourth Chief Justice of the United States from 1801 until his death in 1835.

- John Marshall
Portrait by Henry Inman, 1832

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Daniel Webster

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American lawyer and statesman who represented New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the U.S. Congress and served as the U.S. Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore.

American lawyer and statesman who represented New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the U.S. Congress and served as the U.S. Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore.

Coat of Arms of Daniel Webster
New Hampshire historical marker (number 91) at his birthplace in present-day Franklin, New Hampshire
Daniel Webster's home in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The home has since been restored and is now part of the Strawbery Banke museum complex.
Daniel Webster represented the Second Bank of the United States both in the Congress and before the US Supreme Court as well serving as Director of its Boston branch on which he made out this $3,001.01 draft on July 24, 1824.
1834 portrait by Francis Alexander
Portion of painting, Webster's Reply to Hayne by George P.A. Healy
1836 electoral vote results
Through the Webster–Ashburton Treaty, Webster helped bring an end to a boundary dispute in Maine
Portrait of Daniel Webster commissioned by the Senate in 1955
Daniel Webster
Webster (red) won the support of several delegates at the 1852 Whig National Convention
Grace Fletcher
Colonel Fletcher Webster
Daniel Webster monument, Central Park, New York City, from the base: "Liberty and Union, Now and Forever, One and Inseparable"
Webster Hall, at Dartmouth College, houses the Rauner Special Collections Library, which holds some of Webster's personal belongings and writings, including his beaver fur top hat and silk socks.
1890 postage stamp honoring Webster

Though Congress was dominated by Democratic-Republicans, Chief Justice John Marshall ensured that the Federalist ideology retained a presence in the courts.

3rd Virginia Regiment

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Raised on December 28, 1775, at Alexandria, Virginia, for service with the Continental Army.

Raised on December 28, 1775, at Alexandria, Virginia, for service with the Continental Army.

Weedon was succeeded in command by Colonel Thomas Marshall, the father of Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall.

1800 United States presidential election

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The fourth quadrennial presidential election.

The fourth quadrennial presidential election.

Results by county explicitly indicating the percentage of the winning candidate in each county. Shades of blue are for Jefferson (Democratic-Republican) and shades of yellow are for Adams (Federalist).
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Aaron Burr tied Jefferson in the Electoral College vote
President
Former
{{nowrap|Vice President}}
Former

True or not, House Democratic-Republicans, who from the start of the 1800 campaign viewed Jefferson as their candidate for president and Burr for vice president, faced two abhorrent possible outcomes when the House met to vote: the Federalists could engineer a victory for Burr; or the Federalists could refuse to break the deadlock, leaving Federalist Secretary of State John Marshall as Acting President.

Midland, Virginia

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Census-designated place in Fauquier County, Virginia, United States.

Census-designated place in Fauquier County, Virginia, United States.

Midland is the closest community to the birthplace of John Marshall, the longest-serving Chief Justice in U.S. Supreme Court history.

Ogden v. Saunders

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United States Supreme Court case that determined the scope of a bankruptcy law in relation to a clause of the Constitution of the United States.

United States Supreme Court case that determined the scope of a bankruptcy law in relation to a clause of the Constitution of the United States.

Chief Justice John Marshall, Justice Gabriel Duvall, and Justice Joseph Story concurred in part and dissented in part to the Court's judgment, while Justices Bushrod Washington, Smith Thompson, and Robert Trimble dissented.

List of United States Supreme Court justices by time in office

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Established in 1789.

Established in 1789.

The longest serving Chief Justice was John Marshall, with a tenure of 12,570 days.

Richmond, Virginia

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Capital city of the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

Capital city of the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States.

Patrick Henry delivered his "Liberty or Death" speech at St. John's Church in Richmond, helping to ignite the American Revolution.
Confederate President Jefferson Davis
The White House of the Confederacy
Retreating Confederates burned one-fourth of Richmond in April 1865.
By the early 20th century Richmond had an extensive network of electric streetcars, as shown here crossing the Mayo Bridge across the James River, c. 1917.
The Richmond area, seen from the International Space Station in early April 2013. West is to the top
Richmond is often subdivided into the North Side, Southside, East End, and West End.
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Flooding of Old Manchester during Hurricane Agnes, 1972
Map of racial distribution in Richmond, 2010 U.S. Census. Each dot is 25 people:
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The Cathedral of the Sacred Heart, dedicated in 1906
Watts Hall at Union Presbyterian Seminary
Richmond tobacco warehouse c. 1910s
Six Fortune 500 companies are headquartered in the Richmond area.
1936 entrance to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
The Carpenter Theatre
Thomas Jefferson designed the Virginia State Capitol in Richmond.
Egyptian Building of the VCU School of Medicine (1845)
The Science Museum of Virginia, housed in Broad Street Station, designed by John Russell Pope
Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
Japanese Garden at Maymont
Richmond City Hall
Richmond's downtown Main Street Station

The John Marshall House, the home of the former Chief Justice of the United States, is also located downtown and features many of his writings and objects from his life.

Samuel Worcester, "Cherokee Messenger"

Samuel Worcester

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American missionary to the Cherokee, translator of the Bible, printer, and defender of the Cherokee sovereignty.

American missionary to the Cherokee, translator of the Bible, printer, and defender of the Cherokee sovereignty.

Samuel Worcester, "Cherokee Messenger"
Samuel Worcester's home in New Echota

Chief Justice John Marshall defined in his dicta that the federal government had an exclusive relationship with the Indian nations and recognized the latter's sovereignty, above state laws.

Portrait by Nathaniel Jocelyn

Elbridge Gerry

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American Founding Father, politician, and diplomat who served as the fifth vice president of the United States under President James Madison from 1813 until his death in 1814.

American Founding Father, politician, and diplomat who served as the fifth vice president of the United States under President James Madison from 1813 until his death in 1814.

Portrait by Nathaniel Jocelyn
John Adams (portrait by John Trumbull) held Gerry in high regard.
Ann Thompson
Gerry supported economic policies of Federalist Alexander Hamilton (portrait by Ezra Ames).
Charles Maurice de Talleyrand (portrait by François Gérard) insisted Gerry remain in Paris, even after negotiations had failed.
The word "gerrymander" (originally written "Gerry-mander") was used for the first time in the Boston Gazette newspaper on March 26, 1812. Appearing with the term, and helping spread and sustain its popularity, was this political cartoon, which depicts a state senate district in Essex County as a strange animal with claws, wings and a dragon-type head, satirizing the district's odd shape.
Grave of Elbridge Gerry at Congressional Cemetery
Elbridge Gerry House in Marblehead
General George Washington Resigning His Commission, by John Trumbull, shows Gerry standing on the left.

Gerry joined co-commissioners Charles Cotesworth Pinckney and John Marshall in France in October 1797 and met briefly with Foreign Minister Talleyrand.

Johnson v. M'Intosh

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Landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court that held that private citizens could not purchase lands from Native Americans.

Landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court that held that private citizens could not purchase lands from Native Americans.

As the facts were recited by Chief Justice John Marshall, the successor in interest to a private purchase from the Piankeshaw attempted to maintain an action of ejectment against the holder of a federal land patent.