A report on John Marshall

Portrait by Henry Inman, 1832
Marshall's birthplace monument in Germantown, Virginia
Coat of arms of Marshall
The Hollow House
John Marshall's House in Richmond, Virginia
Marshall's Chief Justice nomination
Steel engraving of John Marshall by Alonzo Chappel
The text of the McCulloch v. Maryland decision, handed down March 6, 1819, as recorded in the minutes of the US Supreme Court
Marshall's grave
John Marshall and George Wythe
Oak Hill
Chief Justice John Marshall by William Wetmore Story, at John Marshall Park in Washington, D.C.
Marshall was the subject of a 2005 commemorative silver dollar.
Marshall on the 1890 $20 Treasury Note, one of 53 people depicted on United States banknotes
John Marshall on a Postal Issue of 1894

American politician and lawyer who served as the fourth Chief Justice of the United States from 1801 until his death in 1835.

- John Marshall
Portrait by Henry Inman, 1832

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Shockoe Hill Cemetery

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Historic cemetery located on Shockoe Hill in Richmond, Virginia.

Historic cemetery located on Shockoe Hill in Richmond, Virginia.

Crypts of Chief Justice John Marshall (left) and his wife, Mary Willis Ambler Marshall, in Shockoe Hill Cemetery, Richmond, VA.

Among many notables interred at the Shockoe Hill Cemetery are Chief Justice John Marshall, Unionist spymaster Elizabeth Van Lew, Revolutionary War hero Peter Francisco, and Virginia Governor William H. Cabell.

Liberty Bell

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Iconic symbol of American independence, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Iconic symbol of American independence, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Pennsylvania State House as it appeared in the 1770s
The Liberty Bell's arrival at Zion Reformed Church in Allentown, Pennsylvania on September 24, 1777 is depicted in this watercolor painting. The Liberty Bell was hidden in Allentown for nine months until its June 27, 1778 return to Philadelphia
The Bellman Informed of the Passage of the Declaration of Independence, an 1854 depiction of the story of the Liberty Bell being rung on July 4, 1776
The Liberty Bell on its ornate stand in Independence Hall, 1872
The Liberty Bell visits Bunker Hill in Boston, 1903
The Liberty Bell is paraded through the streets of Philadelphia in 1908, in a recreation of its 1777 journey to Allentown.
The Bell's First Note, a 1913 painting of the Liberty Bell by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris
1915 photo of the Liberty Bell's hairline crack developed at some point in the 19th century, possibly in July 1835 as the bell rung following the death of U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall
A crowd of tourists gathers around the Liberty Bell, Independence Hall, July 1951
The Liberty Bell Pavilion in Philadelphia, the Liberty Bell's home from 1976 to 2003
The interior of the Liberty Bell chamber at the Liberty Bell Center. Independence Hall is in the background with the Liberty Bell visible in its steeple.
Independence Hall with the Liberty Bell Center to the right, August 2004
South end of Liberty Bell Center with both the Liberty Bell and a reflection of Independence Hall, January 2022
A view of the Liberty Bell's mount, October 2009
The Liberty Bell Museum in Allentown, Pennsylvania commemorates the successful hiding of the Liberty Bell from British troops in Allentown's Zion Church of Christ from 1777-1778.

The bell acquired its distinctive large crack some time in the early 19th century—a widespread story claims it cracked while ringing after the death of Chief Justice John Marshall in 1835.

Routes of southern removals

Indian removal

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The United States government policy of forced displacement of self-governing tribes of Native Americans from their ancestral homelands in the eastern United States to lands west of the Mississippi River – specifically, to a designated Indian Territory .

The United States government policy of forced displacement of self-governing tribes of Native Americans from their ancestral homelands in the eastern United States to lands west of the Mississippi River – specifically, to a designated Indian Territory .

Routes of southern removals
Representatives of the Five Civilized Tribes: (clockwise from upper left) Sequoyah, Pushmataha, Selecta, Osceola, and a typical Chickasaw

The Marshall court heard the case in Cherokee Nation v. Georgia (1831), but declined to rule on its merits; the court declaring that the Native American tribes were not sovereign nations, and could not "maintain an action" in U.S. courts.

Photographic portrait of Edward Carrington Marshall

Edward Carrington Marshall

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Virginia farmer, planter, businessman, and politician.

Virginia farmer, planter, businessman, and politician.

Photographic portrait of Edward Carrington Marshall

The youngest son of Chief Justice John Marshall and his wife, the former Mary Willis Ambler (both families being among the First Families of Virginia), Edward Carrington Marshall was born in Richmond.

Portrait of Francis Fauquier, for whom Fauquier County was named

Fauquier County, Virginia

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County in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

County in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Portrait of Francis Fauquier, for whom Fauquier County was named
View west along I-66/SR 55 and north along US 17 in northwestern Fauquier County

John Marshall, born in Fauquier County, Chief Justice of the United States.

Albert J. Beveridge

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American historian and US senator from Indiana.

American historian and US senator from Indiana.

He was an intellectual leader of the Progressive Era and a biographer of Chief Justice John Marshall and President Abraham Lincoln.

Dartmouth College v. Woodward

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Landmark decision in United States corporate law from the United States Supreme Court dealing with the application of the Contracts Clause of the United States Constitution to private corporations.

Landmark decision in United States corporate law from the United States Supreme Court dealing with the application of the Contracts Clause of the United States Constitution to private corporations.

Webster's speech in support of Dartmouth (which he described as "a small college," adding, "and yet there are those who love it") was so moving that it apparently helped convince Chief Justice John Marshall.

Thomas Francis Marshall

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Politician and lawyer from Kentucky.

Politician and lawyer from Kentucky.

He was the nephew of John Marshall.

Philip P. Barbour Presiding officer

Virginia Constitutional Convention of 1829–1830

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Constitutional convention for the state of Virginia, held in Richmond from October 5, 1829 to January 15, 1830.

Constitutional convention for the state of Virginia, held in Richmond from October 5, 1829 to January 15, 1830.

Philip P. Barbour Presiding officer
The Virginia Constitutional Convention, 1830, by George Catlin
Capitol at Richmond VA, where Convention of 1829-30 met
<center>John Randolph Conservative</center>
<center>John Marshall Reformer</center>
<center>Abel P. Upshur Conservative</center>
<center>Thomas J. Randolph for gradual emancipation</center>

In answer, John Marshall advanced his view with a petition from the freeholders of Richmond which observed that, "Virtue, intelligence, are not among the products of the soil. Attachment to [slave] property, often a sordid sentiment, is not to be confounded with the sacred flame of patriots."

James Keith Marshall

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Virginia planter and politician.

Virginia planter and politician.

Born to Chief Justice John Marshall and his wife Mary Willis Ambler Marshall (1766–1831) in Richmond on February 13, 1800, James Keith Marshall had several brothers and sisters.