John Marshall

Portrait by Henry Inman, 1832
Marshall's birthplace monument in Germantown, Virginia
Coat of arms of Marshall
The Hollow House
John Marshall's House in Richmond, Virginia
Marshall's Chief Justice nomination
Steel engraving of John Marshall by Alonzo Chappel
The text of the McCulloch v. Maryland decision, handed down March 6, 1819, as recorded in the minutes of the US Supreme Court
Marshall's grave
John Marshall and George Wythe
Oak Hill
Chief Justice John Marshall by William Wetmore Story, at John Marshall Park in Washington, D.C.
Marshall was the subject of a 2005 commemorative silver dollar.
Marshall on the 1890 $20 Treasury Note, one of 53 people depicted on United States banknotes
John Marshall on a Postal Issue of 1894

American politician and lawyer who served as the fourth chief justice of the United States from 1801 until his death in 1835.

- John Marshall
Portrait by Henry Inman, 1832

102 related topics

Alpha

Oak Hill (Delaplane, Virginia)

Historic home of the Marshall family in Delaplane, Virginia and a working farm with a view of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Historic home of the Marshall family in Delaplane, Virginia and a working farm with a view of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

The earlier and smaller house, a Colonial farmhouse measuring 32 x, was built in 1773 by Colonel Thomas Marshall, father of John Marshall, Chief Justice of the United States.

Iustitia ("Lady Justice") is a symbolic personification of the coercive power of a tribunal: a sword representing state authority, scales representing an objective standard and a blindfold indicating that justice should be impartial.

Ware v. Hylton

Decision of the United States Supreme Court holding that treaties take precedence over state law under the U.S. Constitution.

Decision of the United States Supreme Court holding that treaties take precedence over state law under the U.S. Constitution.

Iustitia ("Lady Justice") is a symbolic personification of the coercive power of a tribunal: a sword representing state authority, scales representing an objective standard and a blindfold indicating that justice should be impartial.

Ware is also notable for having been argued on both sides by several prominent legal minds of the time, including Patrick Henry, John Wickham, and John Marshall, who would later become Chief Justice of the Court.

Monument at John Marshall birthplace

John Marshall Birthplace Park

Small park located in the historic Germantown area in southern Fauquier County, Virginia.

Small park located in the historic Germantown area in southern Fauquier County, Virginia.

Monument at John Marshall birthplace
Plaque affixed to monument

The park provides access to a dedication monument at or near the birthplace of John Marshall.

Photographic portrait of Edward Carrington Marshall

Edward Carrington Marshall

Virginia farmer, planter, businessman, and politician.

Virginia farmer, planter, businessman, and politician.

Photographic portrait of Edward Carrington Marshall

The youngest son of Chief Justice John Marshall and his wife, the former Mary Willis Ambler (both families being among the First Families of Virginia), Edward Carrington Marshall was born in Richmond.

Official portrait, 1946

George C. Marshall

American army officer and statesman.

American army officer and statesman.

Official portrait, 1946
1900 VMI Keydets football team. Marshall circled
Colonel Marshall in France in 1919
Brigadier General Marshall in 1938
Cover to the book Infantry in Battle, the World War II officer's guide to infantry combat operations. Marshall directed production of the book, which is still used as a reference today.
Army Chief of Staff Marshall with Secretary of War Henry Stimson
Army Chief of Staff George C. Marshall with Chief of the Army Air Force General Henry "Hap" Arnold in England on July 23, 1945.
President Truman, Marshall, Secretary of State James F. Byrnes, and General Arnold at the White House, August 1945
General Marshall with Chiang Kai-shek and Zhou Enlai in China, 1946.
General Marshall being sworn in as Secretary of State by Chief Justice Fred Vinson in the Oval Office on January 21, 1947.
Secretary of State Marshall speaks to The House Appropriations Committee. January 15, 1948.
Secretary of Defense George C. Marshall in his office at The Pentagon.
Secretary of Defense George C. Marshall discussing the Korean War with President Truman and Special Assistant to the President Averell Harriman in the Oval Office.
Dodona Manor, the 19th century home and gardens of George Marshall and his wife Katherine
Cover of Together: Annals of an Army Wife, by Katherine Tupper Marshall. Published 1946.
Grave site of George Marshall at Arlington National Cemetery
George Marshall portrait by Thomas E. Stephens (c. 1949)
A statue of General Marshall is unveiled at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies on April 30, 1998.
President Roosevelt's nomination of General Marshall to be Major General. June 30, 1939.
President Harry S. Truman awarding General Marshall an Oak Leaf Cluster to his Distinguished Service Medal on November 26, 1945.
General Marshall's Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour (France)
General Marshall's Congressional Gold Medal. Designed by Anthony de Francisci in 1946.
General John Pershing rides under Arc de Triomphe in parade with aide-de-camp George C. Marshall. 1919.
General John Pershing (left) with Colonel Marshall in France, 1919.
Left to right: Brig. Gen. Frank Parker, Col. James A. Drain, and Lt. Col. George C. Marshall at the White House in Washington, D.C., on October 4, 1924.
Marshall as Army Chief of Staff, 1940.
Army Chief of Staff George Marshall with Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. "Hap" Arnold accompanying Brig. Gen. James H. Doolittle while being presented the Medal of Honor from President Franklin Roosevelt for his achievement on leading the Doolittle Raid. April 18, 1942.
Oveta Culp Hobby being sworn in as the first WAAC by Major General Myron C. Cramer. General George C. Marshall, second from left, and Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson witness the ceremony. May 16, 1942.
Army Chief of Staff George Marshall, 1944
Generals George C. Marshall and Henry "Hap" Arnold in 1944.
General Marshall greets Major General John R. Deane and Brigadier General Stuart Cutler while arriving at Potsdam, Germany on July 15, 1945.
General Marshall with General of The Air Force Henry H. Arnold and Air Force Major General Lauris Norstad at The Potsdam Conference in Germany, July 21, 1945.
Recently sworn in George C. Marshall as the new United States Secretary of State shaking hands with his predecessor James F. Byrnes, as President Truman looks on, at the White House, January 21, 1947.
Secretary of State George Marshall greeted by President Harry S. Truman at Washington National Airport. August 13, 1947.
Secretary of State Marshall pointing out landmarks at Mount Vernon to Mexican President Miguel Aleman. April 1947.
Award of honorary degrees at Harvard to J Robert Oppenheimer (left), George C. Marshall (third from left), Omar N. Bradley (fifth from left), and T. S. Eliot (second from right). The President of Harvard University, James B. Conant, sits between Marshall and Bradley. June 5, 1947.
Secretary of Defense Marshall with President Truman and Princeton University President Harold W. Dodds at the Library of Congress. May 17, 1950.
Anna M. Rosenberg being sworn in as Assistant Secretary of Defense by Felix Larkin (left), General Counsel of the Department of Defense. General George Marshall (second from right) and Robert A. Lovett (right), Deputy Secretary of Defense, witness. November 15, 1950.
Secretary of Defense George C. Marshall with President Truman, Secretary of State Dean Acheson, and Prime Minister of France Rene Pleven during Pleven visit to Washington D.C., at the White House on January 29, 1951.
Secretary of Defense George C. Marshall greeting President Truman following Truman's return from the Wake Island Conference at Washington National Airport, October 18, 1950.

He was also a first cousin, three times removed, of former Chief Justice John Marshall.

A highway sign designating the border between Nicholas and Greenbrier counties in West Virginia along a secondary road

Marshall County, West Virginia

County in the U.S. state of West Virginia.

County in the U.S. state of West Virginia.

A highway sign designating the border between Nicholas and Greenbrier counties in West Virginia along a secondary road

It was named in honor of John Marshall, Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court, who died that year.

A highway sign designating the border between Nicholas and Greenbrier counties in West Virginia along a secondary road

Marshall County, Kentucky

County located in far western portion of the U.S. state of Kentucky.

County located in far western portion of the U.S. state of Kentucky.

A highway sign designating the border between Nicholas and Greenbrier counties in West Virginia along a secondary road

Marshall County was named in honor of Chief Justice John Marshall of the United States Supreme Court, who had died in 1835.

Population of Marshall County from US census data

Marshall County, Iowa

County located in the U.S. state of Iowa.

County located in the U.S. state of Iowa.

Population of Marshall County from US census data
2000 Census Age Pyramid for Marshall County

The county was formed on January 13, 1846, and named after John Marshall, Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

A highway sign designating the border between Nicholas and Greenbrier counties in West Virginia along a secondary road

Marshall County, Indiana

County in the U.S. state of Indiana.

County in the U.S. state of Indiana.

A highway sign designating the border between Nicholas and Greenbrier counties in West Virginia along a secondary road

It was named for U.S. Chief Justice John Marshall, who died in 1835.

Marshall County at the time of its creation

Marshall County, Illinois

County located in the U.S. state of Illinois.

County located in the U.S. state of Illinois.

Marshall County at the time of its creation
Marshall County in 1843, when its eastern border was extended to bring it to its current size

It was named in honor of John Marshall, Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court, who died in 1835.