No Results Found!
105 Related Articles

Seismometer

seismographseismographsseismometers
John Milne (30 December 1850 – 31 July 1913 ) was a British geologist and mining engineer who worked on a horizontal seismograph.
After 1880, most seismometers were descended from those developed by the team of John Milne, James Alfred Ewing and Thomas Gray, who worked as foreign-government advisors in Japan from 1880 to 1895.

Fusakichi Omori

In addition, the foreign professors trained Japanese students including Seikei Sekiya who would become, at the Imperial University, the first professor of seismology at any university in the world and his successor, Fusakichi Omori who refined Milne's instruments to detect and record finer vibrations.
Omori studied physics with the initial British foreign advisors serving as professors at the Imperial University of Tokyo, especially John Milne until he left Japan in 1895, as well as Japanese colleagues including Seikei Sekiya who in 1880 became the first professor of seismology at any university in the world at Tokyo Imperial University.

King's College London

King's College, LondonKing's CollegeKing’s College London
He was educated at King's College London (AKC in Applied Science, 1870) and the Royal School of Mines.
Notable alumni in the sciences include Nobel laureates Peter Higgs (Physics), Michael Levitt (Chemistry), Max Theiler (Medicine) and Sir Frederick Hopkins (Medicine); polymath Sir Francis Galton; Raymond Gosling who took Photograph 51 which was critical evidence in identifying the structure of DNA; co-discoverers of Hepatitis C and of the Hepatitis D genome Michael Houghton and Qui-Lim Choo; pioneer of in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) Patrick Steptoe; mammal cloning pioneer Keith Campbell; pathologist Thomas Hodgkin; founder of modern hospice philosophy Dame Cicely Saunders; botanist David Bellamy; Shaw Prize laureate Sir Richard Doll; Kyoto Prize laureate Anthony Pawson; Wolf Prize laureates Michael Fisher (Physics) and Sir James Gowans (Medicine); Lasker Award winner John Hughes; Gairdner Foundation International Award winner R. John Ellis; Beriberi researcher Takaki Kanehiro; inventor of Kerosene Abraham Pineo Gesner; inventor of the Seismometer John Milne, and at least 111 Fellows of the Royal Society.

John Perry (engineer)

John PerryPerry, JohnProf. John Perry
Milne was hired by the Meiji government of the Empire of Japan as a foreign advisor and professor of mining and geology at the Imperial College of Engineering in Tokyo from 8 March 1876, where he worked under Henry Dyer and with William Edward Ayrton and John Perry.
He was a colleague of William Edward Ayrton and John Milne at the Imperial College of Engineering in Tokyo, 1875–79, and was also a Fellow of the Royal Society.

Thomas Lomar Gray

Thomas GrayT. Lomar Gray
In 1880, Sir James Alfred Ewing, Thomas Gray and John Milne, all British scientists working in Japan, began to study earthquakes following a very large tremor which struck the Yokohama area that year.
At the recommendation of John Milne, he was hired by the government of Japan as a foreign advisor and arrived in Tokyo in 1879 to assume to post of Professor of Telegraph Engineering in the Physical Laboratories at the Tokyo Imperial University.

Royal School of Mines

School of MinesGovernment School of MinesARSM
He was educated at King's College London (AKC in Applied Science, 1870) and the Royal School of Mines.

Alfred Ewing

James Alfred EwingSir James Alfred EwingSir Alfred Ewing
In 1880, Sir James Alfred Ewing, Thomas Gray and John Milne, all British scientists working in Japan, began to study earthquakes following a very large tremor which struck the Yokohama area that year.
His investigations into earthquakes led him to help T. Lomar Gray and John Milne of the Imperial College of Engineering to develop the first modern seismograph, from 1880–1895.

Funk Island

FunkFunk Island Ecological ReserveIsland of Penguin
During this time he also wrote papers on the interaction of ice and rock, and visited Funk Island, writing another paper on the newly extinct great auk.
In July 1873 seismologist and naturalist John Milne went to the island and was successful in retrieving partial skeletons and miscellaneous bones before inclement weather cut short his stay.

Seismological Society of Japan

They founded the Seismological Society of Japan (SSJ).
John Milne joined James Alfred Ewing, Thomas Lomar Gray and Thomas Corwin Mendenhall in founding the Seismological Society in 1880.

Foreign government advisors in Meiji Japan

foreign advisoro-yatoi gaikokujinoyatoi gaikokujin
Milne was hired by the Meiji government of the Empire of Japan as a foreign advisor and professor of mining and geology at the Imperial College of Engineering in Tokyo from 8 March 1876, where he worked under Henry Dyer and with William Edward Ayrton and John Perry.

Milnrow

Milne was born in Liverpool, England, the only child of John Milne of Milnrow, and at first raised in Rochdale and later moved to Richmond, London.
John Milne was a professor, geologist and mining engineer who invented a pioneering seismograph (known as the Milne-Shaw seismograph) to detect and measure earthquakes.

William Scoresby Routledge

His first cousin William Scoresby Routledge (related through his mother, Emma Twycross) was also an anthropologist.
William was the first cousin of British seismographer, John Milne(1850–1913) who worked in Japan during the Meiji Restoration.

Order of the Rising Sun

Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising SunOrder of the Rising Sun, 4th Class, Gold Rays with RosetteOrder of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon
Soon after his arrival he learned that the Emperor had conferred upon him a rare distinction, The Third Grade of the Order of the Rising Sun and a life pension of 1,000 yen.

Shide, Isle of Wight

ShideShide Quarry
Milne resigned his posts on 20 June 1895 and returned to England with his Japanese wife, settling at Shide Hill House, Shide, on the Isle of Wight, where he continued his seismographic studies.
It was the home and workplace of John Milne (1850–1913), inventor of the horizontal pendulum seismograph after he retired from the Imperial College of Engineering in Tokyo, Japan.

William Edward Ayrton

William E. AyrtonWilliam AyrtonAyrton, William Edward
Milne was hired by the Meiji government of the Empire of Japan as a foreign advisor and professor of mining and geology at the Imperial College of Engineering in Tokyo from 8 March 1876, where he worked under Henry Dyer and with William Edward Ayrton and John Perry.

Royal Medal

RoyalRoyal Society Royal MedalQueen's Medal
He delivered the Bakerian Lecture to the Royal Society in 1906 entitled Recent Advances in Seismology and was awarded their Royal Medal in 1908.

Isle of Wight

IOWWightIsland
Milne resigned his posts on 20 June 1895 and returned to England with his Japanese wife, settling at Shide Hill House, Shide, on the Isle of Wight, where he continued his seismographic studies.

W. K. Burton

William Kinnimond BurtonWilliam Kinninmond Burton
In 1898, Milne (with W. K. Burton) published Earthquakes and Other Earth Movements, which came to be regarded as a classic textbook on earthquakes.
Burton worked with seismologist John Milne in co writing and co photographing a book that recorded the disastrous great earthquake of 1891.

Royal Society Bakerian Medal

Bakerian LectureBakerian lecturerBakerian Lectureship
He delivered the Bakerian Lecture to the Royal Society in 1906 entitled Recent Advances in Seismology and was awarded their Royal Medal in 1908.

St Paul's Church, Newport, Isle of Wight

St Paul's ChurchSt Paul, BartonSt Paul, Stapler's Road
Milne died of Bright's disease on 31 July 1913 and is buried in St. Paul's Church, Newport.
*Professor John Milne 1913

International Seismological Summary

This work was destined to develop in the International Seismological Summary being set up immediately after the First World War.
The need for an international exchange of seismology data was recognised by John Milne, who in 1899 began collating and publishing data from 35 observatories from around the world.

Geologist

geologistsgeoscientistgeoscientists
John Milne (30 December 1850 – 31 July 1913 ) was a British geologist and mining engineer who worked on a horizontal seismograph.

Engineer

engineersconsulting engineerIr.
John Milne (30 December 1850 – 31 July 1913 ) was a British geologist and mining engineer who worked on a horizontal seismograph.

Liverpool

Liverpool, EnglandLiverpudlianCity of Liverpool
Milne was born in Liverpool, England, the only child of John Milne of Milnrow, and at first raised in Rochdale and later moved to Richmond, London.

Rochdale

Rochdale, EnglandRochdale, LancashireRochdale (ENG)
Milne was born in Liverpool, England, the only child of John Milne of Milnrow, and at first raised in Rochdale and later moved to Richmond, London.