John Nash (architect)

John NashNashSir John Nash[John] Nash
John Nash (18 January 1752 – 13 May 1835) was one of the foremost British architects of the Regency and Georgian eras, during which he was responsible for the design, in the neoclassical and picturesque styles, of many important areas of London.wikipedia
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Regency era

RegencyRegency periodBritish Regency
John Nash (18 January 1752 – 13 May 1835) was one of the foremost British architects of the Regency and Georgian eras, during which he was responsible for the design, in the neoclassical and picturesque styles, of many important areas of London.
As one of the greatest patrons of the arts, the Prince Regent ordered the costly building and refurbishing of the beautiful and exotic Brighton Pavilion, the ornate Carlton House, as well as many other public works and architecture (see John Nash, James Burton, and Decimus Burton).

George IV of the United Kingdom

George IVKing George IVPrince Regent
His designs were financed by the Prince Regent, and by the era's most successful property developer, James Burton, with whose son Decimus Burton he collaborated extensively. Nash was a dedicated Whig and was a friend of Charles James Fox through whom Nash probably came to the attention of the Prince Regent (later King George IV).
He commissioned John Nash to build the Royal Pavilion in Brighton and remodel Buckingham Palace, and Sir Jeffry Wyatville to rebuild Windsor Castle.

Regent Street

Lower Regent StreetRegent Street, LondonHeddon Street
Nash's best-known solo designs are the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, Marble Arch, and Buckingham Palace; his best known collaboration with James Burton is Regent Street; and his best-known collaborations with Decimus Burton are Regent's Park and its terraces and Carlton House Terrace.
It is named after George, the Prince Regent (later George IV) and was laid out under the direction of the architect John Nash and James Burton.

Buckingham Palace

Buckingham HouseGoring Housethe Palace
Nash's best-known solo designs are the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, Marble Arch, and Buckingham Palace; his best known collaboration with James Burton is Regent Street; and his best-known collaborations with Decimus Burton are Regent's Park and its terraces and Carlton House Terrace.
During the 19th century it was enlarged, principally by architects John Nash and Edward Blore, who constructed three wings around a central courtyard.

Georgian era

GeorgianGeorgian periodGeorgian England
John Nash (18 January 1752 – 13 May 1835) was one of the foremost British architects of the Regency and Georgian eras, during which he was responsible for the design, in the neoclassical and picturesque styles, of many important areas of London.
Georgian society and its preoccupations were well portrayed in the novels of writers such as Henry Fielding, Mary Shelley and Jane Austen, characterised by the architecture of Robert Adam, John Nash and James Wyatt and the emergence of the Gothic Revival style, which hearkened back to a supposed golden age of building design.

Carlton House Terrace

Carlton Gardens1 Carlton Gardens1 Carlton House Terrace
Nash's best-known solo designs are the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, Marble Arch, and Buckingham Palace; his best known collaboration with James Burton is Regent Street; and his best-known collaborations with Decimus Burton are Regent's Park and its terraces and Carlton House Terrace.
These terraces were built on Crown land between 1827 and 1832 to overall designs by John Nash, but with detailed input by other architects including Decimus Burton, who exclusively designed No.

Marble Arch

London location of the same nameMarble Arch districtMarble Arch, London
Nash's best-known solo designs are the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, Marble Arch, and Buckingham Palace; his best known collaboration with James Burton is Regent Street; and his best-known collaborations with Decimus Burton are Regent's Park and its terraces and Carlton House Terrace.
The structure was designed by John Nash in 1827 to be the state entrance to the cour d'honneur of Buckingham Palace; it stood near the site of what is today the three-bayed, central projection of the palace containing the well known balcony.

Decimus Burton

Decimus
His designs were financed by the Prince Regent, and by the era's most successful property developer, James Burton, with whose son Decimus Burton he collaborated extensively. In some instances, these were left in the hands of other architects such as James Pennethorne and the young Decimus Burton.
He was taught by his father, James Burton, Sir John Soane, and John Nash.

Robert Taylor (architect)

Sir Robert TaylorRobert TaylorRobert (later Sir Robert) Taylor
From 1766 or 67, John Nash trained with the architect Sir Robert Taylor; the apprenticeship was completed in 1775 or 1776.
His pupils included John Nash, Samuel Pepys Cockerell, George Byfield and William Pilkington.

James Burton (property developer)

James BurtonJames Burton, the pre-eminent property developer of Georgian LondonAlfred Burton
His designs were financed by the Prince Regent, and by the era's most successful property developer, James Burton, with whose son Decimus Burton he collaborated extensively.
James financed, patronized, and built the other projects of John Nash around Regent’s Park - most of which were predominantly designed by James's son, Decimus Burton, rather than by Nash himself - to the extent that the Commissioners of Woods described James, not Nash, as ‘the architect of Regent’s Park’.

East Cowes Castle

Lough Cooter Castle
In 1798, he purchased a plot of land of 30 acre at East Cowes on which he erected 1798–1802 East Cowes Castle as his residence.
East Cowes Castle, located in East Cowes, was the home of architect John Nash between its completion and his death in 1835.

Llanerchaeron

Llanaeron Home FarmLlanerch AeronLlanerchaeron Parkrun
One of the finest of these villas is Llanerchaeron, at least a dozen villas were designed throughout south Wales.
Llanerchaeron, known as "Llanayron House" to its nineteenth-century occupants, is a grade I listed mansion on the River Aeron, designed and built in 1795 by John Nash for Major (later Colonel) William Lewis as a model, self-sufficient farm complex located near Ciliau Aeron, some 2½ miles south-east of Aberaeron, Ceredigion, Wales.

Luscombe Castle

The finest of the dozen country houses that Nash designed as picturesque castles include the relatively small Luscombe Castle Devon (1800–04), Ravensworth Castle (Tyne and Wear) begun 1807 only finally completed in 1846, was one of the largest houses by Nash, Caerhays Castle in Cornwall (1808–10), Shanbally Castle, County Tipperary (1818–1819) was the last of these castles to be built.
Upon purchasing the land at Luscombe in 1797, Charles Hoare demolished the existing house and commissioned architects John Nash and Humphrey Repton to design a new house and gardens at the site.

Italianate architecture

ItalianateItalianate styleItalian Villa
Nash developed the asymmetry of his castles in his Italianate villas.
The Italianate style was first developed in Britain in about 1802 by John Nash, with the construction of Cronkhill in Shropshire.

John Edwards-Vaughan

John Edwards
16 was built at the same time the home of Nash's cousin John Edwards, a lawyer who handled all of Nash's legal affairs.
He was the son of John Edwards of Belvedere House, Lambeth, Surrey, who had bought an estate in the Neath valley and built Rheola House to a design by John Nash.

Aberystwyth

Aberystwyth, WalesAberystwithGlanyrafon
In the short term Price would commission Nash to design Castle House Aberystwyth (1795).
Hafod Uchtryd was a mansion built by Thomas Johnes from 1783, part of it being designed by John Nash.

James Pennethorne

Sir James Pennethorne
In some instances, these were left in the hands of other architects such as James Pennethorne and the young Decimus Burton.
Pennethorne was born in Worcester, and travelled to London in 1820 to study architecture, first under Augustus Charles Pugin and then under John Nash.

Humphry Repton

Humphrey ReptonRepton
He met Humphry Repton at Stoke Edith in 1792 and formed a successful partnership with the landscape garden designer.
In the 1790s he often worked with the relatively unknown architect John Nash, whose loose compositions suited Repton's style.

Cronkhill

His first such exercise was Cronkhill (1802), others included Sandridge Park (1805) and Southborough Place, Surbiton, (1808).
Cronkhill, Atcham, Shropshire, designed by John Nash, is "the earliest Italianate villa in England".

John Adey Repton

John
As Nash developed his architectural practice it became necessary to employ draughtsmen, the first in the early 1790s was Augustus Charles Pugin, then a bit later in 1795 John Adey Repton son of Humphry.
From 1796 to 1800 he was assistant to John Nash of Carlton House, the great London architect, and he then joined his father at Hare Street near Romford, Essex preparing architectural designs as adjuncts to landscape gardening.

East Cowes

Cowes
In 1798, he purchased a plot of land of 30 acre at East Cowes on which he erected 1798–1802 East Cowes Castle as his residence.
As the Isle of Wight was the target of frequent French invasions, with some notable incursions, the fort built at East Cowes was later destroyed and should not be confused with the "East Cowes Castle" built subsequently by John Nash.

Dover Street

CCA Galleriesthat street
In June 1797, he moved into 28 Dover Street, a building of his own design.
In June 1797 John Nash moved into 28 Dover Street a building of his own design, he built an even bigger house next door at 29 into which he moved the following year.

Augustus Charles Pugin

Auguste PuginPuginAugustus Pugin
As Nash developed his architectural practice it became necessary to employ draughtsmen, the first in the early 1790s was Augustus Charles Pugin, then a bit later in 1795 John Adey Repton son of Humphry.
Shortly afterwards he obtained a position as an architectural draughtsman with the architect John Nash.

Prince regent

Prince-RegentregentRegent of Belgium
Nash was a dedicated Whig and was a friend of Charles James Fox through whom Nash probably came to the attention of the Prince Regent (later King George IV).
The architect John Nash, under the patronage of HRH The Prince Regent, planned a palatial summer residence for the prince, 50 detached villas in a parkland setting and elegant terraces around the exterior of the park.

St Davids Cathedral

St David's CathedralSt DavidSt. David's Cathedral
By 1789 St David's Cathedral was suffering from structural problems, the west front was leaning forward by one foot, Nash was called in to survey the structure and develop a plan to save the building, his solution completed in 1791 was to demolish the upper part of the facade and rebuild it with two large but inelegant flying buttresses.
The Welsh architect John Nash was commissioned to restore the west front in 1793 to repair the damage done two hundred years previously.