A report on John Nash (architect)

66 Great Russell Street
17 Bloomsbury Square
Nash's unexecuted 1794 design for County Hall Stafford
Llanerchaeron
Nash's own house, East Cowes Castle, on the Isle of Wight, (demolished)
A bust of John Nash, in the portico, All Souls Langham Place
The Quadrant, Regent Street, since rebuilt
The Royal Pavilion Brighton
Buckingham Palace East front as designed by Nash
John Nash's tomb in St. James's churchyard East Cowes
J.M.W. Turner's picture of East Cowes, commissioned 1827 by Nash
An architectural model of the Marble Arch, about 1826 designed by John Nash V&A Museum no. A.14–1939
All Souls Langham Place
The interior looking east, All Souls Langham Place
The interior looking west, All Souls Langham Place
The interior looking north, All Souls Langham Place
St Mary Haggerston
The Rotunda Woolwich
Cumberland Terrace
Cumberland Terrace
Carlton House Terrace
Theatre Royal Haymarket
Buckingham Palace Garden Front
The Royal Mews, Buckingham Palace
Park Crescent
East side, Park Square
West side, Park Square
Marble Arch
Chester Terrace
Detail, Chester Terrace
Clarence House
York Gate
Ulster Terrace
Former United Services Club
Nash's plan for Regent Street
Conservatory, Kew Gardens
King's Opera House, demolished
Royal Opera Arcade
Hanover Terrace
Gloucester Gate
Sussex Place
Sussex Place
Regent's Park, still largely as planned by Nash
St. James's Park, Nash's lake
The Gothic Dining Room, Carlton House, Destroyed
York Terrace
Albany Terrace
Cornwall Terrace
Blaise Hamlet
Blaise Hamlet
Circular Cottage, Blaise Hamlet
Entrance to Attingham Park
Cronkhill
Caerhays Castle
The Royal Pavilion Brighton
The entrance, The Royal Pavilion Brighton
Banqueting Room, The Royal Pavilion Brighton
The kitchen, The Royal Pavilion Brighton
Grovelands Park
Witley Court
Newport, Guildhall, I.o.W.
Sundridge Park
Longner Hall
Luscombe Castle
Remains of Ravensworth Castle
Chalfont Park
Knepp Castle
Sundridge Park
Sandridge Park, Devon
St. Non's Church Llanerchaeron
Temple Druid House
Hafod Uchtryd
Clytha Castle
Foley House
Rear facade of Foley House
Clytha Park Main gates
Hermon Hill House
Ffynone House, wings added later not by Nash
Hawarden Castle
Swiss cottage, Cahir
Shanbally Castle
Lough Cutra Castle

One of the foremost British architects of the Georgian and Regency eras, during which he was responsible for the design, in the neoclassical and picturesque styles, of many important areas of London.

- John Nash (architect)

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Regent's Park Lake

Regent's Park

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One of the Royal Parks of London.

One of the Royal Parks of London.

Regent's Park Lake
Regent's Park c.1833
Memorial to the soldiers killed in Regent's Park in the 1982 Hyde Park and Regent's Park bombings
Gloucester Gate
Sussex Place
Winfield House
St John's Lodge
Park Crescent, home of International Students House, is just above Regent's Park station

The Park was designed by John Nash and James and Decimus Burton.

Coronation portrait by Thomas Lawrence, 1821

George IV

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King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and King of Hanover from the death of his father, King George III, on 29 January 1820 until his own death ten years later.

King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and King of Hanover from the death of his father, King George III, on 29 January 1820 until his own death ten years later.

Coronation portrait by Thomas Lawrence, 1821
George (left) with his mother Queen Charlotte and younger brother Frederick. Portrait by Allan Ramsay, 1764
Portrait miniature by Richard Cosway, c. 1780–82
Mezzotint engraving by Samuel William Reynolds, based on a painting by Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1785
Miniature by Richard Cosway, 1792
Portrait by Sir William Beechey, 1798
Profile by Sir Thomas Lawrence, c. 1814
Portrait in Garter robes by Lawrence, 1816
George IV's coronation, 19 July 1821
George IV at Holyhead en route to Ireland on 7 August 1821, the day of his wife's death
Half-crown of George IV, 1821
Portrait by Sir David Wilkie depicting the King during his 1822 trip to Scotland
Lithograph of George IV in profile, by George Atkinson, printed by C. Hullmandel, 1821
"A Voluptuary Under The Horrors of Digestion": 1792 caricature by James Gillray from George's time as Prince of Wales
Statue of George IV in Trafalgar Square, London

He commissioned John Nash to build the Royal Pavilion in Brighton and remodel Buckingham Palace, and commissioned Jeffry Wyatville to rebuild Windsor Castle.

Looking north along Regent Street in April 2011, with Union Flags hung to celebrate the wedding of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

Regent Street

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Major shopping street in the West End of London.

Major shopping street in the West End of London.

Looking north along Regent Street in April 2011, with Union Flags hung to celebrate the wedding of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge
Looking north along Regent Street in April 2011, with Union Flags hung to celebrate the wedding of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge
Panoramic view of Oxford Circus; the location where Oxford Street meets Regent Street
Regent Street proposal, published 1813, titled "PLAN, presented to the House of Commons, of a STREET proposed from CHARING CROSS to PORTLAND PLACE, leading to the Crown Estate in Marylebone Park"
The Quadrant, Regent Street in 1837, seen from Piccadilly Circus. The buildings have since been replaced
The Quadrant on Regent Street, leading to Piccadilly Circus
Photograph of Regent Street in 1942, facing Piccadilly Circus
Liberty is at the junction of Regent Street with Great Marlborough Street
Hamleys Store in Regent Street
The Apple Store on Regent Street
Broadcasting House is immediately north of the top end of Regent Street, and has been used by the BBC since 1932
The University of Westminster's official flag in royal blue above No. 309 Regent Street
All Souls Church next to Broadcasting House, as seen from The Heights
Nigel Mansell driving a Jordan Formula One car on Regent Street in 2004

It is named after George, the Prince Regent (later George IV) and was laid out under the direction of the architect John Nash and James Burton.

Decimus Burton by Sir Thomas Lawrence

Decimus Burton

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One of the foremost English architects and landscapers of the 19th century.

One of the foremost English architects and landscapers of the 19th century.

Decimus Burton by Sir Thomas Lawrence
Carlton Gardens, to the design of which Burton made extensive contributions
The Burton family mansion, The Holme in Regent's Park, which was built by the company of James Burton to a design by Decimus Burton. It has been described as "one of the most desirable private homes in London" by architectural scholar Guy Williams, and "a definition of Western civilization in a single view" by architectural critic Ian Nairn.
Marble Arch before its relocation at the entrance to the newly rebuilt Buckingham Palace
Aerial view of Marble Arch
Phoenix Park – Dublin, Republic of Ireland
Great Conservatory, Chatsworth House, with Joseph Paxton
Holy Trinity Church, Eastbourne
Adelaide Crescent, Hove, Brighton, Burton's houses are on the left.
St Augustine's Church, Flimwell
North Street with Kenilworth Road in background
Steps down to Kings Road
Warrior Square Station, St Leonard's-on-Sea
Cornwall Terrace
Chester Terrace
York Terrace
Inner Circle, Regent's Park, 1833 Schmollinger map
St. John's Lodge, Regent's Park
London Colosseum
London Zoo c.1854
Hyde Park and part of Kensington Gardens c.1833
Screen, Hyde Park Corner
Aerial view of Hyde Park
Wellington Arch, Hyde Park Corner
Green Park, London, and Constitution Hill
St James's Park Lake, to the northwest, and Buckingham Palace
Green Park and St. James's Park c.1833
Athenaeum Club, London
Charing Cross Hospital, Villiers Street London, c. 1902
Elizabeth Gate, Kew Gardens
Palm House, Kew Gardens
The Temperate House, Kew Gardens
Kew Gardens Water Lily House
Holwood House, Keston
Bay House, main entrance
Holy Trinity Church, Tunbridge Wells
Calverley House, c. 1860, Royal Tunbridge Wells
Calverley Park gardens
Calverley Park Crescent Royal Tunbridge Wells
Tunbridge Wells, Victoria Lodge
St Peter's Church, Southborough, Kent
Church of St Mary, Riverhead, Kent
Great Culverden Park Lake
Former Customs House, Fleetwood
Beach Lighthouse (Fleetwood)
The North Euston Hotel, Fleetwood
Pharos Lighthouse (Fleetwood)
St Peter's Church, Fleetwood
Queen's Terrace, Fleetwood
Queen's Terrace (1844), Fleetwood
Gate and lodges, Sennowe Hall, Norfolk
Grimston Park, Yorkshire 1839-40
Burton's King Edward VI Grammar School, Retford
St Mary's Church, Goring-by-Sea
Phoenix Monument, Phoenix Park, Dublin
Dublin - Phoenix Park Jaunting car Postcard, c. 1905
Phoenix Park - Wellington Monument
Garda (Police) HQ in Dublin's Phoenix Park
Dublin Zoo entrance lodge (1833)
Queenstown, aka Cobh, c. 1890
Cobh dominates Cork Harbour

Subsequent to the Crown Estate's refusal to finance them, James Burton agreed to personally finance the construction projects of John Nash at Regent's Park, which he had already been commissioned to construct.

Pyramidal Tomb of James Burton (1761–1837) and Burton family at St Leonards-on-Sea, England.

James Burton (property developer)

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The most successful property developer of Regency and of Georgian London, in which he built over 3000 properties in 250 acres.

The most successful property developer of Regency and of Georgian London, in which he built over 3000 properties in 250 acres.

Pyramidal Tomb of James Burton (1761–1837) and Burton family at St Leonards-on-Sea, England.
The Holme, the Burton family mansion in Regent's Park, designed by his son Decimus Burton
Burton was a cousin of the poet Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet.
Regent Street
Regent's Park, designed by his son Decimus Burton
Cornwall Terrace, designed by his son Decimus Burton
Chester Terrace, designed by his son Decimus Burton
York Terrace, designed by his son Decimus Burton
Clarence Terrace, designed by his son Decimus Burton
Athenaeum Club, London, designed by his son Decimus Burton, and of which he and Decimus were founders
Bedford Square
Tavistock Square
Bloomsbury Square

James also financed and built other projects of John Nash at Regent's Park (most of which were designed by James's son Decimus Burton, rather than by Nash) to the extent that the Commissioners of Woods described James, not Nash, as 'the architect of Regent's Park'.

The frontage of Carlton House

Carlton House

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Mansion in Westminster, best known as the town residence of King George IV.

Mansion in Westminster, best known as the town residence of King George IV.

The frontage of Carlton House
Plan showing the main floor and the suite of reception rooms on the lower ground floor
Fencing Match between Chevalier de Saint-Georges and 'La chevalière D'Éon' on April 9, 1787 in Carlton House, painting by Charles Jean Robineau
The main staircase, from Pyne's Royal Residences (1819)

The location of the house, now replaced by Carlton House Terrace, was a main reason for the creation of John Nash's ceremonial route from St James's to Regent's Park via Regent Street, Portland Place and Park Square: Lower Regent Street and Waterloo Place were originally laid out to form the approach to its front entrance.

Aerial view of Buckingham Palace during Queen Elizabeth II's official 90th birthday celebrations in 2016. The principal façade, the East Front, was originally completed in 1850, and was remodelled in 1913 by Aston Webb.

Buckingham Palace

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London royal residence and the administrative headquarters of the monarch of the United Kingdom.

London royal residence and the administrative headquarters of the monarch of the United Kingdom.

Aerial view of Buckingham Palace during Queen Elizabeth II's official 90th birthday celebrations in 2016. The principal façade, the East Front, was originally completed in 1850, and was remodelled in 1913 by Aston Webb.
Buckingham House, c. 1710
The palace c. 1837, depicting Marble Arch, a ceremonial entrance. It was moved to make way for the east wing in 1847.
The Victoria Memorial
Piano nobile of Buckingham Palace. The areas defined by shaded walls represent lower minor wings. Note: This is an unscaled sketch plan for reference only. Proportions of some rooms may slightly differ in reality.
A state banquet in the Ballroom
The 1844 Room
President Nixon with members of the royal family in the ground floor Marble Hall

During the 19th century it was enlarged, principally by architects John Nash and Edward Blore, who constructed three wings around a central courtyard.

Portrait of Humphry Repton

Humphry Repton

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The last great English landscape designer of the eighteenth century, often regarded as the successor to Capability Brown; he also sowed the seeds of the more intricate and eclectic styles of the 19th century.

The last great English landscape designer of the eighteenth century, often regarded as the successor to Capability Brown; he also sowed the seeds of the more intricate and eclectic styles of the 19th century.

Portrait of Humphry Repton
Business card for Humphry Repton by Thomas Medland
Illustration of Wentworth Woodhouse, South Yorkshire before proposed landscaping
Illustration of Wentworth Woodhouse, South Yorkshire after proposed landscaping
Repton's grave in Aylsham, Norfolk

In the 1790s he often worked with the relatively unknown architect John Nash, whose loose compositions suited Repton's style.

View of the Royal Pavilion

Royal Pavilion

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Grade I listed former royal residence located in Brighton, England.

Grade I listed former royal residence located in Brighton, England.

View of the Royal Pavilion
The richly decorated Banqueting Room at the Royal Pavilion, from John Nash's Views of the Royal Pavilion (1826)
The ceiling of the Music Room at the Royal Pavilion
Grand Saloon at the Royal Pavilion in Brighton from John Nash's Views of the Royal Pavilion (1826)
The Royal Pavilion at dusk
Hospital beds at the Dome during the First World War
Pavilion Gardens walkway
Pavilion Gardens with Pavilion in the background
Domes
Royal Pavilion Brighton and reflective pool
Rooftop

The current appearance of the Pavilion, with its domes and minarets, is the work of architect John Nash, who extended the building starting in 1815.

Prince George by Lawrence (c. 1814)

Regency era

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Commonly applied to the longer period between c. 1795 and 1837.

Commonly applied to the longer period between c. 1795 and 1837.

Prince George by Lawrence (c. 1814)
Change in Bond Street, James Gillray
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, portrait by Sir Thomas Lawrence, 1814
Lord Byron
Edward Jenner
Joseph Banks
John Nash
Horatio Nelson
Walter Scott
"Neckclothitania", 1818
Astley's Amphitheatre, 1808-1811
Brighton Pavilion, 1826
Carlton House, Pall Mall London.
Vauxhall Gardens, 1808–1811
Church of All Souls, architect John Nash, 1823
Regent's Canal, Limehouse, 1823
Frost Fair, Thames River, 1814
The Piccadilly entrance to the Burlington Arcade, 1819
Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales and Prince Leopold of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, 1817
Morning dress, Ackermann, 1820
Water at Wentworth, Humphry Repton, 1752–1818
Hanover Square, Horwood Map, 1819
Beau Brummell, 1805
Battle of Waterloo, 1815
Almack's Assembly Room, 1805–1825
Drury Lane interior. 1808
Balloon ascent, James Sadler, 1811
The Anatomist, Thomas Rowlandson, 1811
Regent's Park, Schmollinger map, 1833
100 Pall Mall, former location of National Gallery, 1824–1834
Cognocenti, Gillray Cartoon, 1801
Custom Office, London Docks, 1811-1843
Custom and Excise, London Docks, 1820
Mail coach, 1827
Assassination of Spencer Perceval, 1812
The pillory at Charing Cross, Ackermann's Microcosm of London, 1808–11
Covent Garden Theatre, 1827–28
Tom Cribb vs Tom Molineaux, 1811
Football being played in Scotland, c. 1830.

The Regency era overlapped with Romanticism and many of the major artists, musicians, novelists and poets of the Romantic movement were prominent Regency figures such as Jane Austen, William Blake, Lord Byron, John Constable, John Keats, John Nash, Ann Radcliffe, Walter Scott, Mary Shelley, Percy Bysshe Shelley, J. M. W. Turner and William Wordsworth.