John Quincy Adams

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John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was an American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, and diarist who served as the sixth president of the United States from 1825 to 1829.wikipedia
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Andrew Jackson

JacksonJacksonianPresident Andrew Jackson
The 1824 presidential election was contested by Adams, Andrew Jackson, William H. Crawford, and Henry Clay, all of whom were members of the Democratic-Republican Party.
As no candidate won an electoral majority, the House of Representatives elected John Quincy Adams in a contingent election.

Braintree, Massachusetts

BraintreeSouth Braintree, MassachusettsSouth Braintree
Born in Braintree, Massachusetts, Adams spent much of his youth in Europe, where his father served as a diplomat. John Quincy Adams was born on July 11, 1767, to John and Abigail Adams (née Smith) in a part of Braintree, Massachusetts that is now Quincy.
The town of Braintree was the birthplace of presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams, as well as statesman John Hancock.

1824 United States presidential election

18241824 presidential election1824 election
The 1824 presidential election was contested by Adams, Andrew Jackson, William H. Crawford, and Henry Clay, all of whom were members of the Democratic-Republican Party.
On February 9, 1825, the House chose John Quincy Adams as president.

James Monroe

MonroePresident MonroePresident James Monroe
In 1817, newly-elected President James Monroe selected Adams as his Secretary of State.
In foreign affairs, Monroe and Secretary of State John Quincy Adams favored a policy of conciliation with Britain and a policy of expansionism against the Spanish Empire.

Democratic-Republican Party

Democratic-RepublicanDemocratic-RepublicansRepublican
Initially a Federalist like his father, he won election to the presidency as a member of the Democratic-Republican Party, and in the mid-1830s became affiliated with the Whig Party.
Lacking an effective opposition, the Democratic-Republicans split into groups after the 1824 presidential election; one faction supported President John Quincy Adams, while the other faction backed General Andrew Jackson.

Adams–Onís Treaty

Adams-Onís TreatyAdams-Onis TreatyAdams–Onis Treaty
In that role, Adams negotiated the Adams–Onís Treaty, which provided for the American acquisition of Florida.
The Adams–Onís Treaty was negotiated by John Quincy Adams, the Secretary of State under U.S. President James Monroe, and the Spanish "minister plenipotentiary" (diplomatic envoy) Luis de Onís y González-Vara, during the reign of King Ferdinand VII.

1828 United States presidential election

18281828 presidential election1828 election
The Democrats proved to be more effective political organizers than Adams and his National Republican supporters, and Jackson decisively defeated Adams in the 1828 presidential election.
It featured a re-match of the 1824 election, as President John Quincy Adams of the National Republican Party faced Andrew Jackson of the Democratic Party.

Henry Clay

ClayHenry Clay, Sr.Clay, Henry
The 1824 presidential election was contested by Adams, Andrew Jackson, William H. Crawford, and Henry Clay, all of whom were members of the Democratic-Republican Party.
Clay finished with the fourth-most electoral votes in the multi-candidate 1824 presidential election, and he helped John Quincy Adams win the contingent election held to select the president.

Quincy, Massachusetts

QuincyQuincy, MAMount Wollaston
John Quincy Adams was born on July 11, 1767, to John and Abigail Adams (née Smith) in a part of Braintree, Massachusetts that is now Quincy.
Known as the "City of Presidents," Quincy is the birthplace of two U.S. presidents—John Adams and his son John Quincy Adams—as well as John Hancock, a President of the Continental Congress and the first signer of the Declaration of Independence, as well as being the 1st and 3rd Governor of Massachusetts.

Abigail Adams

AbigailAbigail Smith AdamsAbigail Smith
John Quincy Adams was born on July 11, 1767, to John and Abigail Adams (née Smith) in a part of Braintree, Massachusetts that is now Quincy. He was the eldest son of John Adams, who served as the second US president from 1797 to 1801, and First Lady Abigail Adams.
Abigail Adams (née Smith; November 22, [O.S. November 11] 1744 – October 28, 1818) was the wife and closest advisor of John Adams, as well as the mother of John Quincy Adams.

John Adams

AdamsJohnPresident John Adams
John Quincy Adams was born on July 11, 1767, to John and Abigail Adams (née Smith) in a part of Braintree, Massachusetts that is now Quincy. He was the eldest son of John Adams, who served as the second US president from 1797 to 1801, and First Lady Abigail Adams.
He and his wife generated a family of politicians, diplomats, and historians now referred to as the Adams political family, which includes their son John Quincy Adams, the sixth president of the United States.

Florida

FLState of FloridaFloridian
In that role, Adams negotiated the Adams–Onís Treaty, which provided for the American acquisition of Florida.
Control was necessary according to Secretary of State John Quincy Adams because Florida had become "a derelict open to the occupancy of every enemy, civilized or savage, of the United States, and serving no other earthly purpose than as a post of annoyance to them."

Whig Party (United States)

WhigWhig PartyWhigs
Initially a Federalist like his father, he won election to the presidency as a member of the Democratic-Republican Party, and in the mid-1830s became affiliated with the Whig Party.
In the 1824 presidential election, Speaker of the House Henry Clay, Secretary of the Treasury William H. Crawford, Secretary of State John Quincy Adams, and General Andrew Jackson all sought the presidency as members of the Democratic-Republican Party.

Texas annexation

annexation of Texasannexationannexed Texas
He was particularly opposed to the annexation of Texas and the Mexican–American War, which he saw as a war to extend slavery.
The US-Spain border along the northern frontier of Texas took shape in the 1817–1819 negotiations between Secretary of State John Quincy Adams and the Spanish ambassador to the United States, Luis de Onís y González-Vara.

John Quincy

Colonel John Quincy
He was named for his mother's maternal grandfather, Colonel John Quincy, after whom Quincy, Massachusetts, is named.
His granddaughter Abigail Adams named her son, the future President John Quincy Adams, after him.

United States Electoral College

Electoral Collegepresidential electorelectoral votes
As no candidate won a majority of the electoral vote, the House of Representatives held a contingent election to determine the president, and Adams won that contingent election with the support of Clay.
In 1824, Andrew Jackson, a slaveowner from Tennessee, was similarly defeated by John Quincy Adams, an outspoken critic of slavery.

Louisa Adams

Louisa Catherine AdamsLouisa Catherine JohnsonLouisa
Adams spent the winter of 1795–96 in London, where he met Louisa Catherine Johnson, the second daughter of American merchant Joshua Johnson.
Louisa Catherine Adams (née Johnson; February 12, 1775 – May 15, 1852), wife of John Quincy Adams, was the First Lady of the United States from 1825 to 1829.

Monroe Doctrine

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He also helped formulate the Monroe Doctrine, which became a key tenet of U.S. foreign policy.
The full document of the Monroe Doctrine, written chiefly by future-President and then Secretary of State John Quincy Adams, is long and couched in diplomatic language, but its essence is expressed in two key passages.

Contingent election

electno candidate receives the minimum 270 electoral votes needed to win the electiontie-breaker by the United States House of Representatives
As no candidate won a majority of the electoral vote, the House of Representatives held a contingent election to determine the president, and Adams won that contingent election with the support of Clay.
In 1824, the presence of four candidates split the Electoral College, and Andrew Jackson lost the contingent election to John Quincy Adams despite winning a plurality of both the popular and electoral vote.

William H. Crawford

William CrawfordWilliam Harris CrawfordCrawford Republican
The 1824 presidential election was contested by Adams, Andrew Jackson, William H. Crawford, and Henry Clay, all of whom were members of the Democratic-Republican Party.
Under the terms of the Constitution, the House selected from the three candidates who received the most electoral votes, leaving Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, and Crawford in the running.

List of ambassadors of the United States to Germany

United States Ambassador to GermanyU.S. Ambassador to GermanyAmbassador to Germany
When the elder Adams became president, he appointed his son as the U.S. ambassador to Prussia.
Prior to 1835, the United States and Prussia recognized one another but did not exchange representatives, except for a brief period when John Quincy Adams was accredited to the Prussian court from 1797 to 1801.

List of ambassadors of the United States to Portugal

United States Ambassador to PortugalU.S. Minister to PortugalAmbassador to Portugal
In 1796, Washington appointed Adams as the U.S. ambassador to Portugal.

Anti-Masonic Party

Anti-MasonicAnti-MasonAnti-Masons
He joined the Anti-Masonic Party in the early 1830s before becoming a member of the Whig Party, which united those opposed to President Jackson.
In New York, at this time the supporters of President John Quincy Adams, called "Adams men", or Anti-Jacksonians, or National Republicans, were a feeble organization.

List of ambassadors of the United States to the Netherlands

United States Ambassador to the NetherlandsU.S. Minister to the NetherlandsAmbassador to the Netherlands
In 1794, Washington appointed Adams as the U.S. ambassador to the Netherlands; Adams considered declining the role but ultimately took the position at the advice of his father.
Notable Americans such as former Presidents Adams and John Quincy Adams, General Hugh Ewing and Iraq Envoy L. Paul Bremer have held the title of Ambassador.

Mexican–American War

Mexican-American WarMexican WarMexican American War
He was particularly opposed to the annexation of Texas and the Mexican–American War, which he saw as a war to extend slavery.
Sixty-seven Whigs voted against the war on a key slavery amendment, but on the final passage only 14 Whigs voted no, including Rep. John Quincy Adams.