John Quincy Adams

AdamsJohn QuincyJohn Q. AdamsJ. Q. AdamsPresident John Quincy AdamsJ.Q. AdamsJQA12th District reissued in 1883Adams RepublicanAdams Supporter
John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was an American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, and diarist who served as the sixth president of the United States from 1825 to 1829.wikipedia
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Oregon boundary dispute

Oregon QuestionOregon DisputeOregon Crisis
Adams favored the annexation of the entirety of Oregon Country, a disputed region occupied by both the United States and Britain, and was disappointed when President Polk signed the Oregon Treaty, which divided the land between the two claimants at the 49th parallel.
Monroe inquired the opinion of Secretary of State John Quincy Adams for potential revisions.

United First Parish Church

United First Parish Church, Quincy, MassachusettsFirst Parish ChurchUnited First Parish Church (Quincy, Massachusetts)
After Louisa's death in 1852, his son had his parents reinterred in the expanded family crypt in the United First Parish Church across the street, next to John and Abigail.
It is called the Church of the Presidents because two American Presidents, John Adams and John Quincy Adams, attended the church along with their wives, Abigail Adams and Louisa Catherine Adams.

Ellis Gray Loring

In 1841, at the request of Lewis Tappan and Ellis Gray Loring, Adams joined the case of United States v. The Amistad.
He and Lewis Tappan visited the 72-year-old John Quincy Adams at his home and persuaded him to take the case.

Horace Mann

H.MannAmerican educational reformer of the same namefamous educational reformer
In the spring of 1848 he was elected to the United States Congress as a Whig to fill the vacancy caused by the death of John Quincy Adams.

Congress of Panama

Panama CongressAmphictyonic" Congress of PanamaAmphictyonic Congress
As part of this goal, the administration favored sending a U.S. delegation to the Congress of Panama, an 1826 conference of New World republics organized by Simón Bolívar.
President John Quincy Adams and Secretary of State Henry Clay wanted the US to attend the congress, only been invited due to pressure on Bolívar; but as Hispanic America had outlawed slavery, politicians from the Southern United States held up the mission by not approving funds or confirming the delegates.

Treaty of Indian Springs (1825)

Treaty of Indian Springssecond Treaty of Indian SpringsTreaties of 1825
Early in his term, Adams suspended the Treaty of Indian Springs after learning that the Governor of Georgia, George Troup, had forced the treaty on the Muscogee.
A delegation from the Creek National Council, led by chief Opothleyahola, traveled to Washington, D.C. with a petition to the American president John Quincy Adams to have it revoked.

Hancock Cemetery

His original interment was temporary, in the public vault at the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. Later, he was interred in the family burial ground in Quincy, Massachusetts, across from the First Parish Church, called Hancock Cemetery.
It was the resting place of Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams and their wives, Abigail Adams and Louisa Adams (respectively), before they were moved to the crypt in the United First Parish Church.

Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft

The think tank is named after U.S. President John Quincy Adams, who as Secretary of State said, in a speech on July 4, 1821, that the U.S. "goes not abroad in search of monsters to destroy".

William Henry Harrison

William H. HarrisonHarrisonWilliam Harrison
Whig nominee William Henry Harrison defeated Van Buren in the 1840 presidential election, and the Whigs gained control of both houses of Congress for the first time.

Ebon Moss-Bachrach

He was also portrayed by Anthony Hopkins in the 1997 film Amistad, and again by Ebon Moss-Bachrach and Steven Hinkle in the 2008 HBO television miniseries John Adams; the HBO series received criticism for needless historical and temporal distortions in its portrayal.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was an American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, and diarist who served as the sixth president of the United States from 1825 to 1829.
Under the Twelfth Amendment, the House was required to choose a president from among the top three electoral vote recipients: Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, and William H. Crawford.

Boston

Boston, MassachusettsBoston, MABoston, United States
After returning to the United States, Adams established a successful legal practice in Boston.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
In 1794, President George Washington appointed Adams as the U.S. ambassador to the Netherlands, and Adams would serve in high-ranking diplomatic posts until 1801, when Thomas Jefferson took office as president.

Russia

Russian FederationRUSRussian
In 1809, Adams was appointed as the U.S. ambassador to Russia by President James Madison, a member of the Democratic-Republican Party.

War of 1812

The War of 1812American War of 1812war
Adams held diplomatic posts for the duration of Madison's presidency, and he served as part of the American delegation that negotiated an end to the War of 1812.

Foreign policy of the United States

U.S. foreign policyAmerican foreign policyforeign policy
He also helped formulate the Monroe Doctrine, which became a key tenet of U.S. foreign policy.

Internal improvements

Internal ImprovementimprovementsInternal Improvement Fund
As president, Adams called for an ambitious agenda that included federally-funded infrastructure projects, the establishment of a national university, and engagement with the countries of Latin America, but many of his initiatives were defeated in Congress.

Latin America

Latin AmericanLatin-AmericaCentral and South America
As president, Adams called for an ambitious agenda that included federally-funded infrastructure projects, the establishment of a national university, and engagement with the countries of Latin America, but many of his initiatives were defeated in Congress.