John Rennie the Elder

John RennieRennieJohn Rennie (engineer)John Rennie (senior)John Rennie (the Elder)John Rennie SeniorMr. Rennie
John Rennie FRSE FRS (7 June 1761 – 4 October 1821) was a Scottish civil engineer who designed many bridges, canals, docks and warehouses, and a pioneer in the use of structural cast-iron.wikipedia
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Kennet and Avon Canal

Kennet and Avon Canal CompanyKennet and Avon NavigationKennet & Avon Canal
The Kennet and Avon Canal — including the Dundas Aqueduct, Caen Hill Locks and Crofton Pumping Station — occupied him between 1794 and 1810.
In 1793 a further survey was conducted by John Rennie, and the route of the canal was altered to take a more southerly course through Great Bedwyn, Devizes, Trowbridge and Newbury.

George Rennie (agriculturalist)

George RennieGeorge
His older brother George remained to assist in the family agricultural business, achieving notability in this arena.
He was the son of James Rennie, farmer, of Phantassie, Haddingtonshire (now East Lothian), and elder brother of John Rennie, the engineer, born on his father's farm in 1749.

Rochdale Canal

RochdaleDeansgate LocksRochdale Canal Company
His early projects included the Lancaster Canal (started 1792), the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation (1793), the Crinan Canal (1794-1801), Rudyard Lake (1797) and the Rochdale Canal, which passes through difficult country between Rochdale and Todmorden (1799).
Further progress was not made until 1791, when John Rennie was asked to make a new survey in June, and two months later to make surveys for branches to Rochdale, Oldham and to a limeworks near Todmorden.

Rudyard Lake

RudyardRudyard Reservoir
His early projects included the Lancaster Canal (started 1792), the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation (1793), the Crinan Canal (1794-1801), Rudyard Lake (1797) and the Rochdale Canal, which passes through difficult country between Rochdale and Todmorden (1799).
Rudyard Lake was constructed by the engineer John Rennie, for the Trent and Mersey Canal company in 1797–98 to feed the Caldon Canal.

Phantassie

Phantassie Doocot
He was born the younger son of James Rennie, a farmer near Phantassie, near East Linton, East Lothian, Scotland.
The 704 acre Phantassie Farm and Workshop, presently owned by Hamilton Farmers, is the birthplace and childhood home of the civil engineer John Rennie the Elder (1761-1821), and his brother George Rennie (1749-1828).

Lancaster Canal

LancasterLancaster and Kendal CanalLancaster Canal Company
His early projects included the Lancaster Canal (started 1792), the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation (1793), the Crinan Canal (1794-1801), Rudyard Lake (1797) and the Rochdale Canal, which passes through difficult country between Rochdale and Todmorden (1799).
In 1791, John Longbotham, Robert Dickinson and Richard Beck resurveyed the proposed line, and a final survey was carried out later the same year by John Rennie.

Crinan Canal

CrinanThe Crinan Canal
His early projects included the Lancaster Canal (started 1792), the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation (1793), the Crinan Canal (1794-1801), Rudyard Lake (1797) and the Rochdale Canal, which passes through difficult country between Rochdale and Todmorden (1799).
It was designed by civil engineer John Rennie and work started in 1794, but was not completed until 1801, two years later than planned.

Waterloo Bridge

Waterloo
Over the next few years Rennie also attained a deserved reputation as a builder of bridges, combining stone with new cast-iron techniques to create previously unheard-of low, wide, elliptical arches, at Leeds Bridge, and in London at Waterloo Bridge (1811–1817), with its nine equal arches and perfectly flat roadway (thought to be influenced by Thomas Harrison's design of Skerton Bridge over the River Lune in Lancaster).
The first bridge on the site was designed in 1807–10 by John Rennie for the Strand Bridge of Life and opened in 1817 as a toll bridge.

Dundas Aqueduct

Dundas
The Kennet and Avon Canal — including the Dundas Aqueduct, Caen Hill Locks and Crofton Pumping Station — occupied him between 1794 and 1810.
It was designed by John Rennie and chief engineer John Thomas between 1797 and 1801, and completed in 1805.

Andrew Meikle

He showed a taste for mechanics at a very early age, and was allowed to spend much time in the workshop of Andrew Meikle, a millwright and the inventor of the threshing machine, who lived at Houston Mill on the Phantassie estate.
Meikle worked as a millwright at Houston Mill in East Linton, East Lothian, and inspired John Rennie to become a noted civil engineer.

River Witham

WithamWitham ValleyRiver Haven
For many years he was engaged in extensive drainage operations in the Lincolnshire and Norfolk fens (1802–1810), and in the improvement of the River Witham.
It used to rejoin the main channel at Stamp End, but was re-routed into the South Delph, a drainage ditch constructed by John Rennie in the early 19th century that joins the main channel below Bardney lock.

Southwark Bridge

Southwark
Southwark Bridge (1815–1819) was built as three cast-iron spans over the river.
A previous bridge, designed by John Rennie, opened on the site in 1819 and was originally known as Queen Street Bridge, as shown on the 1818 John Snow Map of London.

East Linton

PrestonkirkLintonLintonbriggs
He was born the younger son of James Rennie, a farmer near Phantassie, near East Linton, East Lothian, Scotland.

Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation

Blackwater CanalChelmerChelmer & Blackwater Navigation
His early projects included the Lancaster Canal (started 1792), the Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation (1793), the Crinan Canal (1794-1801), Rudyard Lake (1797) and the Rochdale Canal, which passes through difficult country between Rochdale and Todmorden (1799).
Under the direction of John Rennie Charles Wedge surveyed the route in 1792 and Matthew Hall surveyed it in 1793.

Caen Hill Locks

Caen Hill FlightCaen HillCaen Hill flight of locks
The Kennet and Avon Canal — including the Dundas Aqueduct, Caen Hill Locks and Crofton Pumping Station — occupied him between 1794 and 1810.
This flight of locks was engineer John Rennie's solution to climbing the steep hill, and was the last part of the 87 mi route of the canal to be completed.

Vauxhall Bridge

Regent's BridgeOld Vauxhall BridgeVauxhall
He also designed the Old Vauxhall Bridge.
John Rennie was commissioned to design and build the new bridge, and a stone bridge of seven arches was approved.

Chatham Dockyard

ChathamChatham Royal DockyardHM Dockyard, Chatham
Rennie was also responsible for designing and building docks at Hull, Liverpool, Greenock, London (London, East India and West India docks), and Leith and improving the harbours and dockyards at Chatham, Devonport, Portsmouth, Holyhead, Ramsgate, Sheerness, Howth and Dunleary.
Following the appointment of Robert Seppings as Master Shipwright in 1804, iron began to be introduced into the structure of ships being built at Chatham; the following year work began on a new, much larger smithery, commissioned by Samuel Bentham, designed by Edward Holl and fitted out by John Rennie.

West India Docks

West India Dock CompanyWest India DockBlackwall Basin
Rennie was also responsible for designing and building docks at Hull, Liverpool, Greenock, London (London, East India and West India docks), and Leith and improving the harbours and dockyards at Chatham, Devonport, Portsmouth, Holyhead, Ramsgate, Sheerness, Howth and Dunleary.
The two northern docks were constructed between 1800 and 1802 (officially opened on 27 August 1802) for the West India Dock Company to a design by leading civil engineer William Jessop (John Rennie was a consultant, and Thomas Morris, Liverpool's third dock engineer, was also involved; Ralph Walker was appointed resident engineer), and were the first commercial wet docks in London.

Sheerness Dockyard

SheernessSheerness Royal DockyardGun Wharf, Sheerness
Rennie was also responsible for designing and building docks at Hull, Liverpool, Greenock, London (London, East India and West India docks), and Leith and improving the harbours and dockyards at Chatham, Devonport, Portsmouth, Holyhead, Ramsgate, Sheerness, Howth and Dunleary.
By 1810, designs had been submitted to the Controller of the Navy by both Samuel Bentham and John Rennie the Elder for a relatively modest rebuilding of the yard.

Prestonkirk Parish Church

Prestonkirk
After receiving a normal basic education at the parish school of Prestonkirk Parish Church, he was sent to the burgh school at Dunbar, and in November 1780 he matriculated at the University of Edinburgh, where he remained until 1783.

CHQ Building

One of John Rennie's last projects was the construction of the Custom House Docks in Dublin, along with its locks and warehouses, including the CHQ Building where he pioneered the use of cast-iron in the early 19th century.
The building was designed by the Scottish engineer John Rennie, with his son of the same name working as his principal assistant.

Millwright

millwrightsillwrightmechanic
He showed a taste for mechanics at a very early age, and was allowed to spend much time in the workshop of Andrew Meikle, a millwright and the inventor of the threshing machine, who lived at Houston Mill on the Phantassie estate.

River Great Ouse

Great OuseRiver OuseOuse
The Eau Brink Cut, a new channel for the River Ouse, was completed just before his death.

London Docks

London Dock CompanydocksLondon
Rennie was also responsible for designing and building docks at Hull, Liverpool, Greenock, London (London, East India and West India docks), and Leith and improving the harbours and dockyards at Chatham, Devonport, Portsmouth, Holyhead, Ramsgate, Sheerness, Howth and Dunleary.
The principal designers were the architects and engineers Daniel Asher Alexander and John Rennie.

John Rennie the Younger

John RennieSir John RennieJohn
Rennie's last project was London Bridge, still under construction when he died in 1821 but completed by his son, also John Rennie.
Sir John Rennie FRSA (30 August 1794 – 3 September 1874) was the second son of engineer John Rennie the Elder, and brother of George Rennie.