John Ruskin

RuskinRuskinianRuskinian GothicRuskinian modeexcrescenceControversies: Turner's Erotic DrawingsExcrescence (architecture)J RuskinJ. RuskinMr. Ruskin
John Ruskin (8 February 1819 – 20 January 1900) was the leading English art critic of the Victorian era, as well as an art patron, draughtsman, watercolourist, a prominent social thinker and philanthropist.wikipedia
1,374 Related Articles

Slade Professor of Fine Art

Slade ProfessorSlade Professorship of Fine ArtSlade Lectures
In 1869, Ruskin became the first Slade Professor of Fine Art at the University of Oxford, where he established the Ruskin School of Drawing.
The bequest was also indirectly responsible for the foundation of the Ruskin School of Drawing in Oxford, which was financed by the first Oxford Professor, John Ruskin, who announced his intention in his inaugural lecture "to the general dismay of his listeners".

Architecture

architecturalarchitectarchitecturally
He wrote on subjects as varied as geology, architecture, myth, ornithology, literature, education, botany and political economy.
The 19th-century English art critic, John Ruskin, in his Seven Lamps of Architecture, published 1849, was much narrower in his view of what constituted architecture.

Guild of St George

Guild of St. GeorgeMuseum of St. GeorgeSt George's Museum
As a result, he founded the Guild of St George, an organisation that endures today.
The Guild of St George is a charitable Education Trust, based in England but with a worldwide membership, which tries to uphold the values and put into practice the ideas of its founder, John Ruskin (1819–1900).

Lake District

English Lake DistrictLakelandLake District National Park
Family tours took them to the Lake District (his first long poem, Iteriad, was an account of his tour in 1830) and to relatives in Perth, Scotland.
A popular holiday destination, it is famous for its lakes, forests and mountains (or fells), and its associations with William Wordsworth and other Lake Poets and also with Beatrix Potter and John Ruskin.

Unto This Last

Unto This Last (1860, 1862) marked the shift in emphasis.
Unto This Last is an essay and book on economy by John Ruskin, first published between August and December 1860 in the monthly journal Cornhill Magazine in four articles.

Fors Clavigera

In 1871, he began his monthly "letters to the workmen and labourers of Great Britain", published under the title Fors Clavigera (1871–1884).
Fors Clavigera was the name given by John Ruskin to a series of letters addressed to British workmen during the 1870s.

Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood

Pre-RaphaelitePre-RaphaelitesPre-Raphaelitism
From the 1850s, he championed the Pre-Raphaelites, who were influenced by his ideas. John Everett Millais, William Holman Hunt and Dante Gabriel Rossetti had established the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848.
The group associated their work with John Ruskin, an English critic whose influences were driven by his religious background.

Modern Painters

i-D Magazine, Modern Paintersmodern painter
Ruskin first came to widespread attention with the first volume of Modern Painters (1843), an extended essay in defence of the work of J. M. W. Turner in which he argued that the principal role of the artist is "truth to nature."
Modern Painters (1843–1860) is a five-volume work by the eminent Victorian art critic, John Ruskin, begun when he was 24 years old.

Herne Hill

area of the same nameDargateHerne Hill Athletic Ground
Ruskin's childhood was spent from 1823 at 28 Herne Hill (demolished c.
(John Ruskin grew up, from the age of 4, in a house on Herne Hill).

Effie Gray

EffieEuphemia "Effie" GrayEffie (Euphemia) Gray
Before he returned, Ruskin answered a challenge set down by Effie Gray, whom he later married.
She had previously been married to the critic John Ruskin, but the marriage was annulled, and she left him without it having been consummated.

Newdigate Prize

His biggest success came in 1839 when at the third attempt he won the prestigious Newdigate Prize for poetry (Arthur Hugh Clough came second).
Notable winners have included Robert Stephen Hawker, John Ruskin, Matthew Arnold, Laurence Binyon, Oscar Wilde, John Buchan, John Addington Symonds, James Fenton, P. M. Hubbard, and Alan Hollinghurst.

The King of the Golden River

During a six-week break at Leamington Spa to undergo Dr Jephson's (1798–1878) celebrated salt-water cure, Ruskin wrote his only work of fiction, the fable, The King of the Golden River (not published until December 1850 (but imprinted 1851) with illustrations by Richard Doyle).
The King of the Golden River or The Black Brothers: A Legend of Stiria by John Ruskin was originally written in 1841 for the twelve-year-old Effie (Euphemia) Gray, whom Ruskin later married.

J. M. W. Turner

TurnerJoseph Mallord William TurnerJMW Turner
Ruskin first came to widespread attention with the first volume of Modern Painters (1843), an extended essay in defence of the work of J. M. W. Turner in which he argued that the principal role of the artist is "truth to nature." In particular, he admired deeply the accompanying illustrations by J. M. W. Turner, and much of Ruskin's art in the 1830s was in imitation of Turner, and Samuel Prout whose Sketches Made in Flanders and Germany (1833) he also admired.
He had been championed by the leading English art critic John Ruskin from 1840, and is today regarded as having elevated landscape painting to an eminence rivalling history painting.

Charles Thomas Newton

Charles NewtonSir Charles NewtonSir Charles Thomas Newton
Among Ruskin's fellow undergraduates, the most important friends were Charles Thomas Newton and Henry Acland.
Already in his undergraduate days Newton (as his friend and contemporary, John Ruskin, tells in Præterita) was giving evidence of his natural bent; the scientific study of classical archaeology, which Winckelmann had set on foot in Germany, was in England to find its worthy apostle in Newton.

Samuel Prout

Prout
In particular, he admired deeply the accompanying illustrations by J. M. W. Turner, and much of Ruskin's art in the 1830s was in imitation of Turner, and Samuel Prout whose Sketches Made in Flanders and Germany (1833) he also admired.
John Ruskin, whose work often emulated Prout's, wrote in 1844, "Sometimes I tire of Turner, but never of Prout".

Rose La Touche

In Lucca he saw the Tomb of Ilaria del Carretto by Jacopo della Quercia, which Ruskin considered the exemplar of Christian sculpture (he later associated it with the then object of his love, Rose La Touche).
Rose La Touche (1848–1875) was the pupil, cherished student, "pet", and ideal on which the English art historian John Ruskin based Sesame and Lilies (1865).

The Seven Lamps of Architecture

Seven Lamps of Architecture
Ruskin's developing interest in architecture, and particularly in the Gothic, led to the first work to bear his name, The Seven Lamps of Architecture (1849).
The Seven Lamps of Architecture is an extended essay, first published in May 1849 and written by the English art critic and theorist John Ruskin.

Watercolor painting

watercolorwatercolourwatercolors
John Ruskin (8 February 1819 – 20 January 1900) was the leading English art critic of the Victorian era, as well as an art patron, draughtsman, watercolourist, a prominent social thinker and philanthropist.
Watercolor tutorials were first published in this period by Varley, Cox, and others, establishing the step-by-step painting instructions that still characterize the genre today; The Elements of Drawing, a watercolor tutorial by English art critic John Ruskin, has been out of print only once since it was first published in 1857.

William Holman Hunt

Holman HuntW Holman HuntHunt
John Everett Millais, William Holman Hunt and Dante Gabriel Rossetti had established the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848.
These features were influenced by the writings of John Ruskin and Thomas Carlyle, according to whom the world itself should be read as a system of visual signs.

John Everett Millais

MillaisJohn MillaisSir John Everett Millais
John Everett Millais, William Holman Hunt and Dante Gabriel Rossetti had established the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848.
His wife Effie was formerly married to the critic John Ruskin, who had supported Millais's early work.

Working Men's College

The Working Men’s CollegeThe Working Men's CollegeCorporation of Working Men's Colleges
This chapter had a profound impact, and was reprinted both by the Christian socialist founders of the Working Men's College and later by the Arts and Crafts pioneer and socialist, William Morris.
Notable early promoters and supporters of the College and its foundation were Edward Vansittart Neale, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Ruskin, Charles Blachford Mansfield, John Stuart Mill, James Clerk Maxwell, and Charles Kingsley, (author of The Water-Babies), while later ones included G.M. Trevelyan, E. M. Forster, C.E.M. Joad and Seamus Heaney.

National Gallery

National Gallery, LondonThe National GalleryNational Gallery of London
He described works he had seen at the National Gallery and Dulwich Picture Gallery with extraordinary verbal felicity.
Ralph Nicholson Wornum the Gallery's Keeper and Secretary, worked with John Ruskin to bring the bequest together.

Denmark Hill

Champion Hilla leafy south London suburbDenmark
Both painters were among occasional guests of the Ruskins at Herne Hill, and 163 Denmark Hill (demolished 1947) to which the family moved in 1842.
The area is home of the Maudsley Hospital and King's College Hospital, and also of Ruskin Park, named after John Ruskin, who once lived nearby.

John Ruskin (painting)

John Ruskinpainting of John Ruskinhis portrait
Providing Millais with artistic patronage and encouragement, in the summer of 1853 the artist (and his brother) travelled to Scotland with Ruskin and Effie where, at Glenfinlas, he painted the closely observed landscape background of gneiss rock to which, as had always been intended, he later added Ruskin's portrait.
John Ruskin is a painting of the leading Victorian art critic John Ruskin (1819–1900).

Drawing

draughtsmandrawingsdraftsman
John Ruskin (8 February 1819 – 20 January 1900) was the leading English art critic of the Victorian era, as well as an art patron, draughtsman, watercolourist, a prominent social thinker and philanthropist.
Furthermore, the influential artist and art critic John Ruskin emphasised the importance of perception in the drawing process in his book The Elements of Drawing.