John Stafford Smith

SmithStafford Smith
John Stafford Smith (30 March 1750 – 21 September 1836) was a British composer, church organist, and early musicologist.wikipedia
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The Star-Spangled Banner

national anthemAmerican national anthemU.S. national anthem
Stafford Smith is best known for writing the music for "The Anacreontic Song", which became the tune for the American patriotic song "The Star-Spangled Banner" following the War of 1812, and in 1931 was adopted as the national anthem of the United States. In 1814, Francis Scott Key wrote the poem "Defence of Fort M'Henry" (later re-titled, "The Star-Spangled Banner") which was later set to the tune of "Anacreon", a piece composed by Stafford Smith.
The poem was set to the tune of a popular British song written by John Stafford Smith for the Anacreontic Society, a men's social club in London.

To Anacreon in Heaven

The Anacreontic SongTo Anacreon in Heav'n
Stafford Smith is best known for writing the music for "The Anacreontic Song", which became the tune for the American patriotic song "The Star-Spangled Banner" following the War of 1812, and in 1931 was adopted as the national anthem of the United States.
Composed by John Stafford Smith, the tune was later used by several writers as a setting for their patriotic lyrics.

Drexel 4175

Smith's library included the Old Hall Manuscript, Drexel 4175, as well as a copy of Ulm Gesangbuch from 1538 that had belonged to Johann Sebastian Bach.
John Stafford Smith suggested a date "about the year 1620" for the two songs ("Ist for a grace" and "You herralds of Mrs hart") he printed in his compilation Musica Antiqua.

National anthem

anthemnational songstate anthem
Stafford Smith is best known for writing the music for "The Anacreontic Song", which became the tune for the American patriotic song "The Star-Spangled Banner" following the War of 1812, and in 1931 was adopted as the national anthem of the United States.
Most of the best-known national anthems were written by little-known or unknown composers such as Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle, composer of "La Marseillaise" and John Stafford Smith who wrote the tune for "The Anacreontic Song", which became the tune for the U.S. national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner".

Anacreontic Society

He was elected as a member of the select Anacreontic Society which boasted amongst its membership such persons as Samuel Johnson, James Boswell and Sir Joshua Reynolds.
John Stafford Smith wrote the tune.

Francis Scott Key

KeyF. Scott KeyF.S. Key
In 1814, Francis Scott Key wrote the poem "Defence of Fort M'Henry" (later re-titled, "The Star-Spangled Banner") which was later set to the tune of "Anacreon", a piece composed by Stafford Smith.
He took it to Thomas Carr, a music publisher, who adapted it to the rhythms of composer John Stafford Smith's "To Anacreon in Heaven", a popular tune Key had already used as a setting for his 1805-song "When the Warrior Returns", celebrating U.S. heroes of the First Barbary War.

King's School, Gloucester

The King's SchoolGloucestercathedral school (King's School)
He attended the Gloucester cathedral school, where he became a boy-singer.
John Stafford Smith: late 18th century; wrote the tune for "To Anacreon in Heaven". In 1814 Francis Scott Key would set his poem to this piece and was named Star Spangled Banner, the National Anthem of the United States.

John Smith

John Stafford Smith (1750–1836), composer of the tune for "The Star-Spangled Banner"

The Carnegie Hall Concerts: January 1943

The Duke Ellington Carnegie Hall Concerts: January 1943
1) "The Star Spangled Banner" (Francis Scott Key, John Stafford Smith) - 1:12

The Mulliner Book

Mulliner Book
The provenance of the MS is unknown before it appears in the library of John Stafford Smith in 1776.

Hear My Music

3) "Ezy Ryder/Star Spangled Banner" (Hendrix/Francis Scott Key, John Stafford Smith) – 10:17

Jimi Plays Berkeley (soundtrack)

Musique Originale du Film Jimi Plays Berkeley
3) "Star Spangled Banner" (Francis Scott Key, John Stafford Smith)

Drexel 4180–4185

Drexel
He views John Stafford Smith as the likely candidate since his father, Martin Smith, was organist at Gloucester Cathedral from 1739 to 1781.

Star-Spangled Banner (flag)

Star-Spangled BannerAmerican flaggarrison flag
Seeing the flag during the battle inspired Francis Scott Key to write the poem "Defence of Fort M'Henry", which, retitled with the flag's name from the closing lines of the first stanza and set to the tune of "To Anacreon in Heaven" by John Stafford Smith, later became the national anthem of the United States.

1778 in music

1778
August 1 – First publication (in London) of the song "To Anacreon in Heaven" with words by Ralph Tomlinson (d. March 17). Date of writing and first publication of the music by John Stafford Smith which becomes "The Star-Spangled Banner" is uncertain but probably about this time.

John Goss (composer)

John GossSir John Goss
The master of the choir at that time was John Stafford Smith, a musician known for composing the song To Anacreon in Heaven, later used as the tune of the American national anthem.

History of Baltimore

BaltimoreBaltimore Towncity of Baltimore
Key's poem was set to a 1780 drinking song by British composer John Stafford Smith, and "The Star-Spangled Banner" became the official national anthem of the United States in 1931.

Seminar (album)

SeminarBeepersSeminar'' (album)
Track 3 contants elements from "The Star-Spangled Banner" by Francis Scott Key & John Stafford Smith (1814)

Drexel 5856

The earliest known owner of Drexel 5856 was the composer John Stafford Smith, who also was as an antiquarian and collector of manuscripts.

American Spirit (album)

American SpiritAmerican Spirit'' (album)
1) "Star Spangled Banner" (Francis Scott Key, John Stafford Smith) – 2:41

March 30

30 March30
1750 – John Stafford Smith, English organist and composer (d. 1836)

English Americans

EnglishAnglo-AmericanAnglo-Americans
American national anthem - takes its melody from the 18th-century English song "To Anacreon in Heaven" written by John Stafford Smith from England for the Anacreontic Society, a men's social club in London and lyrics written by Francis Scott Key of English descent. This became a well-known and recognized patriotic song throughout the United States, which was officially designated as the U.S. national anthem in 1931.

Live Phish Volume 15

1996Live Phish 15Volume 15
5) "The Star-Spangled Banner" (Key, Smith) – 1:33