John Stuart Mill

MillJ.S. MillJ. S. MillJS Millgreatest happiness principleStuart MillJ S MillMill, John StuartMillsianJ. Stuart Mill
John Stuart Mill (20 May 1806 – 7 May 1873), usually cited as '''J.wikipedia
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Auguste Comte

ComteComteanAuguste Compte
He contributed to the investigation of scientific methodology, though his knowledge of the topic was based on the writings of others, notably William Whewell, John Herschel, and Auguste Comte, and research carried out for Mill by Alexander Bain.
Comte was a major influence on 19th-century thought, influencing the work of social thinkers such as Karl Marx, John Stuart Mill, and George Eliot.

Jeremy Bentham

BenthamBenthamiteBentham, Jeremy
Mill was a proponent of utilitarianism, an ethical theory developed by his predecessor Jeremy Bentham. John Stuart was educated by his father, with the advice and assistance of Jeremy Bentham and Francis Place.
Bentham's students included his secretary and collaborator James Mill, the latter's son, John Stuart Mill, the legal philosopher John Austin, as well as Robert Owen, one of the founders of utopian socialism.

Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
A member of the Liberal Party, he was also the second Member of Parliament to call for women's suffrage after Henry Hunt in 1832.
Prominent intellectuals associated with the Liberal Party include the philosopher John Stuart Mill, the economist John Maynard Keynes and social planner William Beveridge.

James Mill

JamesMillMill, James
John Stuart Mill was born at 13 Rodney Street in Pentonville, Middlesex, the eldest son of the Scottish philosopher, historian and economist James Mill, and Harriet Barrow.
His son, John Stuart Mill, was also a noted philosopher of liberalism, utilitarianism and the civilizing mission of the British Empire.

Political economy

political economistpolitical economicspolitical economists
One of the most influential thinkers in the history of classical liberalism, he contributed widely to social theory, political theory, and political economy. In the following year he was introduced to political economy and studied Adam Smith and David Ricardo with his father, ultimately completing their classical economic view of factors of production.
Leading on from this, the French physiocrats were the first major exponents of political economy, although the intellectual responses of Adam Smith, John Stuart Mill, David Ricardo, Henry George and Karl Marx to the physiocrats generally receives much greater attention.

Alexander Bain

BainA Bain
He contributed to the investigation of scientific methodology, though his knowledge of the topic was based on the writings of others, notably William Whewell, John Herschel, and Auguste Comte, and research carried out for Mill by Alexander Bain.
This was the beginning of his connection with John Stuart Mill, which led to a lifelong friendship.

Classical economics

classical economistsclassicalclassical economist
In the following year he was introduced to political economy and studied Adam Smith and David Ricardo with his father, ultimately completing their classical economic view of factors of production.
Its main thinkers are held to be Adam Smith, Jean-Baptiste Say, David Ricardo, Thomas Robert Malthus, and John Stuart Mill.

Francis Place

John Stuart was educated by his father, with the advice and assistance of Jeremy Bentham and Francis Place.
In 1807 he supported Sir Francis Burdett, 5th Baronet, a Parliamentary candidate for Westminster, which allowed him to come into contact with such theorists as William Godwin, James Mill, Robert Owen, Jeremy Bentham, Joseph Hume and John Stuart Mill.

Henri de Saint-Simon

Saint-SimonClaude Henri de Rouvroy, comte de Saint-SimonComte de Saint-Simon
There he met many leaders of the Liberal party, as well as other notable Parisians, including Henri Saint-Simon.
Saint Simon's conceptual recognition of broad socio-economic contribution, and his Enlightenment valorization of scientific knowledge, soon inspired and influenced utopian socialism, liberal political theorist John Stuart Mill, anarchism through its founder Pierre-Joseph Proudhon who was inspired by Saint-Simon's thought and Marxism with Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels identifying Saint-Simon as an inspiration to their ideas and classifying him among the utopian socialists.

Pentonville

Henry Penton
John Stuart Mill was born at 13 Rodney Street in Pentonville, Middlesex, the eldest son of the Scottish philosopher, historian and economist James Mill, and Harriet Barrow.
Pentonville is the birthplace of John Stuart Mill (1806) and Forbes Benignus Winslow (1810), the noted psychiatrist.

William Whewell

WhewellDr. WhewellMr W. Whewell
He contributed to the investigation of scientific methodology, though his knowledge of the topic was based on the writings of others, notably William Whewell, John Herschel, and Auguste Comte, and research carried out for Mill by Alexander Bain.
Following Immanuel Kant, he asserted against John Stuart Mill the a priori nature of necessary truth, and by his rules for the construction of conceptions he dispensed with the inductive methods of Mill.

Social theory

social theoristsocial theoriessocial analysis
One of the most influential thinkers in the history of classical liberalism, he contributed widely to social theory, political theory, and political economy.
The 19th century pioneers of social theory and sociology, like Saint-Simon, Comte, Marx, John Stuart Mill or Spencer, never held university posts and they were broadly regarded as philosophers.

On Liberty

tyranny of the majority
In On Liberty, A Few Words on Non-Intervention, and other works, Mill defended British imperialism by arguing that a fundamental distinction existed between civilized and barbarous peoples.
On Liberty is a philosophical essay by the English philosopher John Stuart Mill.

Westminster (UK Parliament constituency)

WestminsterWestminster (seat 1/2)City of Westminster
During the same period, 1865–68, he was a Member of Parliament for City and Westminster.
The constituency's most famous former representatives are John Stuart Mill and Charles James Fox.

Associationism

associationistassociationist psychologyAssociationist school
His father, a follower of Bentham and an adherent of associationism, had as his explicit aim to create a genius intellect that would carry on the cause of utilitarianism and its implementation after he and Bentham had died.
Members of the "Associationist School", including John Locke, David Hume, David Hartley, Joseph Priestley, James Mill, John Stuart Mill, Alexander Bain, and Ivan Pavlov, asserted that the principle applied to all or most mental processes.

Proportional representation

proportional representation systemproportionalproportional voting
In Considerations on Representative Government, Mill called for various reforms of Parliament and voting, especially proportional representation, the single transferable vote, and the extension of suffrage.
The case for proportional representation was made by John Stuart Mill in his 1861 essay Considerations on Representative Government:

Classical liberalism

classical liberalliberalclassical liberals
One of the most influential thinkers in the history of classical liberalism, he contributed widely to social theory, political theory, and political economy.
Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations, published in 1776, was to provide most of the ideas of economics, at least until the publication of John Stuart Mill's Principles of Political Economy in 1848.

Harriet Taylor Mill

Harriet TaylorHarriet Mill
In 1851, Mill married Harriet Taylor after 21 years of intimate friendship.
She was married to John Stuart Mill, one of the pre-eminent thinkers of the 19th century.

Bertrand Russell

RussellRussell, BertrandBertrand Russel
He was godfather to the philosopher Bertrand Russell.
Lord Amberley was an atheist and his atheism was evident when he asked the philosopher John Stuart Mill to act as Russell's secular godfather.

Philosophy of science

philosopher of sciencephilosophers of sciencephilosophy
Comte's sociologie was more an early philosophy of science than we perhaps know it today, and the positive philosophy aided in Mill's broad rejection of Benthamism.
The 19th century writings of John Stuart Mill are also considered important in the formation of current conceptions of the scientific method, as well as anticipating later accounts of scientific explanation.

Women's suffrage

suffragistfemale suffragesuffrage movement
A member of the Liberal Party, he was also the second Member of Parliament to call for women's suffrage after Henry Hunt in 1832.
John Stuart Mill, elected to Parliament in 1865 and an open advocate of female suffrage (about to publish The Subjection of Women), campaigned for an amendment to the Reform Act 1832 to include female suffrage.

Political philosophy

political theorypolitical philosopherpolitical theorist
One of the most influential thinkers in the history of classical liberalism, he contributed widely to social theory, political theory, and political economy.

Considerations on Representative Government

Pagmumunimuni tungkol sa pangkinatawang pamahalaan ni J.S. MillRepresentative government
In Considerations on Representative Government, Mill called for various reforms of Parliament and voting, especially proportional representation, the single transferable vote, and the extension of suffrage.
Considerations on Representative Government is a book by John Stuart Mill published in 1861.

John Austin (legal philosopher)

John AustinAustinianAustin
Instead he followed his father to work for the East India Company, and attended University College, London, to hear the lectures of John Austin, the first Professor of Jurisprudence.
In 1819, Austin married Sarah Taylor and became neighbours and close friends with Jeremy Bentham and James and John Stuart Mill.

Tyranny of the majority

majoritydictatorship of the majorityparliamentary dictator
He introduced a number of different concepts of the form tyranny can take, referred to as social tyranny, and tyranny of the majority.
This results in oppression of minority groups comparable to that of a tyrant or despot, argued John Stuart Mill in his 1859 book On Liberty.