John Tyler

TylerPresident TylerJohn Tyler, Jr.President John TylerDeath of John Tylera presidentElizabeth Tyler (1823–1850)Johnpro-TylerTyler Administration
John Tyler (March 29, 1790 – January 18, 1862) was the tenth president of the United States from 1841 to 1845 after briefly serving as the tenth vice president in 1841; he was elected to the latter office on the 1840 Whig ticket with President William Henry Harrison.wikipedia
919 Related Articles

Charles City County, Virginia

Charles City CountyCharles CityCharles City and New Kent
John Tyler was born on March 29, 1790; like his future running mate, William Henry Harrison, Tyler hailed from Charles City County, Virginia and was descended from aristocratic and politically entrenched families of English ancestry.
Notable natives include the 9th and 10th Presidents of the United States, William Henry Harrison and John Tyler.

John Tyler Sr.

John Tyler, Sr.John TylerTyler, John Sr.
John Tyler Sr., commonly known as Judge Tyler, was a friend and college roommate of Thomas Jefferson and served in the Virginia House of Delegates alongside Benjamin Harrison V, father of William.
John Tyler Sr. (February 28, 1747 – January 6, 1813) was a Virginia planter, 15th Governor of Virginia, United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Virginia and the father of President John Tyler.

United States Attorney General

Attorney GeneralU.S. Attorney GeneralAttorney General of the United States
After graduation Tyler read the law with his father, a state judge at the time, and later with Edmund Randolph, former United States Attorney General.

Virginia Constitutional Convention of 1829–1830

Virginia Constitutional Convention of 1829-1830Virginia Constitutional ConventionConstitutional Convention
In 1829, Tyler was elected as a delegate to the Virginia Constitutional Convention of 1829-1830 from the Senate District that included Chief Justice John Marshall.

23rd United States Congress

Twenty-third23rdTwenty-third Congress
On March 3, 1835, with only hours remaining in the congressional session, the Whigs voted Tyler President pro tempore of the Senate as a symbolic gesture of approval.

Daniel Webster

WebsterDan'l WebsterAmerican politician of the same name
Instead, Whigs in various regions put forth their own preferred tickets, reflecting the party's tenuous coalition: the Massachusetts Whigs nominated Daniel Webster and Francis Granger, the Anti-Masons of the Northern and border states backed William Henry Harrison and Granger, and the states' rights advocates of the middle and lower South nominated Hugh Lawson White and John Tyler.
Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was an American statesman who represented New Hampshire and Massachusetts in the United States Congress and served as the United States Secretary of State under Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore.

20th United States Congress

Twentieth20thTwentieth Congress
When the Twentieth Congress began in December 1827, Tyler served alongside his Virginia colleague and friend Littleton Waller Tazewell, who shared his strict constructionist views and uneasy support of Jackson.

Constitution of Virginia

Virginia ConstitutionVirginia State ConstitutionConstitution
The office of governor was powerless under the original Virginia Constitution (1776–1830), lacking even veto authority.
Delegates to the convention included such prominent Virginians as James Madison, James Monroe, John Tyler, and John Marshall.

Whig Party (United States)

WhigWhig PartyWhigs
John Tyler (March 29, 1790 – January 18, 1862) was the tenth president of the United States from 1841 to 1845 after briefly serving as the tenth vice president in 1841; he was elected to the latter office on the 1840 Whig ticket with President William Henry Harrison.
Harrison's successor, John Tyler, was expelled from the party in 1841 after clashing with Clay and other Whig Party leaders over economic policies such as the re-establishment of a national bank.

22nd United States Congress

Twenty-second22ndTwenty-second Congress
Tyler's uneasy relationship with his party came to a head during the 22nd Congress, as the Nullification Crisis of 1832–33 began.

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

HarrisburgHarrisburg, PAHarrisburg, Pa.
When the 1839 Whig National Convention convened in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania to choose the party's ticket, the United States was in the third year of a serious recession following the Panic of 1837.
In 1839, Harrison and Tyler were nominated for President of the United States at the first national convention of the Whig Party of the United States, which was held in Harrisburg.

Woodburn (Charles City, Virginia)

Woodburn plantation
In 1813 he purchased Woodburn plantation, and resided there until 1821.
The house was built about 1815 by John Tyler, who later served as tenth President of the United States.

1836 United States presidential election

18361836 presidential election1836 election
While Tyler wished to attend to his private life and family, he was soon occupied with the presidential election of 1836. He had been suggested as a vice presidential candidate since early 1835, and the same day the Virginia Democrats issued the expunging instruction, the Virginia Whigs nominated him as their candidate.
The Whigs ended up with two main tickets: William Henry Harrison for president and Francis Granger for vice-president in the North and the border states, and Hugh Lawson White for president and John Tyler for vice-president in the middle and lower South.

1840 United States presidential election

18401840 presidential election1840 election
John Tyler (March 29, 1790 – January 18, 1862) was the tenth president of the United States from 1841 to 1845 after briefly serving as the tenth vice president in 1841; he was elected to the latter office on the 1840 Whig ticket with President William Henry Harrison.
Referencing vice presidential nominee John Tyler and Harrison's participation in the Battle of Tippecanoe, the Whigs campaigned on the slogan of "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too."

1839 Whig National Convention

Whig National Conventionnational convention1839
When the 1839 Whig National Convention convened in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania to choose the party's ticket, the United States was in the third year of a serious recession following the Panic of 1837.
The convention nominated former Senator William Henry Harrison of Ohio for president and former Senator John Tyler of Virginia for vice president.

Andrew Jackson

JacksonJacksonianPresident Andrew Jackson
He was initially a Democrat, but opposed Andrew Jackson during the Nullification Crisis, seeing Jackson's actions as infringing upon states' rights, and criticized Jackson's expansion of executive power during the Bank War.
Calhoun, Clay, and several others marched out of the chamber in opposition, the only dissenting vote coming from John Tyler of Virginia.

Webster–Ashburton Treaty

Webster-Ashburton TreatyMaine border disputenorth-eastern boundary dispute
Although he faced a stalemate on domestic policy, he had several foreign-policy achievements, including the Webster–Ashburton Treaty with Britain and the Treaty of Wanghia with Qing China.
Signed under John Tyler's presidency, it resolved the Aroostook War, a nonviolent dispute over the location of the Maine–New Brunswick border.

28th United States Congress

Twenty-eighth28thTwenty-eighth Congress
The Whigs were unable to pursue further impeachment proceedings in the subsequent 28th Congress—in the elections of 1842 they retained a majority in the Senate but lost control of the House.
It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1843, to March 4, 1845, during the third and fourth years of John Tyler's presidency.

Tippecanoe and Tyler Too

TippecanoeTippecanoe andTippecanoe and Tyler, Too
The presidential candidate's military service was emphasized, thus the well known campaign jingle, "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too", referring to Harrison's victory at the Battle of Tippecanoe.
Its lyrics sang the praises of Whig candidates William Henry Harrison (the "hero of Tippecanoe") and John Tyler, while denigrating incumbent Democrat Martin Van Buren.

John Clopton

The death of U.S. Representative John Clopton in September 1816 created a vacancy in Virginia's 23rd congressional district.
Future President John Tyler was elected to fill the vacancy caused by Clopton's death.

John Canfield Spencer

John C. SpencerJohn SpencerJ. C. Spencer
However, the Senate successively voted against confirming John C. Spencer, Reuben Walworth, Edward King and John M. Read (Walworth was rejected three times, King rejected twice).
John Canfield Spencer (January 8, 1788 – May 17, 1855) was an American lawyer, politician, judge and United States Cabinet secretary in the administration of President John Tyler.

Thaddeus Stevens

Thad StevensU.S. Representative Stevens
Many Northern Whigs opposed Clay, and some, including Pennsylvania's Thaddeus Stevens, showed the Virginians a letter written by Scott in which he apparently displayed abolitionist sentiments.
Though Stevens later alleged that Harrison had promised him a Cabinet position if elected, he received none, and any influence ended when Harrison died after a month in office, to be succeeded by John Tyler, a southerner hostile to Stevens's stances on slavery.

Abel P. Upshur

Abel Parker UpshurAbel Upshur
Tyler appointed Abel P. Upshur, a popular Secretary of the Navy and close adviser, as his new Secretary of State, and nominated Gilmer to fill Upshur's former office.
Active in Virginia state politics for decades, with a brother and a nephew who became distinguished U.S. Navy officers, Judge Upshur left the Virginia bench to become the Secretary of the Navy and Secretary of State during the administration of President John Tyler, a fellow Virginian.

John J. Crittenden

John Jordan CrittendenJohn CrittendenCrittenden
He represented the state in both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate and twice served as United States Attorney General in the administrations of William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore.

Virginia's 23rd congressional district

23rd
The death of U.S. Representative John Clopton in September 1816 created a vacancy in Virginia's 23rd congressional district.