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The Relapse

The Relapse, or Virtue in DangerVirtue in DangerRelapse
He wrote two argumentative and outspoken Restoration comedies, The Relapse (1696) and The Provoked Wife (1697), which have become enduring stage favourites but originally occasioned much controversy.
The Relapse, or, Virtue in Danger is a Restoration comedy from 1696 written by John Vanbrugh.

The Provoked Wife

The Provok'd Wife 'The Provok'd Wife
He wrote two argumentative and outspoken Restoration comedies, The Relapse (1696) and The Provoked Wife (1697), which have become enduring stage favourites but originally occasioned much controversy.
The Provoked Wife (1697) is the second original comedy written by John Vanbrugh.

Blenheim Palace

BlenheimBlenheim EstateBlenheim Great Park
Sir John Vanbrugh (24 January 1664 (baptised) – 26 March 1726) was an English architect and dramatist, perhaps best known as the designer of Blenheim Palace and Castle Howard.
The project soon became the subject of political infighting, with the Crown cancelling further financial support in 1712, Marlborough's three-year voluntary exile to the Continent, the fall from influence of his duchy and lasting damage to the reputation of the architect Sir John Vanbrugh.

Castle Howard

Castle Howard EstatesHenderskelfeHenderskelfe Castle
Sir John Vanbrugh (24 January 1664 (baptised) – 26 March 1726) was an English architect and dramatist, perhaps best known as the designer of Blenheim Palace and Castle Howard. The 3rd Earl of Carlisle (1669–1738) of Castle Howard. Carlisle's grandmother, Lady Anne Howard, Countess of Carlisle, was first cousin to the 3rd Earl of Berkshire
Building of Castle Howard began in 1699 and took over 100 years to complete to a design by Sir John Vanbrugh for the 3rd Earl of Carlisle.

Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage

hysterical attacks on theatres
He was attacked on both counts, and was one of the prime targets of Jeremy Collier's Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage.
In March 1698, Jeremy Collier published his anti-theatre pamphlet, A Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage; in the pamphlet, Collier attacks a number of playwrights: William Wycherley, John Dryden, William Congreve, John Vanbrugh, and Thomas D’Urfey.

Philip Vanbrugh

PhilipCommodore Philip VanbrughMartha Goldsworthy
Vanbrugh's younger brothers, Charles MP and Philip, Governor of Newfoundland Colony, were naval commanders.
Vanbrugh's brothers included Captain Charles Vanbrugh RN MP and Sir John Vanbrugh, architect and dramatist.

Restoration comedy

Restoration comediesRestorationRestoration Drama
He wrote two argumentative and outspoken Restoration comedies, The Relapse (1696) and The Provoked Wife (1697), which have become enduring stage favourites but originally occasioned much controversy.
During the second wave of Restoration comedy in the 1690s, the "softer" comedies of William Congreve and John Vanbrugh reflected mutating cultural perceptions and great social change.

Jeremy Collier

He was attacked on both counts, and was one of the prime targets of Jeremy Collier's Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage.
In the history of English drama, Collier is known for his anti-theatrical attack on the comedy of the 1690s in his Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage (1698), which draws for its ammunition mostly on the plays of William Congreve, John Vanbrugh, John Dryden, and Thomas D'Urfey.

Dudley Carleton (diplomat)

Sir Dudley CarletonDudley Carleton
Born in London and baptised on 24 January 1664, Vanbrugh was the fourth child (of 19), and eldest surviving son, of Giles Vanbrugh, a London cloth-merchant of Flemish-Protestant background (as evident in the name, contracted from "Van Brugh"), and his wife Elizabeth, widow of Thomas Barker (by whom Vanbrugh's mother had the first of her twenty children, Vanbrugh's elder half-sister, Elizabeth), and daughter of Sir Dudley Carleton, of Imber Court, Thames Ditton, Surrey.
Sir John Vanbrugh (1664–1726) and his brother

English Baroque

BaroqueEnglishEnglish baroque architecture
In his architectural career, he created what came to be known as English Baroque.
The culmination of Baroque architectural forms comes with Sir John Vanbrugh and Nicholas Hawksmoor.

Vanbrugh Castle

castle" in Greenwich
His married life, however, was mostly spent at Greenwich (then not considered part of London at all) in the house on Maze Hill now known as Vanbrugh Castle, a miniature Scottish tower house designed by Vanbrugh in the earliest stages of his career.
Vanbrugh Castle is a house designed and built by John Vanbrugh for his own family, located on Maze Hill on the eastern edge of Greenwich Park in London, to the north of Blackheath, with views to the west past the Old Royal Naval College at Greenwich down to the Thames reaching as far as the Houses of Parliament.

Goose-Pie House

goose pie
Vanbrugh died "of an asthma" on 26 March 1726, in the modest town house designed by him in 1703 out of the ruins of Whitehall Palace and satirised by Swift as "the goose pie".
Goose-Pie House was a small English Baroque house built by John Vanbrugh in Whitehall, London, in 1701.

Kit-Cat Club

Kit-cat portraitKit-Katspolitical club similarly named
A committed Whig, Vanbrugh was a member of the Kit-Cat Club – and particularly popular for "his colossal geniality, his great good humour, his easy-going temperament".
Amongst the club's membership were writers such as William Congreve, John Locke, Sir John Vanbrugh, and Joseph Addison, and politicians including Duke of Somerset, the Earl of Burlington, Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, The Earl of Stanhope, Viscount Cobham, Abraham Stanyan and Sir Robert Walpole.

Fop

foppishclotheshorseclothes horse
Unlike that of the rake heroes and fops of his plays, Vanbrugh's personal life was without scandal.
Fop characters appear in many Restoration comedies, including sir Fopling Flutter in George Etherege's The Man of Mode, or Sir Fopling Flutter (1676), Aphra Behn's diatribe against politic marriages, The Town Fop (1676, published 1677), and Lord Foppington in The Relapse (1696) by John Vanbrugh.

Kerry Downes

The architectural historian Kerry Downes is sceptical of earlier historians' claims of a lower middle-class background, and writes that a 19th-century suggestion that Giles Vanbrugh was a sugar-baker has been misunderstood.
1661–1736), Sir John Vanbrugh (1664–1726) and Sir Christopher Wren (1632–1723), and the Flemish painter Sir Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640).

Nicholas Hawksmoor

HawksmoorHawksmoor.
His inexperience was compensated for by his unerring eye for perspective and detail and his close working relationship with Nicholas Hawksmoor.
Hawksmoor worked alongside the principal architects of the time, Christopher Wren and John Vanbrugh, and contributed to the design of some of the most notable buildings of the period, including St Paul's Cathedral, Wren's City of London churches, Blenheim Palace and Castle Howard.

Charles Howard, 3rd Earl of Carlisle

The Earl of CarlisleEarl of CarlisleThe 3rd Earl of Carlisle
The 3rd Earl of Carlisle (1669–1738) of Castle Howard. Carlisle's grandmother, Lady Anne Howard, Countess of Carlisle, was first cousin to the 3rd Earl of Berkshire
In 1699 he commissioned a new Baroque mansion, Castle Howard, in Yorkshire, England to the design of Sir John Vanbrugh which is still occupied by his descendants.

Kings Weston House

Kings WestonKingsweston estatePenpole Lodge
3) Kings Weston House, begun in 1712;
It was built between 1712 and 1719 was designed by Sir John Vanbrugh for Edward Southwell on the site of an earlier Tudor house, remodelled 1763–1768 by Robert Mylne and again between 1845 and 1850 by Thomas Hopper.

Chester

City of ChesterChester, EnglandDeva
He grew up in Chester, where his family had been driven by either the major outbreak of the plague in London in 1665, or the Great Fire of 1666.
Sir John Vanbrugh (1664–1726), architect and dramatist, raised in Chester

Leigh Hunt

HuntLeighHenry L. Hunt
Downes' example of one sugar baker's house in Liverpool, estimated to bring in £40,000 a year in trade from Barbados, throws a new light on Vanbrugh's social background, one rather different from the picture of a backstreet Chester sweetshop as painted by Leigh Hunt in 1840 and reflected in many later accounts.
In 1840 he wrote introductory notices to the work of Sheridan and to Edward Moxon's edition of the works of William Wycherley, William Congreve, John Vanbrugh and George Farquhar, a work which furnished the occasion of Macaulay's essay on the Dramatists of the Restoration.

Heslington Hall

In 1719, at St Lawrence Church, York, Vanbrugh married Henrietta Maria Yarburgh of Heslington Hall, York, aged 26 to his 55. In spite of the age difference, this was by all accounts a happy marriage, which produced two sons.
In 1719 Henrietta Yarburgh, 26, married playwright Sir John Vanbrugh at St. Lawrence Parish Church (then the parish church of half of Heslington, including the Hall).

Seaton Delaval Hall

Seaton DelavalSeaton Delavel
4) Seaton Delaval Hall, begun in 1718.
Located between Seaton Sluice and Seaton Delaval, it was designed by Sir John Vanbrugh in 1718 for Admiral George Delaval; it is now owned by the National Trust.

Clarenceux King of Arms

ClarenceuxClarenceauxClarenceux Herald
This appointment was followed by a promotion to the post of Clarenceux King of Arms in March 1704.

Richard Temple, 1st Viscount Cobham

Lord CobhamSir Richard TempleRichard Temple
The Club is best known today as an early 18th-century social gathering point for culturally and politically prominent Whigs, including many artists and writers (William Congreve, Joseph Addison, Godfrey Kneller) and politicians (the Duke of Marlborough, Charles Seymour, the Earl of Burlington, Thomas Pelham-Holles, Sir Robert Walpole and Richard Temple, 1st Viscount Cobham who gave Vanbrugh several architectural commissions at Stowe).
From 1711, he made dramatic changes to his family estate at Stowe; the work was carried out under the guidance of John Vanbrugh, a skilled architect, and the future royal gardener, Charles Bridgeman.

St Lawrence's Church, York

St LawrenceSt Lawrence Church, YorkSt Lawrence Parish Church
In 1719, at St Lawrence Church, York, Vanbrugh married Henrietta Maria Yarburgh of Heslington Hall, York, aged 26 to his 55. In spite of the age difference, this was by all accounts a happy marriage, which produced two sons.
Sir John Vanbrugh married Henrietta Maria Yarburgh here on a snowy day in 1719.