John Wentworth (lieutenant governor, born 1671)

John WentworthJohn Wentworth (Lieutenant-Governor)John Wentworth (elder)Wentworth
John Wentworth (January 16, 1671 – December 12, 1730) served as Lieutenant Governor for the Province of New Hampshire from 1717 to 1730.wikipedia
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William Wentworth (elder)

William Wentworth
He was a grandson of "Elder" William Wentworth (born at Alford, Lincolnshire, England, in 1615; died in Dover, New Hampshire, March 16, 1697), an early settler in New England.
His grandson John Wentworth was the Lieutenant Governor of the Province of New Hampshire at a time when the governor was also the governor of Massachusetts.

Benning Wentworth

Governor Benning WentworthGovernor WentworthW--ntw--th
Benning Wentworth was later the first directly appointed royal governor of New Hampshire.
The eldest child of Lieutenant Governor John Wentworth, he was a great-grandson of "Elder" William Wentworth.

Sir John Wentworth, 1st Baronet

John WentworthSir John WentworthJohn Wentworth (governor)
Mark's son in his turn would also become the last royal governor, John Wentworth.
His ancestry went back to some of the earliest settlers of the Province of New Hampshire, and he was grandson of John Wentworth, who served as the province's lieutenant governor in the 1720s, a nephew to Governor Benning Wentworth, and a descendant of "Elder" William Wentworth.

Samuel Shute

Colonel Shute
Then in January 1723, Governor Samuel Shute abruptly returned to England, so Wentworth took over in New Hampshire, governing until the arrival of Shute's replacement, William Burnet, in 1728.
Vaughan was afterward formally replaced as lieutenant governor by John Wentworth.

Jonathan Belcher

BelcherGov. Jonathan BelcherGovernor Belcher
He continued as Lt. Governor until his death in 1730, again governing between Burnet's death in 1729 and the arrival of Jonathan Belcher in 1730.
He learned that Lieutenant Governor John Wentworth had offered his support to Samuel Shute when the governorship became available, and consequently turned on the entire Wentworth clan in retaliation.

William Burnet (colonial administrator)

William BurnetWilliam BurnettGovernor Burnet
Then in January 1723, Governor Samuel Shute abruptly returned to England, so Wentworth took over in New Hampshire, governing until the arrival of Shute's replacement, William Burnet, in 1728.

Lieutenant governor (United States)

Lieutenant Governorlieutenant governorslieutenant governor candidate
John Wentworth (January 16, 1671 – December 12, 1730) served as Lieutenant Governor for the Province of New Hampshire from 1717 to 1730.

Province of New Hampshire

New HampshireProvince of New-HampshireColony of New Hampshire
John Wentworth (January 16, 1671 – December 12, 1730) served as Lieutenant Governor for the Province of New Hampshire from 1717 to 1730.

Dover, New Hampshire

DoverDover, NHCocheco
He was a grandson of "Elder" William Wentworth (born at Alford, Lincolnshire, England, in 1615; died in Dover, New Hampshire, March 16, 1697), an early settler in New England.

New England

Southern New EnglandNorthern New EnglandNew England region
He was a grandson of "Elder" William Wentworth (born at Alford, Lincolnshire, England, in 1615; died in Dover, New Hampshire, March 16, 1697), an early settler in New England.

John Wheelwright

Rev. John Wheelwright
William was a follower of the Rev. John Wheelwright.

Wells, Maine

WellsBerwickWells Beach
With him and 33 others, William signed, August 4, 1639, “A Combination for a Government at Exeter, N. H.” William moved to Wells, Maine, with Wheelwright; and when the latter went to England on the accession of Oliver Cromwell to power, William moved to Dover, where he was a ruling elder and often preached.

Oliver Cromwell

CromwellCromwellianOliver
With him and 33 others, William signed, August 4, 1639, “A Combination for a Government at Exeter, N. H.” William moved to Wells, Maine, with Wheelwright; and when the latter went to England on the accession of Oliver Cromwell to power, William moved to Dover, where he was a ruling elder and often preached.

Province of Massachusetts Bay

MassachusettsMassachusetts BayProvince of Massachusetts
Before New Hampshire received its own Royal Governor in 1741, its governors were also commissioned to govern the neighboring Province of Massachusetts Bay, where they spent most of their time.

Richard Waldron (Secretary)

Richard WaldronRichardson in law
Richard Waldron (1694-1753) was a major opponent of the Wentworth oligarchy in colonial New Hampshire.

Wentworth–Coolidge Mansion

Wentworth-Coolidge MansionDrift Contemporary Art GalleryGovernor Wentworth House
In 1741, the governorship of the province of New Hampshire was separated from that of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, and Benning Wentworth, son of former Lieutenant-Governor John Wentworth, was appointed its royal governor.

Nottingham, New Hampshire

NottinghamNottingham Square
Incorporated in 1722 by Lieutenant Governor John Wentworth, Nottingham was named for Daniel Finch, 2nd Earl of Nottingham.

Canterbury, New Hampshire

CanterburyCanterbury, NH
First granted by Lieutenant Governor John Wentworth in 1727, the town was named for William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury.

Marlow, New Hampshire

Marlow
Addison had signed the appointment papers making the governor's father, John Wentworth, lieutenant-governor of New Hampshire in 1717.

Sarah Wentworth Apthorp Morton

Sarah Wentworth MortonSarah Wentworth Apthorp
Her maternal grandfather was Samuel Wentworth (1708–1766), also a Boston merchant, and his father was John Wentworth (1671–1730), the colonial Lieutenant Governor of New Hampshire who lived in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.